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chaya bat woof woof

Play to Film or Book to Film

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Watched Petrified Forest on TCM this afternoon.  Great film and learned that in one ending, one of the characters lived.  My Mom saw a horrible version of the Robert Sherwood play it is based on in Canada (Niagara on the Lake) over ten years ago.  This got me to think about plays that were better on the stage rather than the film version plus another topic:  plays/books and did the film meet your expectations.

I've read all of Dickens' novels and think Great Expectations and David Copperfield were both very good.

As far as plays, I would have loved to have seen Robert Alda and Sam Levine in the movie.

Gene Kelley was too confident for On the Town v. character in the movie.

There are movies that are in the works and movies I could read but never watch (an example, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo). 

Cloud Atlas was too weird to turn into a movie.  I keep reading about an adaptation of Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon.  Might not work as a movie.

I might have posted this before, but the pandemic and feeling like I'm in Groundhog Day or a looping movie, can't tell.

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22 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Watched Petrified Forest on TCM this afternoon.  Great film and learned that in one ending, one of the characters lived.  My Mom saw a horrible version of the Robert Sherwood play it is based on in Canada (Niagara on the Lake) over ten years ago.

The 1936 The Petrified Forest is my favorite film (well Leslie Howard and than Bogie are my favorite actors,  and Bette Davis is my favorite actress being a primary reason,  but I just really love the dialog in the film):     As for "one of the character lived":  did you mean to say one of the criminals?     Because in the 1936 version all of the hostages live (as far as we know),   except for the Leslie Howard character.      

Anyhow,  I just love this film especially the first part where Howard and Davis first meet and then later go talk on the roof.    Just the way they each talk is magic to me; E.g. the way Howard says Bar-B-Q,,,,,.

 I have yet to see the 1955  T.V. version with Bogie (still the lead criminal),  and Bacall and Henry Fonda. 

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A blurry copy can be viewed  on YT:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riylfh_9ir8

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I didn't realize there was another version of THE PETRIFIED FOREST. I might have to go and watch that one.

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Chaya, there's been adaptations of books I've read in which the film treatments were better.  Like THE NATURAL,  FORREST GUMP  and SILENT PARTNER( from "Think Of A Number")  And many of course, that fell short.  The worst(IMO) book-to film adaptation was SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION (aka: "Never Give An Inch")  from KEN KESEY's towering novel.  I was disappointed the Kesey didn't sue the producer.  Those who gave the movie any praise obviously never read the novel.

Sepiatone

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On 6/13/2020 at 5:10 PM, chaya bat woof woof said:

I've read all of Dickens' novels and think Great Expectations and David Copperfield were both very good.

Which versions?  The 1946 GREAT EXPECTATIONS (directed by DAVID LEAN) is one of the best films made. 

THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (1994) is far superior to STEPHEN KING's novella (Rita Hayworth And The Shawshank Redemption).  

LILLIAN HELLMAN's play THE CHILDREN'S HOUR was first adapted in 1936 as THESE THREE, completely washing out the point; it was later adapted more faithfully in 1961 with the title and much content intact (it's the superior adaptation). 

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What I find surprising is your assessment of the movie THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION being better than the Stephen King book from which it was based.  I've never read King's book, so I'll take your word.  The "surprise" for me in this comes from experiencing any of King's books I've read that got film adaptations, the films fell FAR short of the book's quality. The most notable(IMHO) are CARRIE('76) and THE SHINING('80) with THE DEAD ZONE(83) close on their heels.

Sepiatone

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I believe Stephen King hated The Shining with Nicholson.  I don't read Stephen King but saw a TV Version of It years ago (with Tim Curry).  It scared me.  Saw the original Carrie - Piper Laurie (Rosalie Jacobs) was scary as was the scene in the shower where they throw tampons at Carrie.

Yes, I meant the David Lean version of Great Expectations.

I've seen both versions of the The Children's Hour (with Miriam Hopkins from the original).  I think Shirley M. complained the film didn't go far enough.  The line Shirley says about the lie with the ounce of truth resonates with me (because of something that was said not related to homosexuality).  I'm big fans of Audrey H. and James G. but the film is a little too depressing for me right now.

I've never read The Natural (think I read The Fixer) and I lived in NYC when it was filmed in Buffalo (live in a suburb now).  I love how the movie shows the mythos of baseball.

Speaking of Redford, I recently watched The Horse Whisperer.  If you read the book and know what happens to the Robert Redford character, you know it has been changed.

Much as I love Sophie's Choice, the book is somewhat different and you get to know more of Stingo's story.

 

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20 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

What I find surprising is your assessment of the movie THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION being better than the Stephen King book from which it was based.  I've never read King's book, so I'll take your word.  The "surprise" for me in this comes from experiencing any of King's books I've read that got film adaptations, the films fell FAR short of the book's quality. The most notable(IMHO) are CARRIE('76) and THE SHINING('80) with THE DEAD ZONE(83) close on their heels.

Sepiatone

I read Rita Hayworth And The Shawshank Redemption once before the movie and once after I was familiar with it.  The film adds a lot of exposition that is not in the novella, including improvements and characters.  It's one of four novellas in KING's book Different Seasons

I liked CARRIE when I saw it; it's KING's first book published.  I never read it, though I read them all after that up through THE TOMMYKNOCKERS... I do think THE DEAD ZONE might have been KING's best book I've read.  Though THE SHINING book is different than the movie, I like them both. 

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35 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

What I find surprising is your assessment of the movie THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION being better than the Stephen King book from which it was based.  I've never read King's book, so I'll take your word.  The "surprise" for me in this comes from experiencing any of King's books I've read that got film adaptations, the films fell FAR short of the book's quality. The most notable(IMHO) are CARRIE('76) and THE SHINING('80) with THE DEAD ZONE(83) close on their heels.

Sepiatone

I'm surprised that you included THE DEAD ZONE in there. Most people I've talked to consider it one of the better films adapted from King's novels. While I won't dispute the book was better, the movie still has lots going for it, including the superb performances of Christopher Walken (very sympathetic as Johnny Smith) and Martin Sheen (totally believable as a charismatic psycho running for office). 

No secret Kubrick took lots of liberties with King's THE SHINING, but regardless of whether you love it or hate it, it is considered a classic by many (including me and I loved the book).

The 1976 CARRIE is also held in high regard by lots of folks.

I liked Stephen King's short story, but I too am one of those who prefer movie adaptation THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION far better than the story it's based on. It improved on certain plot elements for one thing. For instance:

(SPOILER ALERT):

Warden Norton bribes Tommy with a transfer to a better prison with lots more privileges in print. On screen, it was a much more believable scenario for Norton to have him killed,  no way would Norton would want to risk Tommy EVER going to the authorities with what he found out about the real killer of Andy's wife and her lover, no matter what Norton promised Tommy in return for keeping his mouth shut for the moment.

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Yeah, well....we all have our own takes.  And too....

I do like the movie THE GREEN MILE, so I'm a bit apprehensive about searching out the book and reading it.  Wonder how the movie fared in comparison?  ;) 

What really killed it for me as far as the other three....

The kid with the wiggling finger "puppet" thing and idiotic growling voice.  And Nicholson's way over the top characterization in THE SHINING

Much of the odd incidents of telekinesis and the Mom's behavior that would explain the girl's behavior in CARRIE were left out...

As was the backstory of Martin Sheen's character showing how HE got to what he was in THE DEAD ZONE  and other scenes of telepathic images not shown.

Sepiatone

 

 

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

Much of the odd incidents of telekinesis and the Mom's behavior that would explain the girl's behavior in CARRIE were left out...

I didn't read the book, but there are incidents of Telekinesis in the movie, and PIPER LAURIE as Carrie's mother is scary. 

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On 6/14/2020 at 11:57 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

I believe on TCM, Dave K. said that the Leslie Howard character isn't killed.

If Dave K. said that he was mistaken.    The Howard character clearly dies after being shot by the Bogie character.    This helps set the Davis character 'free' to go to France,  see her mom,, and chase her dreams.

 

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I thought he said that they didn't use that scene.  The Big Sleep is the Bogie/Bacall movie that also has multiple endings.

As for The Green Mile, can't watch most death row films (earlier ones such as Angels with Dirty Faces or A Place in the Sun (Dreiser's book is better than movie but movie is still pretty good)  where you are spared some of the last horrific moments).

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

If Dave K. said that he was mistaken.    The Howard character clearly dies after being shot by the Bogie character.    This helps set the Davis character 'free' to go to France,  see her mom,, and chase her dreams.

...And even though Grandpa won't give up any of his carefully guarded fortune (LESLIE HOWARD rebukes Grandpa for that, and then BOGIE rebukes LESLIE) we know that LESLIE endorses an insurance policy to BETTE and later, when shot, the "dying dreamer" is told by doomed BOGIE : "I'll be seein' you soon..."   there is no other read to that.  

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2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I thought he said that they didn't use that scene.  The Big Sleep is the Bogie/Bacall movie that also has multiple endings.

As for The Green Mile, can't watch most death row films (earlier ones such as Angels with Dirty Faces or A Place in the Sun (Dreiser's book is better than movie but movie is still pretty good)  where you are spared some of the last horrific moments).

There is no doubt how the released 1936 version of The Petrified Forest ends.     As for The Big Sleep;    There were two very different versions.   The first one was only released to US military personael.     Warner decided to hold the film until after the war was over.      When Bogie and Bacall got married Hawks was asked to make changes that focused on the romance of the two in the film (in the book Marlowe is sleeping with Eddie Mars' wife and NOT Vivian,  the rich sister).        Scenes were added (like the one near the end where horse racing is mentioned),   others deleted and some just re-shot  (e.g.  the one with Eddie Mars' wife,,,,,     different actress was used,,,,   and the scene redone to show more caring of Marlowe by Vivian).    The actual ending is the same.

 

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17 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

 

As for The Green Mile, can't watch most death row films (earlier ones such as Angels with Dirty Faces or A Place in the Sun (Dreiser's book is better than movie but movie is still pretty good)  where you are spared some of the last horrific moments).

So, I'm guessing a fine film like IN COLD BLOOD is also out of the question?  And it too, is a good example of faithful adaptation of book to film.  

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

So, I'm guessing a fine film like IN COLD BLOOD is also out of the question?  And it too, is a good example of faithful adaptation of book to film.  

Sepiatone

I can relate in the sense that I won't re-watch  films that contain the subject of rape.  Even a great film like TWO WOMEN I have only looked at once (the exception being the first hour or so of that film - it's gorgeous). 

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I also watched the hanging scene in Changeling as well as the one in The Ox Bow Incident (1942?).  I'm not sure whether there is a lynching scene in To Kill a Mockingbird, but it is fairly evident about what happens to Brock Peters.  Also watched the horrific ending (prison scene) in the picture where Lloyd Bridges is the male version of the femme fatale.

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On 6/16/2020 at 9:03 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

Saw the movie years ago and it is ironic that Robert Blake was later accused of killing his girlfriend (don't remember the verdict).

He was acquitted.  The prosecution relied on the slimy lowlifes he associated with, that he called friends.  Evidently they were too slimy and lowlife for the jury to convict.  Sheesh!

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17 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I also watched the hanging scene in Changeling as well as the one in The Ox Bow Incident (1942?).  I'm not sure whether there is a lynching scene in To Kill a Mockingbird, but it is fairly evident about what happens to Brock Peters.  Also watched the horrific ending (prison scene) in the picture where Lloyd Bridges is the male version of the femme fatale.

No lynching scene in TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD, either in film or book.  And Tom Robinson( Brock Peters' character) was shot trying to escape. Now, there's the scene in which the "menfolk" drive to the jail that tom Robinson is being kept before his trial, and guarded, in a way, by Atticus Finch which was an attempted lynching,  but as you remember, was dispersed by Scout, Jem and Dill when they show up.

Now, I don't get any of that.  I mean, we all KNOW that hangings in movies are fake, and even the occasions that led to the hangings(and of people that are fictional,) are also fictional.  We all know there WASN'T any Ox Bow lynching(for real) OR that Robert Black was really hanged, just as BUD CORT really didn't hang himself in HAROLD AND MAUDE('71) .  So, what's WITH all the squeamish "Oh!  I CAN'T WATCH!".....  😢  attitude here?  They're just movies, right?  

Sepiatone

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I couldn't remember what happened in To Kill a Mockingbird (and I recently re-read it).  The book is more frightening than the movie, especially in the Halloween scene.  I do remember the attempted lynching scene.  Actually, Changeling was based on a real case (I think).  Harold and Maude is a weird film.

Sometimes, even though I know things are fake, they still frighten me.  There was an old, cheesy horror film where someone's head is cut off while using one of the chair lifts up and down the stairs.  I think the name was Homicidal.  This was when my sister was having a sleepover party eons ago.

Now another instance I was thinking of was Agatha Christie.  I enjoyed Margaret Rutheford's (sp?) version of Miss Marple as well as some of the PBS versions.  I liked David Suchet's portrayal of Hercule Perot but I thought Albert Finney was unrecognizable in Murder on the Orient Express (or Calais Coach).  The supporting cast was a who's who of Hollywood, including Richard Widmark as the victim.  Kenneth Branaugh's version was dreadful (but he tends to be an egotist - some of his movie adaptations or Shakespeare were good, others weren't, same with other movies in which he served as director).  I like Michelle Pfeiffer but she isn't Lauren Bacall.  As for Christie's And Then There Were None or Ten Little Indians, the version with Walter Huston and Barry Fitzgerald is the best one I've seen.

Two more adaptations of a movie/play/short story:  Witness for the Prosecution was "fleshed out" to accommodate the stars.  For example, the scene where Tyrone Power is watching himself as Jesse James in the movie theatre.  I still like the movie (and PBS's version with Kim Catrell (sp?) was awful.

The second one is Rebecca.  I read the book and love the 1939 (I think) movie.  However, I can't remember whether I was more astounded in the movie or the book when I discovered how Maxim De Winter (sp?) actually felt about the title character.

 

Excuse typos.

 

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