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Statues of Junipero Serra, Ulysses S. Grant toppled at Golden Gate Park

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Statues of Junipero Serra, Ulysses S. Grant toppled at Golden Gate Park

Protesters in Golden Gate Park toppled statues of Fr. Junipero Serra, Francis Scott Key and President Ulysses S. Grant on Friday night, spurring a national debate over the complex legacies of those historical figures amid a broader movement to remove what critics say are monuments to white supremacy.

A group of roughly 100 people pulled down the monuments displayed in the park’s Music Concourse near the de Young Museum and California Academy of Sciences, an eyewitness said. Police were called to the area just after 8 p.m., and said people in the group threw objects at the officers. The crowd dispersed around 9:30 with no arrests or reports of injuries.

One video posted to Twitter showed the group using a strap to topple the statue of Serra. Photos also showed people vandalized a monument to Spanish writer Miguel Cervantes, the author of “Don Quixote.” And parks officials said the group vandalized several other features in the Music Concourse as well, including sculptures, benches and a fountain.

The toppled statues were removed by park crews late Friday night and are now being kept in storage, a San Francisco Recreation and Park Department spokesperson said.

By Saturday morning, city workers were busy power-washing the statues’ granite pedestals, with some still showing anti-police messages. The base for Serra’s statue identified it as Ohlone land. Just a few drops of paint remained on a statue depicting the fictional characters Don Quixote and his sidekick Sancho Panza looking up to the bust of Cervantes.

    Activists just toppled the Junipero Serra statue in Golden Gate Park here in San Francisco

Serra is known as the founder and leader of the mission system that helped create modern California. Key wrote “The Star-Spangled Banner” and Grant led the Union Army to victory in the Civil War before becoming president.

But the subjugation of Black slaves, in Key’s case; of Native Americans, in Serra’s; and Grant’s seesaw history with both, is another piece of each man’s legacy pointing to why they were targeted Friday night.

In a statement Saturday, San Francisco Mayor London Breed said she understood the “very real pain in this country rooted in our history of slavery and oppression.” But Breed did not weigh in on the debate over memorializing Serra, Key and Grant, focusing instead on the broader destruction at the park.

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It's apparent that these democrats have no knowledge of history and are just picking any statue regardless of who the person is. Once they let them get away with rioting, now they think they can do anything.

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Junipero Serra is an extremely controversial figure in California and American history.

His statues have been defaced in a number of locations and he has been discussed for decades by Native American historians-- some of whom opposed his canonization by Pope John Paul II.

He has his Advocates and he has his critics.

But Democrats, or Juneteenth revelers are hardly the first Americans to protest or take a critical look at his treatment of Native Americans in the Catholic mission system.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

Junipero Serra is an extremely controversial figure in California and American history.

His statues have been defaced in a number of locations and he has been discussed for decades by Native American historians-- some of whom opposed his canonization by Pope John Paul II.

He has his Advocates and he has his critics.

But Democrats, or Juneteenth revelers are hardly the first Americans to protest or take a critical look at his treatment of Native Americans in the Catholic mission system.

 

 

HS! the democrats and the left are trying to pass off street rioters as decent America-loving protesters.

 

"well, they never were that and you can't make them that." -jimmy stewart, ROPE

:)

Rope (1948)

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2 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

HS! the democrats and the left are trying to pass off street rioters as decent America-loving protesters.

 

"well, they never were that and you can't make them that." -jimmy stewart, ROPE

:)

 

And the guys at the Boston Tea Party were just ordinary protesters fighting for self-determination, and in the meantime destroying other people's property to get it.

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Those pulling down Grant's statue should had watched the mini series about him.  How would the Civil War ended if he wasn't involved?

EXXB2NQU8AEvMIi.jpg

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Well Nip, add that to the list, I get a chuckle the Confederacy couldn't make their frigged mind up what type of flag they wanted. :blink::lol:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flags_of_the_Confederate_States_of_America

 

LOL at the comparison of these 2.

The "Sibley Flag", Battle Flag of the Army of New Mexico, commanded by General Henry Hopkins Sibley.

SibleyFlag.png

 

Vietnam (communist)

2000px-Flag_of_Vietnam.svg.png

 

Wish i was in Hanoi, hooray, hooray... ♫

vietnamese-soldiers.jpg

:P

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Matt Bateman
 
@mbateman
· Jun 21
Found the full eulogizing of Grant by Frederick Douglass that I’ve seen excerpted.
His praise is damning for the desecrators of Grant’s statue.
 
Douglass fought villainy *and* honored heroism. He saw the latter as critical for emancipation. Where lives that sentiment today?
 
EbCwD61XsAUztsI?format=jpg&name=small

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, mr6666 said:
 
 
Matt Bateman
 
@mbateman
· Jun 21
Found the full eulogizing of Grant by Frederick Douglass that I’ve seen excerpted.
His praise is damning for the desecrators of Grant’s statue.
 
Douglass fought villainy *and* honored heroism. He saw the latter as critical for emancipation. Where lives that sentiment today?
 
EbCwD61XsAUztsI?format=jpg&name=small

 

That was mentioned in the "Grant" mini series along with freeing William Jones.

On March 29, 1859, Ulysses S. Grant went to the St. Louis Courthouse to attend to a pressing legal matter. That day Grant signed a manumission paper freeing William Jones, an enslaved African American man that he had previously acquired from his father-in-law, “Colonel” Frederick F. Dent.

William-Jones-Manumission.jpg?resize=768

Edited by hamradio
Typo

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This is the natural consequence of a policy where all Confederate “Heroes” are protected as part of our glorious legacy, the Slave State!  People justly demand they not be honored in public spaces, military bases, etc. any longer.  It would not be too hard to have statues moved to museums, as curios to a bygone time.  However, the racists led byTrump, etc. double down, and the justifiable rage over institutionalized racism is vented on the statues.  So anger over this spills out to Serra, Grant, etc, some more deserving of this anger than others.  So Trump is hustled off to his bunker to protect his orange face and yellow aaasss!

 

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