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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

ABSOLUTELY! I had forgotten about that. Old TCM recordings have the old animated logos, like King Kong. I miss those!

Haha me too and I was a grown up!

I just saw on the news last night Bend OR has the very last Blockbuster store in operation.

I think it was in my parents' recording of Summer Rental there was a Pop Secret commercial.  It featured popcorn kernels sunbathing  at the beach (wearing sunglasses!) and as the sun got hotter, they popped and turned over in their lounge chair. 

We were watching something on TV the other day, and I saw that Folgers brought back their "The best part of waking up, is Folgers in your cup" jingle (most likely in response to Geico's parody of their ad) and I lamented the lack of commercial jingles.  Who didn't love the Big Red jingle? We also played a "Name That 80s Tune" game on You Tube and again I lamented the lack of original theme songs for television shows. 

Yes! I saw the Blockbuster store in Bend.  I obviously didn't rent anything, as Bend is 3+ hours from my house.  But it is true. I think there are a handful of video rental places around; but with the exception of Movie Madness in SE PDX, going to a video store isn't really on my radar anymore.

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Well, there's still a small chain( really, three outlets in three different cities) called FAMILY VIDEO in operation 'round here.  The closest one to  me is in neighboring TAYLOR, MI. , a 5-10 minute drive from me.   Another just down the street from my daughter, who lives a 45 minute drive away.  Not sure where #3 is though.  But once the Covid restrictions are lifted enough, I'll head for the Taylor store and check it out.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I was a member of Home Film Festival  for 4-5 years and I believe at least two of their catalogs in the bookshelf. 

I was one for a little less time, maybe three or four years. If one lived in a small town it was a great place to order

foreign or less well-known American films. I probably have some of the old catalogs around somewhere. They

were a dream for any film fan. And the people who took your orders were always very friendly and polite.

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5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, there's still a small chain( really, three outlets in three different cities) called FAMILY VIDEO in operation 'round here.  The closest one to  me is in neighboring TAYLOR, MI. , a 5-10 minute drive from me.   Another just down the street from my daughter, who lives a 45 minute drive away.  Not sure where #3 is though.  But once the Covid restrictions are lifted enough, I'll head for the Taylor store and check it out.  ;) 

Sepiatone

That's the chain in the town I live.

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I owned a video store from 1993-2002. I managed one from 1985-1992. Unfortunately when I finally got my own store the boom of the 1980's had past and stores were soon to be dwindling. Blockbuster hurt the mom and pop stores like mine but so-even more-did Netflix. I do miss them days [actually mostly nights] when the weekends meant business was good and if it rained business was better. Some "new releases' were big deals back in the day. I still remember when Back to the Future hit the stores. And Jurassic Park. Talking about movies all the time with my customers. Recommending something like The Third Man and having that person come back to me saying how much he enjoyed it was extremely gratifying. It wasn't a job cuz-being a film buff-I loved it. Alas, nothing lasts.....now I work in the billing department of a medical group. How the mighty have fallen. *Sigh*

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2 hours ago, cinemanut said:

I owned a video store from 1993-2002. I managed one from 1985-1992. Unfortunately when I finally got my own store the boom of the 1980's had past and stores were soon to be dwindling. Blockbuster hurt the mom and pop stores like mine but so-even more-did Netflix. I do miss them days [actually mostly nights] when the weekends meant business was good and if it rained business was better. Some "new releases' were big deals back in the day. I still remember when Back to the Future hit the stores. And Jurassic Park. Talking about movies all the time with my customers. Recommending something like The Third Man and having that person come back to me saying how much he enjoyed it was extremely gratifying. It wasn't a job cuz-being a film buff-I loved it. Alas, nothing lasts.....now I work in the billing department of a medical group. How the mighty have fallen. *Sigh*

Mom-and-pop stores were a great place to socialize, if you found one where the bored checkers liked to  talk about the movies.  In Boston and the suburbs, we had Videosmith, which were like small cozy bookstore-nooks, without the neon, blaring ads, and high pressure to rent the summer hit from six months ago.  The rise of Blockbuster created  a philosophical rift between movie fans:  Were rentals places that served the studios, with one more go-round for the big recent hits, or libraries where you could pick old movies off the shelf?

Unfortunately, BOTH became psychologically obsolete once Netflix-by-mail hit:  Once you had the ability to rent with a computer click and return at your mailbox, the "hunting instinct" was gone once you walked into the store.  There was almost literally nothing you wanted to watch, if you knew you'd have to make a second trip to return it.  😕

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Well Camille,  most video store outlets in my town had "drive thru"  drop-off boxes that you could drop the tapes(or discs) into without leaving the comfort of your car.  Whenever you were out and about,like going to the store or pizzeria, (or liquor store) you could quickly swing by and drop it off. No tortuous walk ALL THE WAY from your car to the front door of the video place and then, (aieeee!) even further inside!  :o  Uuuunnnnnngh!

Sepiatone

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On 4/22/2020 at 5:54 PM, EricJ said:

Nowadays, we use these-here "Disk" thingies, and--since Netflix-by-mail deservedly killed off all the Blockbuster videos (and the mom-and-pop stores like Boston's Videosmith)--we do the act of Friday-night browsing at our local libraries.

The only people who miss VHS, FWIH, are horror/B-movie fanboys who miss the cool covers.  But, y'know, they were sorta cool.

Oh, I don't know about that...I miss VHS, and I mostly dislike horror movies.

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I can't believe those few movie-rental places you guys speak of -- the ones that still exist -- are still open.  Wouldn't renting movies be considered a "non-essential" service?  (Talking about the Corona Virus lockdown, of course.)

There's a pretty good movie rental  (ok, DVD rental) place just down the street from me.  I was always able to find something I was interested in renting.  And yes, just browsing around in it was fun.  The last DVD I rented from this place was "The Book Shop"  (not to be confused with the wretched rubbish movie that came out around the same time, "Book Smart"-- stay away from that one.)     This was around the end of February.  I was way overdue returning it, finally got a phone message from the place.  When I finally returned it, there was a sign saying they were closed due to Covid19 and there was no mention of when or even if, they'd reopen at some future date.

I liked this place,  I like being able to still rent movies.  I don't "do" Netflix or any other streaming service, and so far I've not felt the need to get it.  Typically, I'd rent a movie from Jumbo Video ( as it's called) about once a month, usually to catch up on recent releases that I'd missed when they were showing at the theatre  ( in Ontario, it's almost all Cineplex, although that might be changing.)  "The Book Shop" is a good example of what I'm talking about.

Anyway, they're shut, and I'm worried that they might not be coming back.  As you've all noted here, renting movies is kind of becoming obsolete.  I was lucky that this place hung in there for as long as it did, plus it was just a 15 minute walk from my home.  (They did tell me once, when I was telling them Iwas glad they were still around,  that they made most of their money from renting video games and consoles.  )

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I noted you're from Canada, misswonderly3, and I thought to mention my fondness for the Canadian label ASTRAL VIDEO.  At present, I've got some 225 of them.  All released in the 1980s with the ROOSTER-IN-THE-CIRCLE logo.  I should say I don't have 225 different titles -- that number includes multiples of a number of Astral releases.  For instance:  The 1980 Canadian comedy DIRTY TRICKS, the 1981 Maple Leaf comedy UTILITIES and the 1978 comedy SILVER BEARS I rounded up 3 clamshells of each.  UTILITIES was especially easy to find.  I could've rounded up 5 of them, but I stopped at three.  :P

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16 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Anyway, they're shut, and I'm worried that they might not be coming back.  As you've all noted here, renting movies is kind of becoming obsolete.  I was lucky that this place hung in there for as long as it did, plus it was just a 15 minute walk from my home.  (They did tell me once, when I was telling them Iwas glad they were still around,  that they made most of their money from renting video games and consoles.  )

If Reed Hastings hadn't personally killed off Netflix-by-mail--because "Streaming was the future", by which he meant, the postage rates were getting too expensive--it would have been around a lot longer.  There was a mania for streaming Instant Netflix when it arrived in '10, but that all came to a COVID-like crash when Starz took 1500 of their catalog movies off the service in '13, causing what became known as "Netflix-pocalypse":  The day all the trending folks discovered, gasp, Netflix wasn't digitizing the movies themselves, and movies DON'T stay on streaming services forever!  😱  (Which came as a shock to those bragging "I've finally thrown out my DVD collection, since Instant Netflix has it all!")  Ever since then, we've had those "What's Leaving Netflix in May!" articles on trendy news-blogs every month,  rather like the pollen warnings in the weather report.

But fact is, a la carte VOD digital rental on Amazon and Vudu seems to have caught on, in the same places where digital purchase infamously plummeted off a cliff throughout the 10's.  A), Since we're only renting it overnight, we don't have to worry about "What if they don't keep it forever, like they promised?", B ), rentals are about the same $5-7.50 price they were when Blockbuster closed, and C), being able to delete the movie with a click saves ex-Netflix-mail viewers that long trip to the mailbox to return it.  (Don't laugh, that's a plus for us urban apartment folks who don't get their mail picked up by the postman, and have to go to the corner box.)  Nice to know that the technology FINALLY found its own appropriate niche, since it didn't belong trying to barge into any other.

I still prefer strolling down to our own local public super-library--since I live a block away--but it can be a month or two before a current hit arrives (and then, only if it's an "unwanted" title that somebody bought sight-unseen and then donated to get rid of after they watched it), so if I'm absolutely itching to watch last summer's hit I didn't get around to, I'll sometimes plunk down the $3-5 to rent it on Amazon or Vudu.  And then, only on Amazon if I'd gotten one of those "Free bonus digital dollars" they give you when you choose the cheaper package shipping.

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On 4/26/2020 at 7:07 AM, EricJ said:

If Reed Hastings hadn't personally killed off Netflix-by-mail--because "Streaming was the future", by which he meant, the postage rates were getting too expensive--it would have been around a lot longer.  There was a mania for streaming Instant Netflix when it arrived in '10, but that all came to a COVID-like crash when Starz took 1500 of their catalog movies off the service in '13, causing what became known as "Netflix-pocalypse":  The day all the trending folks discovered, gasp, Netflix wasn't digitizing the movies themselves, and movies DON'T stay on streaming services forever!  😱  (Which came as a shock to those bragging "I've finally thrown out my DVD collection, since Instant Netflix has it all!")  Ever since then, we've had those "What's Leaving Netflix in May!" articles on trendy news-blogs every month,  rather like the pollen warnings in the weather report.

But fact is, a la carte VOD digital rental on Amazon and Vudu seems to have caught on, in the same places where digital purchase infamously plummeted off a cliff throughout the 10's.  A), Since we're only renting it overnight, we don't have to worry about "What if they don't keep it forever, like they promised?", B ), rentals are about the same $5-7.50 price they were when Blockbuster closed, and C), being able to delete the movie with a click saves ex-Netflix-mail viewers that long trip to the mailbox to return it.  (Don't laugh, that's a plus for us urban apartment folks who don't get their mail picked up by the postman, and have to go to the corner box.)  Nice to know that the technology FINALLY found its own appropriate niche, since it didn't belong trying to barge into any other.

I still prefer strolling down to our own local public super-library--since I live a block away--but it can be a month or two before a current hit arrives (and then, only if it's an "unwanted" title that somebody bought sight-unseen and then donated to get rid of after they watched it), so if I'm absolutely itching to watch last summer's hit I didn't get around to, I'll sometimes plunk down the $3-5 to rent it on Amazon or Vudu.  And then, only on Amazon if I'd gotten one of those "Free bonus digital dollars" they give you when you choose the cheaper package shipping.

There are many people now who are realizing that streaming really doesn't have it all, especially if you have a niche interest like classic film or something else that is harder to come by using mainstream services. More and more people are sticking with physical media as you don't have to worry about losing access.  However, since everyone has their own streaming service, you really have to pick and choose what to subscribe to as you could easily be spending more on streaming than you did on cable/satellite. 

My friend downloaded all of his films onto a server which he accesses via Apple TV.  He keeps telling me I should do  the same.  1) I don't want to do all that work; and 2) I like having my collection displayed. I like having the boxes and the cover art.  It's an interest of mine.  A movie collection consolidated onto a server or discs in a binder is boring to me. He also spends forever scrolling through is server trying to find what he wants to watch.  I can grab my disk off the shelf very quickly.   But to each his own. I understand that people don't have the space, or want  the minimalist look, or what have you.

I remember during the Netflix streaming days that friends of mine would subscribe to the large 8 disc at a time plan (or whatever it was) and rent a ton of movies at once, burn copies of all of them and send them back.  

The library seems to be onto this scheme as every disk I've borrowed has some type of copy protection affixed to the top of the disc.  I assume that this is done in order for the library to offer the rental for free. I also always go to the library to borrow movies that I want to see.  For new releases, I usually go to Red Box because I can reserve the movie on my phone, there's always a coupon code making the rental super cheap, and I can return it to the store 3 blocks from my house. New releases take forever to get at the library and I'm too impatient to wait through  all the holds.  The only way I've gotten a new release quickly is if I lucked out and the film just happened to be on the Best Sellers shelf.  Movies designated as "Best Sellers" cannot have holds placed on them. You just have to be at the library and see it on  the shelf.

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