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The Essentials: The Brad Bird Era begins May 2


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TCM
 
Director Richard Lester later acknowledged that A HARD DAY'S NIGHT ('64) was put together quickly because it was thought The Beatles might be a passing vogue with little staying power.
 
This was The Beatles first film, and many still consider it the best. #TCMEssentials
 
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8:00 PM · Jun 27, 2020·Sprinklr
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Favorite Beatles song, it's hard to say, there are so many that I love:

Helter Skelter

Revolution #9 

Their cover of Twist and Shout

Eleanor Rigby

While My Guitar Gently Weeps

Get Back

I love almost all their stuff.  I just got The White Album on vinyl for my birthday.

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Favorite Beatles song, it's hard to say, there are so many that I love:

Helter Skelter

Revolution #9 

Their cover of Twist and Shout

Eleanor Rigby

While My Guitar Gently Weeps

Get Back

I love almost all their stuff.  I just got The White Album on vinyl for my birthday.

Do you mind if I ask: What is it about "Revolution #9" that you love? Not judging; just wondering. 🙂

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Since The Beatles and best song are still a topic here:   Those two songs I listed were NOT really my favorite;      I was cracking wise and only mentioned them because they related to both The Beatles AND the actual topic at hand here,    Brad Bird.

 My actual favorite Beatles song,,,,  wow that is hard,  but it would be either Norwegian Wood,  or Paper Back Writer.

  

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1 hour ago, sagebrush said:

Do you mind if I ask: What is it about "Revolution #9" that you love? Not judging; just wondering. 🙂

Oops I meant the regular “Revolution”song. I couldn’t remember which one was the “normal” one and which was the one with all the talking. I don’t care for that one. 

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32 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Oops I meant the regular “Revolution”song. I couldn’t remember which one was the “normal” one and which was the one with all the talking. I don’t care for that one. 

What you didn't teach your bird to say "number 9,  number 9,  number 9 ,,,,,,"? 

I have found that this is a sure way to get unwanted house guests to leave early!

 

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3 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Oops I meant the regular “Revolution”song. I couldn’t remember which one was the “normal” one and which was the one with all the talking. I don’t care for that one. 

You probably don't care, but there were actually three: "Revolution", the hard rocker everybody knows, released as Double-A-sided single with "Hey Jude"; "Revolution One", the slower version on The White Album with Paul and George singing "bop shooby doo wops" and a horn section; and "Revolution Nine", which is the uber-artsy-fartsy sound collage that you don't care for.

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

You probably don't care, but there were actually three: "Revolution", the hard rocker everybody knows, released as Double-A-sided single with "Hey Jude"; "Revolution One", the slower version on The White Album with Paul and George singing "bop shooby doo wops" and a horn section; and "Revolution Nine", which is the uber-artsy-fartsy sound collage that you don't care for.

I love the one that starts with the scream. That’s the one I meant to say I love. 
 

ive heard the slow version too, where Paul & George also tried to make it sound like doowop or something. lol. 

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My understanding is that this version was recorded first, but John claimed he was under pressure to produce a more uptempo tune for the single so he went back and really rocked it out. There was evidently some confusion about how the final version was going to sound. When the Beatles sorta performed it live (mostly lip synching and air-playing their instruments to prerecorded tracks) on the David Frost show, it sounds mostly like the single version, but Paul and George are still doing the "bop shooby doo wops".

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Yes, and reportedly Cary also said the same thing about Rex Harrison when his name came up for the film version of My Fair Lady.

However, I've always doubted there was ANY truth to the humor he supposedly said the same thing AGAIN when supposedly being asked to replace Zero Mostel as Tevye in the film version of Fiddler on the Roof.

(...and of course for obvious reasons...Cary would've been MUCH too old for the part by 1971)

;)

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Yes, and reportedly Cary also said the same thing about Rex Harrison when his name came up for the film version of My Fair Lady.

However, I've always doubted there was ANY truth to the humor he supposedly said the same thing AGAIN when supposedly being asked to replace Zero Mostel as Tevye in the film version of Fiddler on the Roof.

(...and of course for obvious reasons...Cary would've been MUCH too old for the part by 1971)

;)

Imagine what it was like for poor Billy Wilder, who could never persuade Grant to star in one of his pictures.

Second Takes -- Billy Wilder

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Whenever Broadway does eventually reopen, Hugh Jackman is set to star as Professor Harold Hill in a revival of THE MUSIC MAN. :)

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8 hours ago, Dargo said:

However, I've always doubted there was ANY truth to the humor he supposedly said the same thing AGAIN when supposedly being asked to replace Zero Mostel as Tevye in the film version of Fiddler on the Roof.

Oy!

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Bingo! The Fabs covered the Meredith Willson tune on their second album, "With The Beatles," and performed it live in 1963 -- the year after the movie version of "The Music Man" was released.

 

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Actually, there IS another Music Man/Beatles connection, ya know.

In the original stage version of The Music Man and during the scene in which Harold Hill is coming onto Marian inside the library, one of the lyrics he sings to her was "Why don't we do it in the road?".

BUT, Warner Brothers thought it MUCH too suggestive and probably would've been cut by the production code censors at the time anyway, and so as they say, it was left on the cutting room floor.

(....betcha didn't know THAT, did ya!)

;)

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