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The Essentials: The Brad Bird Era begins May 2


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The film critic Roger Ebert, who was born the same day as McCartney (June 18, 1942), added "A Hard Day's Night" to his list of Great Movies in 1996. He called it "joyous and original."

"After more than three decades," he wrote, "it has not aged and is not dated; it stands outside its time, its genre and even rock. It is one of the great life-affirming landmarks of the movies."

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Ben and Brad's pre movie blather seemed kind of clueless.  in that---

1. I don't think, despite both their claims, that there WAS anyone by the time the movie came out that HADN'T heard of The Beatles.  OR that anyone still not familiar with them would have bothered to go see it.

2.  While I agree that, as both said,  either one of them could have stepped out and worked as actors.  But, seemed to drop the ball in not mentioning RINGO STARR'S seven movie foray into the profession post Beatles.  

But despite my having both an old VHS copy and a DVD copy, I still tune in to TCM whenever they show A HARD DAY'S NIGHT.  :) 

Oh, and Ringo meant to say "Hard day's night",  and it was no accident.  He was always coming up with what John Lennon called "Ringoisms" , ;)   Another example of a Beatle's tune title thanks to Ringo's peculiar vernacular was "Eight Days A Week".  

Sepiatone

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This was the Final Jeopardy answer on the November 10, 2020 episode of "Jeopardy!" The category was "History in the Movies." Can you guess the question?

Vehicles in “2001: A Space Odyssey” featured this airline’s logo, but the company went bankrupt in 1991

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On 11/15/2020 at 10:13 AM, Sepiatone said:

Indeed it was, sewhite.    In  fact, it folded TEN YEARS before when the movie takes place.  Went out of business in 1991.

Sepiatone

Aeroflot (referenced by travel bags seen on the space station) survived  to see 2001, but the Soviet Union did not.

Howard Johnson's restaurant business barely existed by 2001.  They once had over 1,000 restaurants but were down to just a handful by the 21st century. 

And the Bell System monopoly was broken up years before we got to 2001.  It was thought that we'd still go into booths to make phone calls (imagine the luxury of a private phone call, for both the caller and those nearby, whether it's video or voice)

 

 

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23 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

(imagine the luxury of a private phone call, for both the caller and those nearby, whether it's video or voice)

 

 

:o  You mean a place where someone can make a "phone" call to someone else without everyone in say, a doctor or dentist's waiting room listening in?  Or the two involved in the call NOT walking into traffic, walls and other people as they're nosediving into their devices?

AHHhhhhhhh...................  T'would be Heaven!  :wub:

Sepiatone

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In its 1998 survey of the greatest movies of all time, the American Film Institute ranked "2001" at No. 22. In the AFI's updated 2007 survey, the picture climbed to 15th place.

In 2005, the AFI selected a command from astronaut Dave Bowman (Keir Dullea) to the sentient computer HAL 9000 as No. 78 on its Top 100 list of greatest movie quotes.

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The little girl with whom Dr. Heywood Floyd (William Sylvester) chats via a Skype-like call from space was Kubrick's youngest daughter Vivian. At the age of 17, she directed a documentary about her father's filming of "The Shining" (1980), and later composed the score for his 1987 Vietnam War saga "Full Metal Jacket" under the pseudonym Abigail Mead. She left her family just before Kubrick's death in 1999 to become a Scientologist in California. 

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When Dr. Floyd first arrives at the space station, he is seated in an elevator with a hostess wearing a pink outfit. She was played by the onetime model Maggie London, who later married Manfred Mann lead singer Mike d'Abo and became the mother of the actress Olivia d'Abo of TV's "The Wonder Years." London's niece Maryam d'Abo was the lead actress opposite Timothy Dalton's James Bond in "The Living Daylights" (1987).

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Be sure to pay attention to the scene pictured below in "An American in Paris" (1951), The actress with Gene Kelly is Noel Neill, who was the first person to play the intrepid Daily Planet reporter Lois Lane in the live-action movie serials "Superman" (1948) and "Atom Man vs. Superman"(1950).  She would play the character again in "Adventures of Superman," the 1950s television series starring George Reeves -- but not immediately. The first television Lois was the actress Phyllis Coates, who had appeared in the 1951 film "Superman and the Mole Men." She was replaced by Neill on the TV series after Season 1. Neill, who died on July 3, 2016, would have observed her 100th birthday on November 25.

Patricia Kelly on Instagram: “This scene in An American in Paris always  makes me laugh—when the actress Noel Neill (kn… in 2020 | An american in  paris, Lois lane, I laughed

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