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Sepiatone

Glen Miller glitch....

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8 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I just love the music. When I was a young girl, ( and don't ask how many years ago that was, Dargo),  my boyfriend took me to see the Glenn Miller orchestra, or what was left of them and we danced and had a wonderful time.  Many old timers gave us looks as were were only in our twenties.  It's just a shame they don't have those venues anymore. 

LOL

Well first here Janet, would I do that? Okay, okay, maybe. ;)

And secondly, one of my fellow part-time shuttle drivers for a little outfit around here in the Sedona and Cottonwood area of northern Arizona and where we transit people to and from Phoenix's Sky Harbor Airport is named Randy. And, Randy also plays drums for the modern traveling Harry James Orchestra...

http://harryjamesband.com/

That's Randy top-center behind his drum set in the above link's photo of the band.

He quite often takes time off from his driving gig to travel with the band, and he told me a few months back, and before all this Covid stuff,  that they had quite the set of one-night-stand shows through the midwestern cities of Chicago, Indianapolis and Cincinnati.

And so evidently there still ARE these types of venues out there somewhere.

(...and now...so how long ago exactly WAS that Glenn Miller thing you talked about earlier???) ;)

LOL

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18 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I just love the music. When I was a young girl, ( and don't ask how many years ago that was, Dargo),  my boyfriend took me to see the Glenn Miller orchestra, or what was left of them and we danced and had a wonderful time.  Many old timers gave us looks as were were only in our twenties.  It's just a shame they don't have those venues anymore. 

Not trying to give anything away Janet, but 'round HERE there were a few high school and small college auditoriums that would feature still working old bands, like DUKE ELLINGTON's band led by son MERCER ELLINGTON, and the Livonia, MI high school auditorium that for a few years in the '70's had WOODY HERMAN and his YOUNG THUNDERING HERDS with the still alive Woody at the helm.  I took my Mom, a Woody fan since she was 15, to see him in Livonia for her birthday in '77. And BTW----

Since signing off the iNet yesterday and after some discussion of this here, I dug out my CD copy of BENNY GOODMAN at Carnegie Hall and spent all afternoon in "swing" bliss!  AND driven by Krupa!  ;)   And too, wondered why the STEVE ALLEN bio of Goodman wasn't added to the night's line-up.

Sepiatone

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On the Essentials thread, Jlewis and I spent two weeks covering Glenn Miller movies.

March 21

SCREEN.jpeg

March 28

SCREEN.jpeg

If you've seen the later biopic but haven't seen the earlier film that features Miller in a key supporting role, I highly recommend it.

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I love this movie.  Jimmy Stewart is great as Glen Miller and I forget who plays his wife.  It’s someone we all know though.  Who is it again?  Thursday night or whenever it was during TCM Spotlight On Jazz In Film was the second time I saw it and before I saw it for the very first time.  I had no idea Glen Miller and is orchestra played that music we know that has been featured in all kinds of other movies and stuff.  That’s really neat.  In Big where Josh and his girlfriend are at the dance.  That was the music they were dancing to.  In Dennis The Menace at Mr and Mrs Wilson’s garden party.  That music was playing at their garden party and in the Disney’s The Parent Trap remake.  That same music was playing at the hotel.  That’s really neat and Jimmy Stewart was a really wonderful actor.  Wasn’t he and the one who played Glen Miller’s wife too.  Wasn’t she?

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30 minutes ago, David Guercio said:

I love this movie.  Jimmy Stewart is great as Glen Miller and I forget who plays his wife.  It’s someone we all know though. 

Yes.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.40.37 AM.jpeg

She is someone famous.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.26.17 AM.jpeg

It's June Allyson.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.31.08 AM.jpeg

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28 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yes.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.40.37 AM.jpeg

She is someone famous.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.26.17 AM.jpeg

It's June Allyson.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.31.08 AM.jpeg

AND, our old buddy DownGoesFrazier's absolute favorite actress of all time! 

LOL

(...naaaah, not really of course...OOOH, did he ever despise her)

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32 minutes ago, Dargo said:

AND, our old buddy DownGoesFrazier's absolute favorite actress of all time! 

LOL

(...naaaah, not really of course...OOOH, did he ever despise her)

Yeah he had a hard time when she was Star of the Month. :) 

***

Screen Shot 2020-06-14 at 12.56.09 PM

June Allyson & James Stewart costarred in three films, all big hits, at three different studios:

THE STRATTON STORY (1949) at MGM.

THE GLENN MILLER STORY (1954) at Universal.

STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND (1955) at Paramount.

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13 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Yeah he had a hard time when she was Star of the Month. :) 

***

Yeah, I always envisioned him happening upon June in some movie and then having the very same reaction Kramer on Seinfeld had to Mary Hart's voice. 

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16 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yeah, I always envisioned him happening upon June in some movie and then having the very same reaction Kramer on Seinfeld had to Mary Hart's voice. 

People now don't put June Allyson in the same league as her contemporaries (and friends) Judy Garland and Liz Taylor. 

But the truth is she had more hits than they did during the post-war period and MGM kept her on the payroll from 1943 to 1957 (two full 7-year contracts). 

When Stewart started freelancing he requested her as his leading lady at those other studios. So MGM was loaning her out when she was still making a lot of money for them. She was a hot commodity, especially from '47 to '55, and it is part of the reason she deserves to be remembered as a star. Audiences of her generation loved her.

She was a wealthy career woman that moviegoers saw as a middle class stay-at-home wife and mother.

Screen Shot 2020-03-28 at 11.39.12 AM.jpeg

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On 6/14/2020 at 11:08 AM, TopBilled said:

On the Essentials thread, Jlewis and I spent two weeks covering Glenn Miller movies.

March 21

SCREEN.jpeg

March 28

SCREEN.jpeg

If you've seen the later biopic but haven't seen the earlier film that features Miller in a key supporting role, I highly recommend it.

In addition to ORCHESTRA WIVES, I'd also recommend SUN VALLEY SERENADE if you'd like to see Miller and his orchestra on screen.   The plot of ORCHESTRA WIVES focuses more on the band than does SUN VALLEY SERENADE, which stars Sonja Henie and focuses more on her skating (and even some skiing).   But both movies are very entertaining and show the Glenn Miller Orchestra playing some of their best tunes.

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1 hour ago, BingFan said:

In addition to ORCHESTRA WIVES, I'd also recommend SUN VALLEY SERENADE if you'd like to see Miller and his orchestra on screen.   The plot of ORCHESTRA WIVES focuses more on the band than does SUN VALLEY SERENADE, which stars Sonja Henie and focuses more on her skating (and even some skiing).   But both movies are very entertaining and show the Glenn Miller Orchestra playing some of their best tunes.

Thanks for mentioning SUN VALLEY SERENADE. Jlewis and I covered that one in January when we focused on a few of Henie's ice skating musicals. 

Glenn Miller and his band were under contract at 20th Century Fox when the war began. Of course they would start traveling abroad to entertain the troops, and Miller died during one of those trips.

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Heh Kevin Whitehead has been plugging his new book "Play The Way You Feel: The Essential Guide To Jazz Stories On Film" on NPR's Fresh Air in conjunction with TCM's "Jazz on Film" spotlight.

Here's his defense of the much maligned  jazz biopic:

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/16/878238994/in-defense-of-jazz-biopics-melodramas-and-morality-tales-set-to-music

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Thanks, TikiSoo, I enjoyed the article. I was not aware of some of the more recent jazz biopics that Kevin Whitehead mentions. And you gotta love the part about who Ethan Hawke as Chet Baker returning in the movie to his parents' ranch in Oklahoma--only they were actually living in Redondo Beach, CA, which doesn't have quite the same vibe.

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Heh Kevin Whitehead has been plugging his new book "Play The Way You Feel: The Essential Guide To Jazz Stories On Film" on NPR's Fresh Air in conjunction with TCM's "Jazz on Film" spotlight.

Here's his defense of the much maligned  jazz biopic:

https://www.npr.org/2020/06/16/878238994/in-defense-of-jazz-biopics-melodramas-and-morality-tales-set-to-music

Thanks for posting this!     My two favorite subjects jazz and film.

Note that at the jazz forum I'm letting fellow jazz musicians know about this TCM spotlight (and TCM in general) but I have warned them about lack of accuracy.

Since the folks at this forum have so much knowledge hey tend to nit-pick more so then the so called average viewer.

I tell them;  like music itself,  focus on the vibe of the film,  what it is saying about the essence of the musicians,,,,,,  and not so much on trivial historical inaccuracies.  (of course what is 'trivial' to one person,  may not be to another and this is often the heart of the debate).

 

 

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39 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Thanks, TikiSoo, I enjoyed the article. I was not aware of some of the more recent jazz biopics that Kevin Whitehead mentions. And you gotta love the part about who Ethan Hawke as Chet Baker returning in the movie to his parents' ranch in Oklahoma--only they were actually living in Redondo Beach, CA, which doesn't have quite the same vibe.

I don't think his parents were ranchers either.   In 1940, they lived in the 1300 block of North Lottie Avenue in Oklahoma City, and that isn't (and wasn't then) ranchland.   It's less than half a mile from the state capitol complex, and today, is adjacent to a large hospital/health care complex.

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2 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I don't think his parents were ranchers either.   In 1940, they lived in the 1300 block of North Lottie Avenue in Oklahoma City, and that isn't (and wasn't then) ranchland.   It's less than half a mile from the state capitol complex, and today, is adjacent to a large hospital/health care complex.

I haven't seen the film,  but I assume a ranch in rural Oklahoma was selected to communicate the type of place that might help someone with a drug problem overcome his habit.

 Going to Southern California,   so close to Hollywood,  celebrities and a place with an overall more 'active'  lifestyle then most,,,,,  isn't the best place to kick a drug habit!  (in fact more like one of the best places to score some good stuff,,  man.).

If as kingrat implies this historical inaccuracy in the film did jive-with-the-vibe,  then that can be problematic.      If the location had an impact on Baker's ability to recover (or at least be a functioning drug user),   then I would fine that as being problematic.    If not,  (i.e.  staying with his parents helped 'ground' him,  and location was mostly irrelevant), than that type of change is mostly irrelevant.

At the jazz forum we were discussing the tour of Stan Getz and Chet Baker Stockholm concerts in 1983.   Both were in fine form and each surprised each other.  I.e. both were wondering if the other would be able to function enough to pull the event off.      They each were;  This is one of the last examples of how these two jazz musicians approached music,  especially their solos,  in much different ways.  

 

 

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14 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 Going to Southern California,   so close to Hollywood,  celebrities and a place with an overall more 'active'  lifestyle then most,,,,,  isn't the best place to kick a drug habit!  (in fact more like one of the best places to score some good stuff,,  man.).

 

 

Hanging around jazz hep cats probably didn't help in that endeavor either (no disrespect intended)... 🙂

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Actually, I liked that era of jazz and popular music so much it(and being a long time Danny Kaye fan) is likely why I preferred the movie remake A SONG IS BORN over the original story  BALL OF FIRE.  

Sepiatone

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42 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Actually, I liked that era of jazz and popular music so much it(and being a long time Danny Kaye fan) is likely why I preferred the movie remake A SONG IS BORN over the original story  BALL OF FIRE.  

Sepiatone

I like both films,  but yea,  due to my love of jazz and the era of music in the film A Song Is Born,     IF I had to only watch one of the two again,,,,  it would be that one (but I do like the actors in Ball of Fire more,,,,).

 

 

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June Allyson.  That’s who played his wife in this movie.  She and Jimmy Stewart were both great in this movie.  Weren’t they and they were great in all the movies they did together too.  Weren’t they and he was a really wonderful actor too.  Wasn’t he and she was a really wonderful actress too.  Wasn’t she?  They were both really wonderful stars.  Weren’t they?

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22 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Actually, I liked that era of jazz and popular music so much it(and being a long time Danny Kaye fan) is likely why I preferred the movie remake A SONG IS BORN over the original story  BALL OF FIRE.  

Sepiatone

I'm torn when it comes to BALL OF FIRE and A SONG IS BORN.   I like both movies, which share a very entertaining story.

For me, on the plus side for BALL OF FIRE are the leads -- Barbara Stanwyck and Gary Cooper -- and  the great character actors playing the professors.

In A SONG IS BORN, the strengths are Danny Kaye (I've been a fan since I was a kid watching his 60s TV show) and the all-star jazz musicians playing some great music.

Although I do like A SONG IS BORN, I find BALL OF FIRE to be the better movie, in large part because Stanwyck and the supporting cast, as actors, edge out their counterparts in A SONG IS BORN.  Stanwyck is simply a better actor than Virginia Mayo, and while Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Benny Carter, Tommy Dorsey, Lionel Hampton, and the other "professors" in A SONG IS BORN were certainly at the top of the jazz world in the 40s, they weren't a match as actors for the professors in BALL OF FIRE, including S.Z. Sakall, Henry Travers, Oscar Homolka, Leonid Kinskey, and Richard Haydn.  (And as much as I love Danny Kaye, Gary Cooper easily did just as well in the same role.)  For jazz fans, BALL OF FIRE featured Gene Krupa and his orchestra, including trumpeter Roy Eldridge.

For what it's worth, when Howard Hawks, who directed both films, was asked why he remade BALL OF FIRE as A SONG IS BORN, he admitted it was just for the money.  (If I remember correctly, he said that in the book-length interview with Joseph McBride, HAWKS ON HAWKS.)

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Well kid, (and I say "kid" since I watched Danny Kaye's '60's variety show BECAUSE I was a Kaye fan already!) we all have our druthers.  And I'd druther watch A SONG IS BORN, since 1.  I never warmed up much to Stanwyck as an actress. and 2.  Coop cast as a linguistics scholar was just too absurd to me. Sorta like casting MARGARET HAMILTON in the role of a BATHING BEAUTY!  :wacko:  And Kaye, although never getting beyond an amateur status as a musician, did have enough understanding of music to make his role believable.   

Sepiatone

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34 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Well kid, (and I say "kid" since I watched Danny Kaye's '60's variety show BECAUSE I was a Kaye fan already!) we all have our druthers.  And I'd druther watch A SONG IS BORN, since 1.  I never warmed up much to Stanwyck as an actress. and 2.  Coop cast as a linguistics scholar was just too absurd to me. Sorta like casting MARGARET HAMILTON in the role of a BATHING BEAUTY!  :wacko:  And Kaye, although never getting beyond an amateur status as a musician, did have enough understanding of music to make his role believable.   

Sepiatone

Good points, especially the last one about Kaye's musical talent.  I'm sure you probably remember that although Danny apparently couldn't read music, he was invited to conduct major symphony orchestras in the 60s and 70s, usually as a charity fundraiser.   According to Wikipedia: Kaye's "ability with an orchestra was mentioned by Dimitri Mitropoulos, then conductor of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra. After Kaye's appearance Mitropoulos remarked, 'Here is a man who is not musically trained, who cannot even read music and he gets more out of my orchestra than I have.'"

Here's a video of Kaye conducting the National Symphony Orchestra in 1962:  https://www.kennedy-center.org/video/center/other/2020/danny-kaye/

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Yeah, I've seen Kaye do that shtick with other orchestras over the years on PBS.  And speaking of the untrained in music( and sorry for the highjack)..

THIS untrained formally musician was famous for composing a multi covered tune  (Steve Allen)

Sepiatone

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