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The Essentials: The Brad Bird Era begins May 2


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2 hours ago, jakeem said:

 

Leslie Caron reviews costume sketches done by designer Orry-Kelly for AN AMERICAN IN PARIS ('51). The film garnered eight Academy Award nominations and won six including Best Costume Design – Color. #TCMEssentials
 
 

AND in the process somehow made it impossible for Gene Kelly's next and even better movie musical to even be considered for such Academy Award honors.

You know, the one that's even livelier, funnier, more entertaining and considered by almost eveyone today to be THE best movie musical ever, let alone one of the best movies regardless of genre that Hollywood has ever produced, and thus allowing that inferior circus flick of DeMille's to garner the Oscar for Best Picture of the following year.

(...uh-huh, you know, that one with "Rain" in the title and with Gene dancin' around in the stuff during one memorable sequence)

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See the source image
 
In 2001, film critic Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun Times newspaper added "The Maltese Falcon" to his list of "Great Movies" and declared that the drama "stands as a great divide" 
 
He continued: "Consider what was true after its release in 1941 and was not true before:
 
(1) The movie defined Humphrey Bogart's performances for the rest of his life; his hard-boiled Sam Spade rescued him from a decade of middling roles in B gangster movies and positioned him for 'Casablanca,' 'Treasure of the Sierra Madre,' 'The African Queen' and his other classics.

(2) It was the first film directed by John Huston, who for more than 40 years would be a prolific maker of movies that were muscular, stylish and daring.

(3) It contained the first screen appearance of Sydney Greenstreet, who went on, in 'Casablanca' and many other films, to become one of the most striking character actors in movie history.

(4) It was the first pairing of Greenstreet and Peter Lorre, and so well did they work together that they made nine other movies, including 'Casablanca' in 1942 and 'The Mask of Dimitrios' (1944), in which they were not supporting actors but actually the stars.

(5) And some film histories consider 'The Maltese Falcon' the first film noir. It put down the foundations for that native American genre of mean streets, knife-edged heroes, dark shadows and tough dames."

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On 12/1/2020 at 11:16 AM, jakeem said:
In 2004, the American Film Institute ranked Bogart's final line as the 14th greatest movie quote of all time.
 
 

And according to John Huston Bogie is mostly responsible for the line being in the film. 

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44 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

And according to John Huston Bogie is mostly responsible for the line. 

Are you sure it wasn't mostly Shakespeare?

Prospero:
Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp'd tow'rs, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on; and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

 

THE TEMPEST ACT 4, SCENE 1, 148–158

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19 hours ago, jakeem said:

Are you sure it wasn't mostly Shakespeare?

Prospero:
Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp'd tow'rs, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve,
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on; and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

 

THE TEMPEST ACT 4, SCENE 1, 148–158

Huston talks about this in the book.     Yes,  the line is mostly from Willy,   but Willy wasn't the one that recommend the line be used in the film.    That was Bogie.

PS:  I edited my post with "for the line being in the film".

  

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HEY, and speakin' of "stuff"...

Didn't ya always like that old routine George Carlin did on this subject?

(...never mind...just a thought...now what was this thread about again???)

 

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Huston's adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's 1930 detective tale was the third screen version.

The story earlier was told onscreen in a 1931 film that starred Ricardo Cortez (as Sam Spade) and Bebe Daniels (as Brigid O'Shaughnessy).

See the source image

In 1936, a revised version titled "Satan Met a Lady" starred Bette Davis (as Valerie Purvis) and Warren William (as Ted Shane).

See the source image

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1 hour ago, jakeem said:

The mortally wounded ship's captain who died after delivering a package to Spade's office was played by John Huston's father Walter.

walter huston and humphrey bogart--maltese falcon 1941 | John huston,  Humphrey bogart, Jack warner

 

 

AND, who looks like he's got about the same level of energy left in him as my poor UPS driver does lately!

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