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Sepiatone

Glen Miller glitch....

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Yeah, I've seen Kaye do that shtick with other orchestras over the years on PBS.  And speaking of the untrained in music( and sorry for the highjack)..

THIS untrained formally musician was famous for composing a multi covered tune  (Steve Allen)

Sepiatone

Apologies for continuing the off-topic discussion -- but I've always loved Steve Allen's "This Could Be the Start of Something Big," which was an impressive musical achievement for someone who was less formally trained.

I had never seen this outstanding video before.  I was nicely surprised when Sinatra -- in an iconic pose under a street lamp and holding a raincoat -- joined in the song for a small part.  I don't believe he ever recorded this excellent song, so I was glad to hear him singing it, albeit briefly.

Another great version is Count Basie's.  Here's a live recording from the Sands in Vegas, circa 1966, when Basie was opening for and then backing Sinatra:

 

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Grant Green liked the Steve Allen song enough to record it;   I like this hip version and play along to it often:

 

 

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2 minutes ago, BingFan said:

Apologies for continuing the off-topic discussion -- but I've always loved Steve Allen's "This Must Be the Start of Something Big," which was an impressive musical achievement for someone who was less formally trained.

I had never seen this outstanding video before.  I was nicely surprised when Sinatra -- in an iconic pose under a street lamp and holding a raincoat -- joined in the song for a small part.  I don't believe he ever recorded this excellent song, so I was glad to hear him singing it, albeit briefly.

Another great version is Count Basie's.  Here's a live recording from the Sands in Vegas, circa 1966, when Basie was opening for and then backing Sinatra:

 

That B&W video is basically taking you on a tour of NBC's Burbank studios, which were connected together in a central warehouse area, where props and sets were stored.  NBC moved out of their historic west coast facility a few years back, moving in with their Universal corporate brethren.

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16 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

That B&W video is basically taking you on a tour of NBC's Burbank studios, which were connected together in a central warehouse area, where props and sets were stored.  NBC moved out of their historic west coast facility a few years back, moving in with their Universal corporate brethren.

Interesting!  I was wondering where that sequence was filmed.  It must have been a challenge for the TV camera to track through that large space (or were they using a film camera?).

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1 hour ago, BingFan said:

Interesting!  I was wondering where that sequence was filmed.  It must have been a challenge for the TV camera to track through that large space (or were they using a film camera?).

It was using an NTSC TV camera.  The tracking through the facility is what makes it such a technical achievement for the day, as huge cables would have to be manipulated through the entire sequence.  I suppose in a way it's TV's version of Hitchcock's Rope trick.

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On 6/12/2020 at 12:54 PM, BingFan said:

True, but one of the Modernaires did follow Miller into the Army. 

After Miller received his commission in the Army in late '42, the Mods continued to perform stateside with Tex Beneke and Marion Hutton (billed as "The Glenn Miller Singers").  It was during this period (about 1943) that two of the original Modernaires, Bill Conway and Hal Dickinson, had a disagreement which resulted in Conway quitting the group.  He enlisted in the Army to join Miller's military band, but by the time he enlisted --- in the regular Army --- Capt. Miller had been transferred into the Army Air Forces.  Conway found himself training and drilling like a regular GI and sent several frantic letters and telegrams to Miller pleading for a transfer to Miller's unit.  Wouldn't you know it, by the time Conway's transfer was approved, Miller was gone, declared dead in a crash over the English Channel, so Conway and Miller were never reunited.  Conway also didn't get to sing with Miller's Army Air Forces Band.  Miller had already formed a vocal group, the Crew Chiefs, and their roster was full by the time Conway arrived in France.    In his memoir My Memories of the Modernaires, Conway said he contributed some vocal arrangements for the Crew Chiefs (he had arranged all of the Modernaires' vocal charts while they were with Miller --- and even before that).  He also played guitar with the Army Air Forces Band, something he had also done with Miller's civilian band.  

Conway's life took a sad turn after the war.  He found himself unable to rejoin the Modernaires or financially profit from his role as a founding member because of the rift between Dickinson and himself (In a fit of anger and depression, Conway had foolishly signed over all rights to the group to Dickinson at the time of their 1943 breakup.).  He worked briefly as a vocal arranger for the Hired Hand network radio program in the late '40s and then later had a short stint as an arranger for Ray Anthony's band (Anthony was another Miller Orchestra alumnus).  But he never again held a steady job in show business.  He also suffered from a nervous disorder, which he attributed to a bombing he'd survived during the war, and in his later years was confined to a wheelchair.  

Conway died in 1991 in Los Angeles.  He was last surviving original Modernaire --- Hal Dickinson died in 1970; Chuck Goldstein in 1974; Ralph Brewster in 1990.

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