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The Essentials: The Brad Bird Era begins May 2


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7 hours ago, jakeem said:

 Ethan Edwards was John Wayne's favorite character. In fact, he even named his youngest son John Ethan Wayne. 

30 Interesting And Fascinating Facts About The Searchers - Tons Of ...

The younger Wayne co-starred with his father in the 1971 Western "Big Jake," in which the preteen boy played the grandson of the title character -- New Mexico rancher Jake McCandles. Set in 1909, the film revolved around the boy's kidnapping by a gang for a $1 million ransom.

Ethan Wayne in Big Jake (1971)

Loved the reoccurring line in that picture, "I thought you were dead", and Wayne's reactions to it.

(...always thought Big Jake one of Wayne's better late career movies, and perhaps because Richard Boone plays the villain so well in it)

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6 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Loved the reoccurring line in that picture, "I thought you were dead", and Wayne's reactions to it.

(...always thought Big Jake one of Wayne's better late career movies, and perhaps because Richard Boone plays the villain so well in it)

Actually, I believe Big Jake's response to an "I thought you were dead" comment may be my favorite line from a "Duke" Wayne film:

 

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50 minutes ago, jakeem said:

Actually, I believe Big Jake's response to an "I thought you were dead" comment may be my favorite line from a "Duke" Wayne film:

 

Doesn't he later on say to another guy who says it, "Ya know, I think I'll shot the next guy who tells me that!" ?

(...it's been a while since I've watched it)

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42 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Doesn't he later on say to another guy who says it, "Ya know, I think I'll shot the next guy who tells me that!" ?

(...it's been a while since I've watched it)

"Dead? The next person who says that I'm gonna shoot, so help me" -- McCandles after a hotel desk clerk (Jerry Summers) tells him he thought he was dead:

33810-1688.jpg 

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Natalie Wood had been acting in movies for 13 years when she appeared as the kidnapped teen Debbie Edwards in "The Searchers."

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It was one of the first films for Wood's younger sister Lana, who played Debbie as a child.

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Lana Wood, who continues to act in productions, probably is best remembered as Plenty O'Toole -- the secondary Bond Girl opposite Sir Sean Connery in the 1971 007 thriller "Diamonds Are Forever."

James Bond - Diamonds Are Forever busty Bond girl looks like THIS ...

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Many  filmmakers have been influenced by "The Seachers." The writer-director Paul Schrader acknowledged that he used Ford's Western as a model for his gritty 1979 drama "Hardcore," in which George C. Scott played a conservative Midwestern father looking for his missing daughter amid Southern California's porn subculture. 

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On 8/19/2020 at 1:17 PM, jakeem said:

Ethan Edwards was John Wayne's favorite character. In fact, he even named his youngest son John Ethan Wayne. 

I have seen this film many times and I watched the intro and outro last night. I saw bits and pieces of it switching back from other channels. 

Ben and Brad Bird seemed to think the ending has Ethan riding away alone in the saddle because of the western myth of the cowboy on the trail. I thought it was a powerful ending but Ethan has not changed that much. He cannot bring himself to kill Debbie, but he cannot fully accept her. He might still think "Comanch" every time he looks at her, so I believe he is still worried he could go into a rage and kill her. So, he rides away at the end, probably never to return...

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40 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I have seen this film many times and I watched the intro and outro last night. I saw bits and pieces of it switching back from other channels. 

Ben and Brad Bird seemed to think the ending has Ethan riding away alone in the saddle because of the western myth of the cowboy on the trail. I thought it was a powerful ending but Ethan has not changed that much. He cannot bring himself to kill Debbie, but he cannot fully accept her. He might still think "Comanch" every time he looks at her, so I believe he is still worried he could go into a rage and kill her. So, he rides away at the end, probably never to return...

Can't see what makes you say that.

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That's what western movie heroes do.  Alan Ladd did it in Shane (1953).  Charles Bronson did it in Once Upon a Time in the West (1968).  Cleavon Little did it in Blazing Saddles (1974).  Can't argue against authority like that.

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23 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

That's what western movie heroes do.  Alan Ladd did it in Shane (1953).  Charles Bronson did it in Once Upon a Time in the West (1968).  Cleavon Little did it in Blazing Saddles (1974).  Can't argue against authority like that.

 My favorite Wayne movie  is Howard Hawks' "Red River" (1948). But the ending has always thrown me for a loop because rancher Thomas Dunson (Wayne) seemed to be dead serious about killing his "treacherous" adopted son, Matthew Garth (Montgomery Clift). Was Wayne's heroic image so sacrosanct it always had to be protected onscreen? Or was there a Hollywood taboo about a father killing his son?

 

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On 8/23/2020 at 8:22 AM, Det Jim McLeod said:

I have seen this film many times and I watched the intro and outro last night. I saw bits and pieces of it switching back from other channels. 

Ben and Brad Bird seemed to think the ending has Ethan riding away alone in the saddle because of the western myth of the cowboy on the trail. I thought it was a powerful ending but Ethan has not changed that much. He cannot bring himself to kill Debbie, but he cannot fully accept her. He might still think "Comanch" every time he looks at her, so I believe he is still worried he could go into a rage and kill her. So, he rides away at the end, probably never to return...

 

On 8/23/2020 at 9:03 AM, slaytonf said:

Can't see what makes you say that.

I think a lot critics and essayists have interpreted the ending exactly that way. I'll see if I can't find some examples online.

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The 1959 thriller "North By Northwest" was  Sir Alfred Hitchcock's fourth and last screen collaboration with Cary Grant and one of the filmmaker's best-ever suspense tales. It also followed one of his favorite formulas: A man is accused of a crime he did not commit, and goes on the lam in search of evidence that will prove his innocence. Robert Donat played such a character in "The 39 Steps" (1935), one of the director's final British films before he moved to Hollywood. It also was the situation for characters played by Robert Cummings in "Saboteur" (1942), Grant in "To Catch a Thief" (1955) and Jon Finch in "Frenzy" (1972). 

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12 hours ago, jakeem said:

The 1959 thriller "North By Northwest" was  Sir Alfred Hitchcock's fourth and last screen collaboration with Cary Grant and one of the filmmaker's best-ever suspense tales. It also followed one of his favorite formulas: A man is accused of a crime he did not commit, and goes on the lam in search of evidence that will prove his innocence. Robert Donat played such a character in "The 39 Steps" (1935), one of the director's final British films before he moved to Hollywood. It also was the situation for characters played by Robert Cummings in "Saboteur" (1942), Grant in "To Catch a Thief" (1955) and Jon Finch in "Frenzy" (1972). 

 

And many more, including the appropriately titled The Wrong Man (1956).  I wonder if a comprehensive list could be assembled?  I believe it would comprise over half of his movies.  Oh, yeah, another:  Young and Innocent (1937).

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17 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

And many more, including the appropriately titled The Wrong Man (1956).  I wonder if a comprehensive list could be assembled?  I believe it would comprise over half of his movies.  Oh, yeah, another:  Young and Innocent (1937).

"Murder!" (1930) is about  the wrong woman accused of murder-- an actress played by Norah Baring. She doesn't help her case very much because she has no memory of the incident.

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11 hours ago, slaytonf said:

And many more, including the appropriately titled The Wrong Man (1956).  I wonder if a comprehensive list could be assembled?  I believe it would comprise over half of his movies.  Oh, yeah, another:  Young and Innocent (1937).

One of my favorites of this type of Hitchcock film is I CONFESS, although Montgomery Clift's Father Logan character far from goes on the lam to profess his innocence. I think this film and Clift's performance in it are greatly underappreciated. 

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"North By Northwest" received three 1959 Academy Award nominations: Best Color Art Direction-Set Decoration (William A. Horning, Robert F. Boyle, Merrill Pye, Henry Grace and Frank R. McKelvy), Best Film Editing (George Tomasini) and Best Original Screenplay (Ernest Lehman). In 2005, the Writers Guild of America East and the Writers Guild of America West compiled a list of the 100 Best Screenplays in movie history. "North By Northwest" was No. 21. On March 25, 2001, Dame Julie Andrews presented Lehman an honorary Oscar for his career achievements. He died on July 2, 2005 at the age of 89.

 

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Based on the 1946 novel "Build My Gallows High" by Daniel Manwaring (under the name Geoffrey Homes), the classic film noir effort "Out of the Past" (1947) teamed  Robert Mitchum, Jane Greer and Kirk Douglas (in only his second film). Directed by Jacques Tourneur ("Cat People"), the drama stars Mitchum as Jeff Markham, a onetime private detective now living under an assumed name in a small California town. He soon finds himself being dragged back into a romantic triangle also involving the totally untrustworthy Kathie Moffat (Greer) and her equally duplicitous gambler boyfriend Whit Sterling (Douglas). Manwaring adapted the film from his novel.

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The film was remade in 1984 by director Taylor Hackford ("An Officer and a Gentleman") as "Against All Odds," with a cast that included Jeff Bridges, Rachel Ward, James Woods, Alex Karras and Richard Widmark. Greer (pictured below with Widmark) appeared briefly in the updated version as Ward's mother.  
 
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