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Det Jim McLeod

Your Favorite Film Of These Stars

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Choose your favorite of these:

1. Marx Brothers

2. Boris Karloff

3. Bela Lugosi

4. Basil Rathbone

5. Farley Granger

6. Kirk Douglas

7. Natalie Wood

8. Bette Davis

9. Sidney Poitier

10. Walter Matthau

My Choices

1. Marx Brothers-Duck Soup

2. Boris Karloff-Bride Of Frankenstein

3. Bela Lugosi-The Raven 

4. Basil Rathbone-Son Of Frankenstein

5. Farley Granger-:Strangers On A Train

6. Kirk Douglas-Detective Story

7. Natalie Wood-Miracle On 34th Street

8. Bette Davis-What Ever Happened To Baby Jane

9. Sidney Poitier-A Patch Of Blue

10. Walter Matthau-The Taking Of Pelham One Two Three

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My Choices

1. Marx Brothers-Duck Soup

2. Boris Karloff-Bride Of Frankenstein

3. Bela Lugosi -Ninotchka  (or Dracula for one where he is the star). 

4. Basil Rathbone- The Adventure of Robin Hood    (note-  edited, since I had Captain Blood until I saw Larry's post!).  

5. Farley Granger-: Strangers On A Train

6. Kirk Douglas- Young Man with a Horn

7. Natalie Wood-Sex and the Single Girl

8. Bette Davis-  It's Love I'm After

9. Sidney Poitier- No Way Out  

10. Walter Matthau-  A Face in the Crowd 

 
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  1. Duck Soup
  2. Bride of Frankenstein
  3. Dracula
  4. The Adventures of Robin Hood
  5. Strangers on a Train
  6. Spartacus
  7. The Searchers
  8. The Letter
  9. In the Heat of the Night
  10. This was the toughest choice. My favorite movies that he appeared in are JFKBigger Than LifeA Face in the Crowd, and Lonely Are the Brave, but I wouldn't call any of them "Walter Matthau movies". 
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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

This was the toughest choice. My favorite movies that he appeared in are JFKBigger Than LifeA Face in the Crowd, and Lonely Are the Brave, but I wouldn't call any of them "Walter Matthau movies". 

He did a lot of great supporting performances in films I love like Charade and Mirage. After Pelham in 1974 I went to see his next 3 in row-The Front Page, The Sunshine Boys and The Bad News Bears. one of the most unlikely movie stars of the 1970s.

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We were going to see The Goodbye Girl as a family, but my parents became increasingly nervous about it. I guess some of their friends had seen it and informed them it might not be suitable for children with all these unmarrieds living together and one of them parading about nude and maybe they end up having sex. So, while we were in the ticket line, my dad actually changed his mind, and we watched Casey's Shadow instead. Pretty soon after that, I saw a TV airing of The Bad News Bears and recognized it was the same guy.

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1. Marx Brothers - A Night at the Opera

2. Boris Karloff - The Old Dark House

3. Bela Lugosi - Ninotchka

4. Basil Rathbone - Confession/The Mark of Zorro

5. Farley Granger - Strangers on a Train

6. Kirk Douglas - Seven Days in May

7. Natalie Wood - The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

8. Bette Davis - The Little Foxes

9. Sidney Poitier - A Patch of Blue

10. Walter Matthau - A Face in the Crowd

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43 minutes ago, Judex said:

1. Marx Brothers - A Night at the Opera

2. Boris Karloff - The Old Dark House

3. Bela Lugosi - Ninotchka

4. Basil Rathbone - Confession/The Mark of Zorro

5. Farley Granger - Strangers on a Train

6. Kirk Douglas - Seven Days in May

7. Natalie Wood - The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

8. Bette Davis - The Little Foxes

9. Sidney Poitier - A Patch of Blue

10. Walter Matthau - A Face in the Crowd

Nice list;   As for Bette Davis;    Well I could  have guessed you would select The Little Foxes  (ha ha).

What a way for a young actress to start her career. 

 

 

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Screen shot 2017-10-18 at 8.46.33 AM.png

1. Marx Brothers...GO WEST (1940)

2. Boris Karloff...he's not a favorite of mine.

3. Bela Lugosi...also not a favorite of mine.

4. Basil Rathbone...HEARTBEAT (1946)

5. Farley Granger...ROSEANNA MCCOY (1949)

6. Kirk Douglas...THE VIKINGS (1958)

7. Natalie Wood...not a favorite of mine. I like her as a person, but not as an actress. I find her performances either overly affected (during her child star days) or else underplayed (in her adult roles). I feel guilty saying this, since I can see why people like her.

8. Bette Davis...THE LITTLE FOXES (1941)

9. Sidney Poitier...LILIES OF THE FIELD (1963)

10. Walter Matthau...THE ODD COUPLE (1968)

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

1. Marx Brothers  DUCK SOUP

2. Boris Karloff   BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN  (best performance THE BODY SNATCHER )

3. Bela Lugosi     THE BLACK CAT

4. Basil Rathbone  THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES

5. Farley Granger  STRANGERS ON A TRAIN 

6. Kirk Douglas    SPARTACUS 

7. Natalie Wood  REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE  (I love her - not a favorite of mine either)

8. Bette Davis  WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?  (or The Little Foxes)

9. Sidney Poitier  IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT

10. Walter Matthau  THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE 

 

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1) A Night at the Opera--

For people who love the Marx Brothers and love Opera this is Sublime.

2) Frankenstein-- Boris Karloff gives his greatest film performance as a silent pantomine actor. It was his performance that created the Frankenstein Legend.

3) The Black Cat(1935)

Bela Lugosi never gave a bad performance. And here, his character borders on extreme compassion-- all the way to extreme vengeful violence.

Lugosi's amazing characterization is in an equally amazing pre-code Edgar Ulmer film.

4)David Copperfield

Basil Rathbone made you hate him as the evil Mr. Murdstone. He shows that a great actor can make you forget even his most famous serial characterization.

5) I don't care for this one.

6)  Never cared much for this one either-- but Lust For Life is an excellent portrayal of a tortured artist. And displays a seamless working relationship between a great director, Vincente Minnelli and his starring actor Kirk Douglas. Minnelli displayed his knowledge of French art and culture in other films, but this is his most serious attempt and it succeeds.

7)  Splendor in the Grass--Kansas playwright William Inge won the Oscar for the screenplay, and Natalie Wood should have won the Oscar for her performance as the sexually repressed tortured high school girl who has to grow up fast.

😎What Ever Happened To Baby Jane?--Again, I have to say that Bette Davis is an artist who never gave a bad performance, so it's difficult just to pick one. But acting in this movie took not just a great deal of physical endurance and artistic ability, it also took a great deal of Courage to be seen in a role like this at that time.

But people in any Endeavor become Legends because they step out front before others have the courage to.

9) Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?--Speaking of Courage, Sidney Poitier had to have more than his share just to show up in Hollywood in the 1950s. Where he became a role model not just for black artists, but for all of Hollywood to emulate.

In this film, he more than holds his own-- he's an equal to these two all-time screen legends: Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy.

10) I can't stand Walter Matthau on any level. But he was a serviceable villain in one of my favorite movies--Charade. 

I never got the inside dope on  whether he ever did wash his mouth out with that soap that Barbra Streisand gave him on the "Hello, Dolly!" set. LOL

 

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1. Marx Brothers - Animal Crackers

2. Boris Karloff - Frankenstein

3. Bela Lugosi - Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein 

4. Basil Rathbone - The Hound of the Baskervilles

5. Farley Granger - Side Street

6. Kirk Douglas - Ace In The Hole

7. Natalie Wood - This Property Is Condemned

8. Bette Davis - Beyond the Forest

9. Sidney Poitier - In The Heat Of The Night

10. Walter Matthau - Charley Varrick

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Choose your favorite of these:

1. Marx Brothers

2. Boris Karloff

3. Bela Lugosi

4. Basil Rathbone

5. Farley Granger

6. Kirk Douglas

7. Natalie Wood

8. Bette Davis

9. Sidney Poitier

10. Walter Matthau

Marx Brothers = ANIMAL CRACKERS

Boris Karloff = the old cartoon HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS

Bela Lugosi = NINOTCHKA

Basil Rathbone = ROBIN HOOD

Farley Granger = STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

Kirk Douglas = A LETTER TO 3 WIVES (where he actually plays a nice guy!)

Natalie Wood = WEST SIDE STORY

Bette Davis = ALL ABOUT EVE

Sidney Poitier = LILLIES OF THE FIELD

Walter Matthau = ODD COUPLE, CHARADE, & GOODBYE CHARLIE

186477.jpg

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4 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Splendor in the Grass--Kansas playwright William Inge won the Oscar for the screenplay, and Natalie Wood should have won the Oscar for her performance as the sexually repressed tortured high school girl who has to grow up fast.

One of my least liked GOOD movies.  It was relevant in a naughty way 59 years ago; now 'tis dated.  Another reason why I'm no fan of WARREN BEATTY who does a fine job. 

4 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

3) The Black Cat(1935)

Bela Lugosi never gave a bad performance. And here, his character borders on extreme compassion-- all the way to extreme vengeful violence.

I couldn't agree more.  Excellent. 

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sis1.jpg

1. Marx Brothers - Duck Soup

2. Boris Karloff - The Invisible Ray

3. Bela Lugosi - The Black Cat

4. Basil Rathbone - The Scarlet Claw

5. Farley Granger - Rope

6. Kirk Douglas - Paths of Glory

7. Natalie Wood - Gypsy

8. Bette Davis - The Sisters

9. Sidney Poitier - A Raisin in the Sun

10. Walter Matthau - Island of Love

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For some of these actors, I haven't seen a lot of their work, so I'll have to go with which of their films I have seen, and decide a favorite among those. 

1. Marx Brothers- A Night at the Opera

2. Boris Karloff- How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966); for films where he can be seen, I'd pick The Old Dark House

3. Bela Lugosi- Dracula, I guess.  I think this is honestly the only Bela Lugosi film I've seen.

4. Basil Rathbone- The Adventures of Robin Hood

5. Farley Granger- They Live By Night

6. Kirk Douglas- The Bad and the Beautiful

7. Natalie Wood- Bob, Carol, Ted and Alice

8. Bette Davis- All About Eve (This was a tough one.  I also want to include: The Letter, The Sisters, and Now Voyager

9. Sidney Poitier- Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (I think this is the only Sidney Poitier film I've seen, I'd like to have a different choice)

10. Walter Matthau- Grumpy Old Men

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6. Kirk Douglas - Cast a Giant Shadow or Seven Days in May

8. Bette Davis- Jezebel

9. Sidney Poitier-  The Defiant Ones

10. Walter Matthau- The Bad News Bears

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Boris Karloff - How the Grinch Stole Christmas

Basil Rathbone - Crossroads (the one with William Powell and Hedy Lamarr; not the Britney Spears movie with the same name)

Farley Granger - Strangers on a Train (anyone who knows me knows I can't stand him)

Kirk Douglas - 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea

Natalie Wood - Miracle on 34th Street

Bette Davis - The Little Foxes

Sidney Poitier - The Defiant Ones

Walter Matthau - The Odd Couple (The line "Divorced, broke, and sloppy" is a classic in my opinion)

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21 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Choose your favorite of these:

1. Marx Brothers

2. Boris Karloff

3. Bela Lugosi

4. Basil Rathbone

5. Farley Granger

6. Kirk Douglas

7. Natalie Wood

8. Bette Davis

9. Sidney Poitier

10. Walter Matthau

 

1. Marx Brothers  - A Night at the Opera

Groucho-Marx-Margaret-Dumont-Harpo-Chico

2. Boris Karloff - Bride of Frankenstein

Bride-of-Frankenstein-1935-Main.jpg

3. Bela Lugosi - Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein

abbott-and-costello-meet-frankenstein-ss

4. Basil Rathbone - Adventures of Robin Hood

adventures-of-robin-hood-1938-movie-revi

5. Farley Granger - Strangers on a Train

EB20040101REVIEWS0840802009AR.jpg

6. Kirk Douglas - Paths of Glory

Paths-of-Glory-image-2017-2.jpg

7. Natalie Wood - The Searchers

cover-8TkDNfpqRYxwNX2SGR0O9A9aB5s4gIs4.j

8. Bette Davis - The Letter

the_letter_davis_gun.jpg

9. Sidney Poitier - A Raisin in the Sun

A%20Raisin%20in%20the%20Sun_4.jpg?sha=8d

10 Walter Matthau - Lonely Are the Brave

MV5BNmNhNTZhNWEtNTg3OC00OTNkLWI0YTMtOGIw

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14 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

now 'tis dated. 

Being dated is a good thing around here.

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Like I always say when these "favorite" or "best" type threads show up, it's hard to just pick ONE over all the other great movies someone has done.  But I'll give it a try.....

Marx Brothers-- MONKEY BUSINESS

Boris Karloff--ISLE OF THE DEAD

Bela Lugosi--DRACULA

Basil Rathbone--Actually, most in his SHERLOCK HOLMES franchise.

Farley Granger--STRANGERS ON A TRAIN

Kirk Douglas--ACE IN THE HOLE

Natalie Wood--MARJORIE MORNINGSTAR

Bette Davis--THE PETRIFIED FOREST

Sidney Poitier--LILIES OF THE FIELD

Walter Matthau--CHARLEY VARRICK

Some made it due to flip of coin and others first to mind.

Sepiatone

 

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Being dated is a good thing around here.

In the context of that film, not good, just dated.  ZOHRA LAMPERT  is, of course, never dated. 

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29 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

In the context of that film, not good, just dated.  ZOHRA LAMPERT  is, of course, never dated. 

I'm curious what you found about SITG that was 'dated' (as compared to 90% or more of the movies released at the time).

 

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28 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

In the context of that film, not good, just dated.  ZOHRA LAMPERT  is, of course, never dated. 

I think Splendor In The Grass is an excellent movie. I still can't tell if you like it or you're  just complaining that it is dated. 

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I think Splendor In The Grass is an excellent movie. I still can't tell if you like it or you're  just complaining that it is dated. 

Det-- Indeed, "Splendor" is an excellent movie and I was confused by the comment as well .

To just dismiss "Splendor in the Grass" as being dated is a pejorative statement from the other poster.

The movie is an accurate depiction of 20th century sexuality in small town America before the late 60s sexual Revolution. Therefore it will have eternal value for a discussion of that time and place.

All of William Inge's works have universal and eternal worth as well-- that's what made him a great writer.

"Splendor" has other themes in it besides sexuality. The universal themes are materialism, social status, parental manipulation and the general pain of first loves.

I think the other poster missed entirely the universality of the film, by focusing on the sexuality, which he viewed as outdated.

But again as we often say you cannot always judge an artistic work's worth on today's social venue.

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20 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Det-- Indeed, "Splendor" is an excellent movie and I was confused by the comment as well .

To just dismiss "Splendor in the Grass" as being dated is a pejorative statement from the other poster.

The movie is an accurate depiction of 20th century sexuality in small town America before the late 60s sexual Revolution. Therefore it will have eternal value for a discussion of that time and place.

All of William Inge's works have universal and eternal worth as well-- that's what made him a great writer.

"Splendor" has other themes in it besides sexuality. The universal themes are materialism, social status, parental manipulation and the general pain of first loves.

I think the other poster missed entirely the universality of the film, by focusing on the sexuality, which he viewed as outdated.

But again as we often say you cannot always judge an artistic work's worth on today's social venue.

Well said;

Note that I asked this user,  what about the movie was 'dated',  since I have found all types of definitions,  as well as uses of, for the term,  just at this forum.

If one defines 'dated' as reflecting behaviors and attitudes from previous times (which many do),  then for me the term has little value when discussing films, that by design,  are trying to reflect behaviors and attitudes associated with specific historical 'eras' and \ or   regions.   

 

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