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Yoda1978

15 Favorite Classic TV Shows.

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On 5/28/2020 at 7:35 PM, lavenderblue19 said:

Route 66 

Perry Mason

The Saint

The Avengers

Burke's Law 

Ben Casey

Dr. Kildare

The Defenders

East Side, West Side

That Girl 

Mary Tyler Moore

Lunch With Soupy Sales

The French Chef

Monty Python's Flying Circus

The Tonight Show with Johnny

I could name at least a dozen more, ( Donna Reed, 77 Sunset Strip, The Untouchables, naked City.) Loved watching I Love Lucy, My Little Margie, Love That Bob, Our Muss  Brooks, Abbott and Costello in re-runs   and forgot never missed always watched  Dick Van Dyke Show , Adventures In Paradise   and for later in the '70's loved Family, always watched 60 Minutes but if I get into the '70's that will be another bunch .  Oh, I forgot It Takes a Thief  and Mission Impossible , I Spy and on and on.  St.Elsewhere for the '80's', LA Law and Knots Landing for the '90's, I could go on but I won't LOL

edited by me                                                                                               

 

Nice to see East Side, West Side mentioned, Lavender!  I remember watching them shoot part of an episode,  with Diana Van der Vlis, in 1963. They did a lot of location work.

(I don't think I'm ready to post in this thread -- too complicated! But I'll get to it at some point.)

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15. Alice

14. The Dean Martin Show 

13. Here's Lucy 

12. The FBI

11. The Mary Tyler Moore Show 

10. Love, American Style 

9. Leave it to Beaver 

8. Happy Days 

7. Three's Company 

6. Candid Camera

5. The Twilight Zone 

4. Laverne and Shirley 

3. Gomer Pyle, USMC

2. Dennis the Menace 

1. I Love Lucy 

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28 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Nice to see East Side, West Side mentioned, Lavender!  I remember watching them shoot part of an episode,  with Diana Van der Vlis, in 1963. They did a lot of location work.

(I don't think I'm ready to post in this thread -- too complicated! But I'll get to it at some point.)

It's a shame East Side, West Side was short lived. Glad you remembered the show Swithin.  I guess since we both lived in NY, the show had more meaning for us. Before I forget, another one I watched and loved was Car 54 Where Are You

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1. I LOVE LUCY

2. THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW

3. THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW

4. SEINFELD

5. LEAVE IT TO BEAVER 

6. THE TWILIGHT ZONE

7. FAMILY TIES

8.  HAPPY DAYS

9. BONANZA

10. MR. ED

11. THE HONEYMOONERS

12. BATMAN

13. FATHER KNOWS BEST

14. THE ADVENTURES OF OZZIE AND HARRIET

15. EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND

 

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11 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yeah maybe, well except for young Darleen Carr who played his daughter in it...

ron-howard-henry-fonda-janet-blair-darle

(...'cause I kind'a remember having a little crush on her back then)

"Primrose lane... such a fam'ly lives on... Primrose lane..."

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7 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

My ALL TIME FAVORITE TV SHOW - MAD MEN

I would say it's one of my favorite "new" programs. Until last week channel 500 on DirecTV was running

it every day without commercials, so I caught up on the half dozen or so episodes I missed during the

original run. When the final episode was shown they started over with the first one and I kept on watching.

When channel 500 went off the air last Friday they arranged it so that the final episode was the last one

they showed. I was surprised at how few people actually watched it compared to the influence and

press coverage it got. 

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14 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

My ALL TIME FAVORITE TV SHOW - MAD MEN

What a great show! During the original run of the series, I wondered how the November 22, 1963 assassination of President Kennedy would be addressed. You knew it was only a matter of time. It finally happened in the Season 3 episode "The Grown-Ups" as two characters talked in the office while an episode of "As the World Turns" aired on a TV in the background.

See the source image

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10 hours ago, MusicalsGalore said:

15. Alice

14. The Dean Martin Show 

13. Here's Lucy 

12. The FBI

11. The Mary Tyler Moore Show 

10. Love, American Style 

9. Leave it to Beaver 

8. Happy Days 

7. Three's Company 

6. Candid Camera

5. The Twilight Zone 

4. Laverne and Shirley 

3. Gomer Pyle, USMC

2. Dennis the Menace 

1. I Love Lucy 

Nice to see Here's Lucy. That one will be on my list when I post it.

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It's almost impossible to create such a narrow list when there are literally hundreds of programs across genres (and decades) to choose from!

But I will list 15 that have meaning for me, and I will do them in alphabetical order so I don't have to exactly rank them.

The Andy Griffith Show

I have a love-hate relationship with this show. I wrote a scathing review for it on the IMDb, because as a whole I think the show encourages conformity at the expense of individuality which I can't abide. Plus there are no storylines for any black characters, so it's definitely a white man's version of an idealized south. But I do think that despite its suffocating conservative framework, there are some valuable character-driven episodes. I prefer the post-Don Knotts episodes in color. I feel like Knotts' character Barney dominated too much especially in seasons 3-5. After he leaves, the show refocuses itself around Griffith and the various townsfolk. To me the main character is Mayberry itself, not Andy or Barney or any specific member of the cast.

Cybill

One of the best written sitcoms of the mid-to-late 90s. A classic blend of feminism, heart and humor. The show has some of the best drawn characters, they're all unique and serve a specific purpose. An excellent episode is the one where Cybill (Cybill Shepherd) has done an advertising campaign for shoes, and she realizes that they put her face on top of a thinner, younger model. Of course she and Mary Ann (Christine Baranski) vandalize the billboard to make a statement. Rebelliousness and mayhem aside, it's a thought-provoking thesis about self-image and how that image is conveyed to the world. All the episodes discuss vanity and self-worth. You can find the entire series currently on Amazon Prime.

Designing Women

A more sophisticated southern version of The Golden Girls. Best episode is the one where they address Delta Burke's weight gain-- "They Shoot Fat Women, Don't They?" which earned Delta a much-deserved Emmy nomination as Best Actress. I never met Delta, who was fired at the end of season 5, but I spent almost all of season 6 on the set as a production intern and that happened to be the year the show had its highest ratings. The best episode from season 6 is "The Strange Case of Clarence and Anita" which centered on the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings involving Anita Hill. Liberal-minded television comedy at its peak, thanks to that genius, creator-producer-writer Linda Bloodworth.

Emmerdale

My favorite British soap. And I didn't start watching it until January 2017. Fortunately I've been able to go back and look at episodes from the mid-90s that are currently on Amazon Prime. 

Gunsmoke

I prefer the early half-hour episodes, especially the more adult stories written by a young Sam Peckinpah. Dennis Weaver was brilliant as Chester and he worked well with James Arness.

Hazel

Shirley Booth was excellent as a majordomo with heart, going toe to toe with an unenlightened conservative boss (beautifully played by Don DeFore).

Here's Lucy

My favorite Lucille Ball sitcom. The guest stars are great. But at its heart, it's an amiable comedy about a family in the suburbs, with a single working class mother trying to survive. This series has a lot more realism than Ball's previous sitcoms because of her authentic interactions with her real-life children Lucie and Desi Jr. Top three episodes: "Lucy the Fixer" where Lucy tries to fix the electrical wiring in the house owned by Uncle Harry (Gale Gordon) and ultimately destroys his living room; "Lucy and Donny Osmond" where young Donny develops a crush on Kim (Lucie's character); and "With Viv as a Friend Who Needs an Enemy?" which features Vivian Vance's last guest appearance as Lucy's long-time frenemy.

Hunter

Fred Dryer and Stepfanie Kramer share a special chemistry. The show was firing on all cylinders during the Roy Huggins era. But there are still some very good episodes during the later seasons. I love Season 5's "Heir of Neglect" where we learn at the end that a young boy's parents did not die because of a home invasion, but that the kid (Chad Allen) himself killed his parents because they had no time for him. There's also a good one from the last season where a schizophrenic woman (Ellen Wheeler) kills a cop and we see how the slain officer's death affects Hunter and the whole department. And there's a three-part episode produced by Huggins where a corrupt judge (Robert Reed) is tied in with a Satanic cult. This program had some very gritty thought provoking stories. 

Knots Landing

Maybe the best night time soap of the 80s and early 90s. It was more consistent than big guns Dallas and Dynasty. The best episode is the one where Constance McCashin's character Laura receives a terminal diagnosis and goes off to a cancer clinic to die. It's called 'The Gift of Life' and we see how her exit has this huge impact on her friends in the cul-de-sac, her self-centered husband (William Devane) and ex-husband (John Pleshette), as well as her three young children. She makes sure her baby daughter is baptized then at the end, she just drives off to the clinic alone. And that final shot, where Laura can barely see the road ahead of her because the tears are flooding down her face, is very powerful. We never see Laura alive again on the show. And during her eight and half years on Knots Landing Constance McCashin never had a crying scene. She always played Laura as a self-deprecating but wise woman. So to watch her succumb to her emotions in that final scene, facing her mortality, it is sublime.

Kojak

Film noir transferred to TV, 70s style, with New York and Telly Savalas as the main attractions. You can't ask for anything more!

Magnum P.I.

I would occasionally get annoyed with John Hillerman's fake British accent, but I love the interactions of the four guys and how Magnum's cases don't always go as you might expect. The Hawaiian scenery is great too. Recently I watched a season 1 episode on Amazon Prime called "Adelaide" with guest star Christine Belford. I loved how sincere Tom Selleck was in his scenes with Belford, especially because Belford was playing a 32 year old virgin from Iowa that had a crush on Magnum. So while the main crimes are playing out, we get this very tender character study. And that's what the show always did so well.

Maude

Bea Arthur's best work. And Bill Macy was perfect as her husband. This show explored topics that TV programs today are still afraid to tackle. 

The Rebel

This is Route 66 western style. We have an ex-soldier (Nick Adams) wandering the country post-Civil War while maintaining a "post" Conferederate stance. Adams does a good job and some of the guest stars are fantastic. I love the episode where Claude Akins is a crafty bounty hunter, and the one where Richard Jaeckel needs Johnny Yuma's help finding a brother that's dead.

Route 66

Wanderlust and innocence just before the Kennedy assassination, when innocence would be lost forever. All the on-location filming lets us glimpse what America was like during that important time in history. My favorite episode is the one where guest star Ruth Roman plays the mentally unstable mother of Marty Milner's character.

Search for Tomorrow

I watched the last few years (1982 to 1986) on NBC when I was a kid. Not every story worked, but what set this American soap ahead of the others was all the family counseling scenes that were included. Plus there was an emphasis on friendship, not the cattiness we find on today's soaps.

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19 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

when did I ever get to do my homework?  LOL

My father solved that problem when I was in 10th grade and flunking algebra.  Took out his pocket knife and literally cut the power cord to the TV.  He would wire it back together on Friday night and then disconnect it again on Sunday night.  Back in early 60's with OTA antenna and black and white the disconnecting and reconnecting probably had little effect on performance of TV.   I did pass for the semester, but he thought it worked so well, he continued to do it for rest of school year.

Naturally my mother and sister were upset that they could not watch TV because of me, but they watched very little anyway.  Not to mention that he often worked night shift and I knew how to rewire it and then unwire it while he was gone.  Oh, and we only got two stations.

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I'm with TOP.  WAY too many shows over too many decades to make a limited list.  And since the thread title mentions "classic" TV shows, some have taken "classic" to mean something other than old.  Now, ME?

Well, I took the "old" route, as it's the more common "classic" path most follow.  

I can't speak much to this century, since my interest in TV fare is(was) mostly comedies.  Two in particular, and both ABC shows...

MODERN FAMILY    and

THE MIDDLE

Plus the last few seasons of a '90's series,...

THAT '70'S SHOW

Then also the remaining seasons of the LAW AND ORDER line-up. (including SVU and CI).

BURN NOTICE and IN PLAIN SIGHT  filled some of the drama void earlier in the 2000's.  Along with SYFY's  GONE GIRL and BEING HUMAN for the few seasons they lasted.  And SYFY's  game show TOTAL BLACKOUT was gone sooner than I liked if you ask me.  :(

Sepiatone

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5 minutes ago, TheCid said:

My father solved that problem when I was in 10th grade and flunking algebra.  Took out his pocket knife and literally cut the power cord to the TV.  He would wire it back together on Friday night and then disconnect it again on Sunday night.  Back in early 60's with OTA antenna and black and white the disconnecting and reconnecting probably had little effect on performance of TV.   I did pass for the semester, but he thought it worked so well, he continued to do it for rest of school year.

Naturally my mother and sister were upset that they could not watch TV because of me, but they watched very little anyway.  Not to mention that he often worked night shift and I knew how to rewire it and then unwire it while he was gone.  Oh, and we only got two stations.

My parents never went that route. We had 2 tv's, one was in the living room the other in my sister's and my bedroom. At night when shows that were on past bedtime and my parent's went to sleep, we would watch shows like Ben Casey, etc. LOL  My sister was a very smart girl and skipped the 8th grade so our bad behavior had no effect on her schoolwork.  Just like Dargo, I slid by with a B average.

When  my 2 kids were growing up, neither one had a tv in their rooms and they grew up not watching much tv. I purposely did that so there was no temptation for my kids to repeat those bad habits. I'm glad I didn't miss out on so many great shows. somehow I still read books, played outside, rode my bike, roller skated, saw friends, etc. and yes, I still did my homework, maybe not as diligently as I could have but it was a lot more fun to watch tv :)

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8 hours ago, TheCid said:

My father solved that problem when I was in 10th grade and flunking algebra.  Took out his pocket knife and literally cut the power cord to the TV.  He would wire it back together on Friday night and then disconnect it again on Sunday night.  Back in early 60's with OTA antenna and black and white the disconnecting and reconnecting probably had little effect on performance of TV.   I did pass for the semester, but he thought it worked so well, he continued to do it for rest of school year.

Naturally my mother and sister were upset that they could not watch TV because of me, but they watched very little anyway.  Not to mention that he often worked night shift and I knew how to rewire it and then unwire it while he was gone.  Oh, and we only got two stations.

Wow! What a rough childhood there, Cid!

Only two channels you say?! Boy, that IS rough!

(...not to rub it in here, but we Angelenos got SEVEN of 'em back then, ya know!)

LOL

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So lavender...would I be correct in assuming that that double post of yours up there was in honor of the old summer rerun season, and unlike how the Smothers Brothers had Glen Campbell take over for 'em starting around June???

(...naaaah, probably not, huh...probably was just a computer glitch, huh)  ;)

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12 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Wow! What a rough childhood there, Cid!

Only two channels you say?! Boy, that IS rough!

(...not to rub it in here, but we Angelenos got SEVEN of 'em back then, ya know!)

LOL

I lived between two relatively large media markets growing up and we were a bit too far to pick up their signals reliably by antenna.  We only had 2 local stations, but we had what's now called cable TV.  Back then it was called Community Antenna TV.  We had a whopping 12 channels, most imported from 3 other markets by microwave relay.

My parents had cable since they bought their first TV set, in 1955.

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11 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I lived between two relatively large media markets growing up and we were a bit too far to pick up their signals reliably by antenna.  We only had 2 local stations, but we had what's now called cable TV.  Back then it was called Community Antenna TV.  We had a whopping 12 channels, most imported from 3 other markets by microwave relay.

My parents had cable since they bought their first TV set, in 1955.

Well, you DO know the opposite of having a "rough childhood" is having a pampered one, don't ya Tex?!  ;)

Wow, 12 channels there in the Lone Star State ya say, huh?!

(...if I had had that, I'd have probably turned in even LESS homework than I did back then and my GPA probably would've have been any higher than a 'C')

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27 minutes ago, Dargo said:

So lavender...would I be correct in assuming that that double post of yours up there was in honor of the old summer rerun season, and unlike how the Smothers Brothers had Glen Campbell take over for 'em starting around June???

(...naaaah, probably not, huh...probably was just a computer glitch, huh)  ;)

No, my post was so good it deserved a duplicate post lol  Yes, a computer glitch, just saw it and deleted it ;)

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12 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

No, my post was so good it deserved a duplicate post lol  Yes, a computer glitch, just saw it and deleted it ;)

So, kind'a like that city you grew up in back there then, eh?!

(..."the town so nice they named it twice", right?!) ;)

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20 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

1. I LOVE LUCY

2. THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW

3. THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW

4. SEINFELD

5. LEAVE IT TO BEAVER 

6. THE TWILIGHT ZONE

7. FAMILY TIES

8.  HAPPY DAYS

9. BONANZA

10. MR. ED

11. THE HONEYMOONERS

12. BATMAN

13. FATHER KNOWS BEST

14. THE ADVENTURES OF OZZIE AND HARRIET

15. EVERYBODY LOVES RAYMOND

 

Thank you! At last a Bonanza fan!

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So glad The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet was listed. Loved that show and LOVED Ricky and love this song

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1. Mary Tyler Moore Show

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2. Seinfeld

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3. Dick Van Dyke Show

FlawedHandyGoldeneye-small.gif

4. SCTV

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5. Rockford Files

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6. Avengers ('66-'68)

949855ccf5b2625ee1ea4bf32b844e43.gif

7. Tonight Show With Johnny Carson

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8. Maverick

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9. Monty Python's Flying Circus

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10. Moonlighting (Seasons 1 to 3)

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11. WKRP in Cincinatti

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12. Dean Martin Show

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13. Taxi

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14. Rifleman

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and, ,just to throw in a current show that few on this board will know, Murdoch Mysteries (it's a Canadian turn-of-the-century detective series about to go into Season 14)

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I was one of those kids who didn't like Sundays. The morning and afternoon were alright, but around

eight o'clock in the evening I would get a queasy feeling because I hadn't done my homework and

had spent the weekend goofing off. During the winter months I hoped for a large overnight snowstorm

to occur, but it very rarely did. Today Sundays are wonderfully carefree. 

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That 60 Minutes stopwatch ticking away was always a depressing reminder to me that the weekend was over.

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19 hours ago, TopBilled said:

It's almost impossible to create such a narrow list when there are literally hundreds of programs across genres (and decades) to choose from!

But I will list 15 that have meaning for me, and I will do them in alphabetical order so I don't have to exactly rank them.

The Andy Griffith Show

I have a love-hate relationship with this show. I wrote a scathing review for it on the IMDb, because as a whole I think the show encourages conformity at the expense of individuality which I can't abide. Plus there are no storylines for any black characters, so it's definitely a white man's version of an idealized south. But I do think that despite its suffocating conservative framework, there are some valuable character-driven episodes. I prefer the post-Don Knotts episodes in color. I feel like Knotts' character Barney dominated too much especially in seasons 3-5. After he leaves, the show refocuses itself around Griffith and the various townsfolk. To me the main character is Mayberry itself, not Andy or Barney or any specific member of the cast.

Cybill

One of the best written sitcoms of the mid-to-late 90s. A classic blend of feminism, heart and humor. The show has some of the best drawn characters, they're all unique and serve a specific purpose. An excellent episode is the one where Cybill (Cybill Shepherd) has done an advertising campaign for shoes, and she realizes that they put her face on top of a thinner, younger model. Of course she and Mary Ann (Christine Baranski) vandalize the billboard to make a statement. Rebelliousness and mayhem aside, it's a thought-provoking thesis about self-image and how that image is conveyed to the world. All the episodes discuss vanity and self-worth. You can find the entire series currently on Amazon Prime.

Designing Women

A more sophisticated southern version of The Golden Girls. Best episode is the one where they address Delta Burke's weight gain-- "They Shoot Fat Women, Don't They?" which earned Delta a much-deserved Emmy nomination as Best Actress. I never met Delta, who was fired at the end of season 5, but I spent almost all of season 6 on the set as a production intern and that happened to be the year the show had its highest ratings. The best episode from season 6 is "The Strange Case of Clarence and Anita" which centered on the Clarence Thomas confirmation hearings involving Anita Hill. Liberal-minded television comedy at its peak, thanks to that genius, creator-producer-writer Linda Bloodworth.

Emmerdale

My favorite British soap. And I didn't start watching it until January 2017. Fortunately I've been able to go back and look at episodes from the mid-90s that are currently on Amazon Prime. 

Gunsmoke

I prefer the early half-hour episodes, especially the more adult stories written by a young Sam Peckinpah. Dennis Weaver was brilliant as Chester and he worked well with James Arness.

Hazel

Shirley Booth was excellent as a majordomo with heart, going toe to toe with an unenlightened conservative boss (beautifully played by Don DeFore).

Here's Lucy

My favorite Lucille Ball sitcom. The guest stars are great. But at its heart, it's an amiable comedy about a family in the suburbs, with a single working class mother trying to survive. This series has a lot more realism than Ball's previous sitcoms because of her authentic interactions with her real-life children Lucie and Desi Jr. Top three episodes: "Lucy the Fixer" where Lucy tries to fix the electrical wiring in the house owned by Uncle Harry (Gale Gordon) and ultimately destroys his living room; "Lucy and Donny Osmond" where young Donny develops a crush on Kim (Lucie's character); and "With Viv as a Friend Who Needs an Enemy?" which features Vivian Vance's last guest appearance as Lucy's long-time frenemy.

Hunter

Fred Dryer and Stepfanie Kramer share a special chemistry. The show was firing on all cylinders during the Roy Huggins era. But there are still some very good episodes during the later seasons. I love Season 5's "Heir of Neglect" where we learn at the end that a young boy's parents did not die because of a home invasion, but that the kid (Chad Allen) himself killed his parents because they had no time for him. There's also a good one from the last season where a schizophrenic woman (Ellen Wheeler) kills a cop and we see how the slain officer's death affects Hunter and the whole department. And there's a three-part episode produced by Huggins where a corrupt judge (Robert Reed) is tied in with a Satanic cult. This program had some very gritty thought provoking stories. 

Knots Landing

Maybe the best night time soap of the 80s and early 90s. It was more consistent than big guns Dallas and Dynasty. The best episode is the one where Constance McCashin's character Laura receives a terminal diagnosis and goes off to a cancer clinic to die. It's called 'The Gift of Life' and we see how her exit has this huge impact on her friends in the cul-de-sac, her self-centered husband (William Devane) and ex-husband (John Pleshette), as well as her three young children. She makes sure her baby daughter is baptized then at the end, she just drives off to the clinic alone. And that final shot, where Laura can barely see the road ahead of her because the tears are flooding down her face, is very powerful. We never see Laura alive again on the show. And during her eight and half years on Knots Landing Constance McCashin never had a crying scene. She always played Laura as a self-deprecating but wise woman. So to watch her succumb to her emotions in that final scene, facing her mortality, it is sublime.

Kojak

Film noir transferred to TV, 70s style, with New York and Telly Savalas as the main attractions. You can't ask for anything more!

Magnum P.I.

I would occasionally get annoyed with John Hillerman's fake British accent, but I love the interactions of the four guys and how Magnum's cases don't always go as you might expect. The Hawaiian scenery is great too. Recently I watched a season 1 episode on Amazon Prime called "Adelaide" with guest star Christine Belford. I loved how sincere Tom Selleck was in his scenes with Belford, especially because Belford was playing a 32 year old virgin from Iowa that had a crush on Magnum. So while the main crimes are playing out, we get this very tender character study. And that's what the show always did so well.

Maude

Bea Arthur's best work. And Bill Macy was perfect as her husband. This show explored topics that TV programs today are still afraid to tackle. 

The Rebel

This is Route 66 western style. We have an ex-soldier (Nick Adams) wandering the country post-Civil War while maintaining a "post" Conferederate stance. Adams does a good job and some of the guest stars are fantastic. I love the episode where Claude Akins is a crafty bounty hunter, and the one where Richard Jaeckel needs Johnny Yuma's help finding a brother that's dead.

Route 66

Wanderlust and innocence just before the Kennedy assassination, when innocence would be lost forever. All the on-location filming lets us glimpse what America was like during that important time in history. My favorite episode is the one where guest star Ruth Roman plays the mentally unstable mother of Marty Milner's character.

Search for Tomorrow

I watched the last few years (1982 to 1986) on NBC when I was a kid. Not every story worked, but what set this American soap ahead of the others was all the family counseling scenes that were included. Plus there was an emphasis on friendship, not the cattiness we find on today's soaps.

TopBilled,, as usual your first did your homework!

But, what qualifies as a subject matter, 20 or 25yrs like a car?

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