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jakeem

Dame Olivia turns 104 -- a tribute

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 ...Dame Olivia de Havilland (born in Tokyo, Japan on July 1, 1916), the living Hollywood legend who celebrates her 104th birthday today. She has resided in Paris since the 1950s.
 
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She has been nominated for five Academy Awards. Her recognized roles and movies are as follows (Oscar wins in bold): 
  • Melanie Hamilton Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind" (1939). Best Supporting Actress.
  • Emmy Brown in "Hold Back the Dawn" (1941). Best Actress.
  • Miss Josephine 'Jody' Norris in "To Each His Own" (1945). Best Actress.
  • Virginia Stuart Cunningham in "The Snake Pit" (1947). Best Actress.
  • Catherine Sloper in "The Heiress" (1948). Best Actress.
 
Her younger sister -- by 15 months -- was Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland (1917-2013), who became an actress under the name Joan Fontaine‍. Their rivalry began when they were young girls. As Fontaine declared in 1978: "I married first, won the Oscar before Olivia did, and if I die first, she'll undoubtedly be livid because I beat her to it!"
 
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De Havilland was signed by Warner Bros. to star in the production of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Directed by Max Reinhardt, the movie's cast also included James Cagney, Dick Powell, Joe E. Brown, Frank McHugh, Arthur Treacher, Victor Jory, Anita Louise, Billy Barty and Mickey Rooney as Puck. De Havilland, who played Hermia, was more than familiar with the character. She had played the role in Reinhardt's stage version at the Hollywood Bowl.
 
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Between 1935 and 1941, De Havilland appeared in eight films with actor Errol Flynn, known for his roles as swashbuckling heroes. One of their best pairings was in the 1938 Technicolor action-adventure film "The Adventures of Robin Hood," which was directed by Michael Curtiz and William Keighley. He played Robin of Locksley, who became the outlaw Robin Hood. She played Maid Marian, a ward of the king, The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won three Oscars: Best Art Direction (Carl Jules Weyl), Best Film Editing (Ralph Dawson) and Best Music, Original Score (Erich Wolfgang Korngold). By the way, De Havilland's horse in the film was a golden palomino stallion named Golden Cloud. The steed eventually was purchased for $2,500 by Western star Roy Rogers and renamed Trigger. 
 
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Directed by Curtiz, the 1939 historically based film "The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex' starred Bette Davis as Britain's Queen Elizabeth I and Flynn as the heroic Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex. De Havilland (pictured below with Nanette Fabray) co-starred as Penelope Gray, a royal lady-in-waiting. Based on Maxwell Anderson’s 1930 play "Elizabeth the Queen," the film focused on the tempestuous relationship between Elizabeth and Essex.
 
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De Havilland received her first Academy Award nomination -- recognition in the Best Supporting Actress category -- for her performance as Melanie Hamilton Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind." But the award went to her co-star Hattie McDaniel, who became the first African-American performer to win an Oscar. David O. Selznick's 1939 film version of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Margaret Mitchell won seven other Academy Awards: Best Picture; Best Director (Victor Fleming); Best Actress (Vivian Leigh); Best Writing, Screenplay (a posthumous award to Sidney Howard); Best Cinematography (Ernest Haller and Ray Rennahan); Best Film Editing (Hal C. Kern and James E. Newcom); and Best Art Direction (Lyle Wheeler). De Havilland is the last surviving major cast member of the epic film.
 
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David Niven and De Havilland co-starred for the second time in the 1939 crime comedy "Raffles," based on the British author E.W. Hornung's tales about the gentleman thief A.J. Raffles. Their first picture together was the 1936 version of "The Charge of the Light Brigade."  Directed by Sam Wood, "Raffles" starred Niven as the title character and De Havilland as his love interest Gwen Manders. There had been several films about Raffles before this one. John Barrymore played the character in a 1917 silent film that also served as an early screen appearance by Frank Morgan. In 1930, Ronald Colman starred in a 1930 sound version opposite Kay Francis.
 
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De Havilland received the second of her five Academy Award nominations for her performance in "Hold Back the Dawn" (1941). She starred as an American woman who met and married a Romanian national (Charles Boyer) in a Mexican border town. Her new husband was only interested in obtaining a green card and access to America. But he gradually fell in love with her. Directed by Mitchell Leisen ("Midnight," "To Each His Own"), the movie was based on the 1941 novel by Ketti Frings. In addition to De Havilland's Best Actress nomination, the film earned five other Oscar nods: Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay (Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder), Best Black-and-White Art Direction-Interior Decoration (Hans Dreier, Robert Usher and Sam Comer), Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Leo Tover) and Best Music, Scoring of a Dramatic Picture (Victor Young). De Havilland was nominated in the same category with her sister, who won the Oscar for her performance in Sir Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion."
 
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De Havilland and Davis became lifelong friends during the filming of the 1942 drama "In This Our Life," their third picture together. Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Ellen Glasgow, the film was directed by John Huston and Raoul Walsh. The actresses played sisters whose personal relationship was strained by their romantic rivalry. They would appear together in three more films, including "Hush, Hush, Sweet Charlotte" (1964).
 
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Disappointed by some of the roles she was being offered by Warner Bros., De Havilland began refusing projects. As a result, the studio suspended her three times in five years. Warner Bros. also extended her contract to compensate for the suspensions. De Havilland then sued the studio for unfair labor practices -- and won a court case in 1944. "The De Havilland Law"  helped lead to the end of Hollywood's "studio system," which gave the film companies control over the careers of actors.
 
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De Havilland won the 1946 Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the drama "To Each His Own." She played a young woman whose World War I-era romance with a pilot (John Lund, pictured below) led to a pregnancy. After her plan to adopt her son was foiled, she wound up being reunited with him years later during World War II. Directed by Leisen, the film also featured Lund as the grown son of De Havilland's character.
 
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After De Havilland collected her Oscar at the 19th Academy Awards ceremony on March 13, 1947, she rebuffed Fontaine's attempt to congratulate her. "I don't know why she does that when she knows how I feel," De Havilland reportedly told her press agent. The sisters were said to have had a strained relationship ever since they were children. 
 
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In the 1946 thriller "The Dark Mirror," De Havilland played identical twin sisters who became suspects in a murder investigation. Unable to determine which of the sisters was guilty of homicide, a detective (Thomas Mitchell) teamed with a psychiatrist (Lew Ayres) in an attempt to solve the case. Directed by Robert Siodmak ("The Killers"), the film also starred Richard Long in one of his early screen roles.
 
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De Havilland received her fourth Academy Award nomination for her starring role in "The Snake Pit" (1947), a drama directed by Anatole Litvak. She played a married woman institutionalized at a state hospital after she began losing her grip on reality. Leo Genn co-starred as the dedicated physician who tried to bring her back from the abyss.
 
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For her performance in the 1949 drama "The Heiress," De Havilland became the third person -- after Luise Rainer and Davis -- to win a second Academy Award as Best Actress. In the film, directed by William Wyler, she played a wealthy 19th-century woman pursued by a man (Montgomery Clift) possibly lured by her money and lifestyle. Ruth and Augustus Goetz adapted the screenplay from their 1947 stage play, based on the Henry James story "Washington Square." The film also won Oscars for Best Black-and-White Art Direction/Set Decoration (John Meehan, Harry Horner and Emile Kuri), Best Black-and-White Costume Design (Edith Head, Gile Steele) and Best Original Music Score (Aaron Copland).
 
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In the 1956 romantic comedy "The Ambassador's Daughter," De Havilland (pictured below with Myrna Loy) starred as Joan Fiske -- whose father (played by Edward Arnold) was the United States' minister to France. When a U.S. senator (Adolphe Menjou) arrived in Paris, he attempted to have "The City of Light" declared off-limits to American enlisted men. In response, Joan, who opposed the move, decided to prove that American soldiers were capable of behaving themselves. She even accepted a date with Sgt. Danny Sullivan (John Forsythe), who turned out to be a gentleman. This caused complications for Joan, who became attracted to Sullivan despite her engagement to Prince Nicholas Obelski (Francis Lederer). The film was written, produced and directed by Norman Krasna ("Princess O'Rourke," "The Big Hangover").
 
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De Havilland co-starred with Alan Ladd in the 1958 drama "The Proud Rebel," a post-Civil War tale directed by Curtiz. Ladd played a former Confederate soldier (Ladd) who moved to Illinois with his 10-year-old son. The boy (played by Ladd's real-life son David) stopped speaking after he witnessed the tragic death of his mother. As a result, his father hoped to find help for him in the North. It was David Ladd's second film with his father. They first appeared together in "The Big Land" (1957). 
 
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Directed by Amthony Asquith ("The V.I.P.s," "The Yellow Rolls-Royce"), the British drama "Libel" starred Dirk Bogarde as Sir Mark Loddon -- a prominent nobleman and World War II veteran accused of being an impostor. With the support of his wife -- played by De Havilland -- he decided to sue for libel. Based on a 1930s British play by Edward Wooll, the movie's screenplay was adapted by co-producer Anatole de Grunwald and Karl Tunberg. A 1959 Academy Award nomination went to Tunberg, but it was for his screenplay adaptation of the year's biggest movie, "Ben-Hur." He was the only nominee who didn't win an Oscar for the epic production, which received a record 11 awards. 
 
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The poignant 1962 drama "Light in the Piazza" starred Yvette Mimieux as Clara Johnson, a mentally challenged young woman traveling through Italy with her mother Meg (played by De Havilland). In Florence, Clara attracted the attention of Fabrizio Naccarelli (George Hamilton), a member of a wealthy Italian family. When a romance developed between Clara and Fabrizio, Mrs. Johnson became hopeful that marriage might keep Clara from being institutionalized. As a result, she decided not to mention Clara's disability. Directed by Guy Green ("A Patch of Blue"), the film also starred Rossano Brazzi and Barry Sullivan. 
 
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De Havilland made her final appearance in a feature-length picture in "The 5th Musketeer," a 1979 swashbuckling film set in 17th century France and based on Alexandre Dumas the Elder's tale about the legendary "Man in the Iron Mask." Beau Bridges had the dual roles of King Louis XIV and Philippe of Gascony, Louis' little-known twin brother. De Havilland appeared as their mother. Although this was her last film, the actress continued to take occasional television roles. 
 
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At the 75th annual Academy Awards ceremony held on March 23, 2003, De Havilland presided over a reunion of Oscar-winning performers from years past.

On December 15, 2013, Fontaine died at the age of 96. There had been reports that the Oscar-winning sisters had stopped speaking to each other in 1975. But De Havilland issued a statement declaring she was "shocked and saddened" by Fontaine's death. 

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In June 2017 -- two weeks before her 101st birthday -- De Havilland, was appointed by Queen Elizabeth II a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire for services to drama. The actress, who was born a British citizen, became the oldest woman so honored. 
 
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My favorite films with Olivia are The Heiress, My Cousin Rachel, The Adventures of Robinhood and GWTW.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY OLIVIA!

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God bless this woman. She's one of my favorite actresses. I will truly be heartbroken when she passes away. I feel that she is the last of her kind, an actress from a bygone age, and our only remaining link to the Hollywood that we all know and love, and wish would return.

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Thanks for some small insights into her relationship with Fontaine. Other than everyone always saying the two sisters were rivals, this is by far the most info I've ever read anywhere about how they felt about one another. I also liked very much seeing some photos of the two of them together.

No mention at all of her personal life otherwise, however. Typically, I don't care too much about these things, but I can't help but wonder if she ever married and/or had children or if she's a lesbian. Not my business if she doesn't want to share such things

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Happy Birthday Olivia! Loved you in all your films with Errol Flynn, you were terrific as sweet Melanie in GONE WITH THE WIND, you made an awesome villain in HUSH...HUSH, SWEET CHARLOTTE, you were heartbreaking in THE SNAKE PIT, and more than deserved your Oscars in TO EACH HIS OWN and THE HEIRESS.

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Happy Birthday Olivia! My favorite Olivia role is as Angela Guisseppi/Mlle. Georges in Anthony Adverse (1936), a film in which the 19-year-old Olivia goes from Italian servant girl to Europe's greatest opera singer and Napoleon's mistress. Gale Sondergaard sums up Olivia's progress when, in the opera audience at the end of the film, Gale refers to Olivia, commenting to Claude Rains, "That girl used to wash my clothes."

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Happy Birthday Olivia! She has been one of my very favorite actresses since I was a kid. I always wanted to look like her. I even used a publicity photo of her to try to recreate her look for my high school senior photo ( fruitless attempt, as no one could recreate her beauty.)

Truly a legendary lady and actress. I think TO EACH HIS OWN is my favorite film of hers.

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ABSOLUTELY SUPERB WORK!

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From October 5, 2006... at the rambunctious age of ninety

 

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Happy Birthday Olivia. 

I love her and she's a favorite. I love her in all the films mentioned so far. The Heiress,  Anthony Adverse, Light in the Piazza, To Each His Own, GWTW, The Snake Pit, The Adventures of Robin Hood, In This Our Life the list goes on. Great performance in all these films and love them all and never tire of seeing all of them. Olivia is amazing and hope she's around for more years. A Truly Great actress.

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Olivia is one of the main reasons I really got into 'those old movies' (quotes from my 20 year old buddies who wondered if I turned gay or something,,, since NO one in our circle were into this,,,).

It came after watching The Strawberry Blonde.     I was engaged to a gal more like the blonde in the film.     I found I really like "that Olivia gal" more!    I got in the car and drove to Edmunds Hollywood Bookshop and purchased The Films of Olivia DeHavilland,  many photos and some other stuff. 

I ended up pushing-back on my fiance and I broke off the wedding two weeks before the date.       It took me 3 years to find a gal like Olivia in that film.    It will be 25 years of a happy marriage this September.

I also started to store a fine red wine to age for the sad day Olivia would pass.  Hey,  she was in her late 70s,,,.   Well I had to replace bottles after 5 - 7 years.   I stopped this folly when Olivia turned 90!

Silk and steel: the life of Olivia de Havilland | Sight & Sound | BFI

 

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I sent a fan letter to Olivia de Havilland at her Paris address in 1990. I heard nothing in response at the time, thinking, "Oh, well, I tried."

Then, much to my surprise, I received a response from the lady in 1995. I could hardly believe it when I saw a thick envelope arrive in the mail with her return address in the corner of it.  She sent me a note of apology for the time delay, and thanked me for my letter she called "perceptive," along with all five photos I had sent her autographed.

A very gracious response from one of the legends of Hollywood for which the wait (a little lengthier than expected) was well worth it. I'm glad that I was able to make a brief connection with an actress who has appeared in a larger number of favourite films of mine than most.

Never would I have imagined, though, that after all these years she would still with is. For which I am very grateful.

lxy6WH8.jpg

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Always a pleasure to watch, HAPPY BIRTHDAY our living legend! 

I enjoy her pairings with one of my favorites (ERROL FLYNN).  I just saw her (again) in HUSH HUSH SWEET CHARLOTTE.  Damn!  She is a fine actress! 

 

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I loved both the sisters in the movies and I was disappointed and sorry that they never could see through their personal animosities to be in a film together.

Alfred Hitchcock's favorite movie fantasy was to hire one of the sisters for a film role.

Then while the cameras were ready to roll, have the other sister walk on as a surprise cameo!

Two beautiful actresses with so many memorable roles, but my favorites were:

"Rebecca" for Joan with Laurence Olivier, directed by Hitchcock &

"The Heiress" for Olivia with Montgomery Clift, directed by William Wyler.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

"The Heiress" for Olivia with Montgomery Clift, directed by William Wyler.

THE HEIRESS is superb. 

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Olivia is one of the main reasons I really got into 'those old movies' (quotes from my 20 year old buddies who wondered if I turned gay or something,,, since NO one in our circle were into this,,,).

It came after watching The Strawberry Blonde.     I was engaged to a gal more like the blonde in the film.     I found I really like "that Olivia gal" more!    I got in the car and drove to Edmunds Hollywood Bookshop and purchased The Films of Olivia DeHavilland,  many photos and some other stuff. 

I ended up pushing-back on my fiance and I broke off the wedding two weeks before the date.       It took me 3 years to find a gal like Olivia in that film.    It will be 25 years of a happy marriage this September.

I also started to store a fine red wine to age for the sad day Olivia would pass.  Hey,  she was in her late 70s,,,.   Well I had to replace bottles after 5 - 7 years.   I stopped this folly when Olivia turned 90!

Silk and steel: the life of Olivia de Havilland | Sight & Sound | BFI

 

My father always had a crush on Olivia, and always favored the "Amy" type for Stawberry Blonde, as attested to by his 50+ years marriage to my mother.  The way Olivia says, "'Zactly!" in that film won his heart.   He also always loved brown-eyed girls.  I remember when a young woman from the local environmental department who came to survey cleanup of a gas leak on their property, and he said, "She looked so cute with the dirt smudged on her cheeks and those big brown eyes, just like Olivia!"  Unfortunately, Dad passed in 2012 at age 86, so she has outlived him, which I never would have believed. 

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5 hours ago, rosebette said:

My father always had a crush on Olivia, and always favored the "Amy" type for Stawberry Blonde, as attested to by his 50+ years marriage to my mother.  The way Olivia says, "'Zactly!" in that film won his heart.   He also always loved brown-eyed girls.  I remember when a young woman from the local environmental department who came to survey cleanup of a gas leak on their property, and he said, "She looked so cute with the dirt smudged on her cheeks and those big brown eyes, just like Olivia!"  Unfortunately, Dad passed in 2012 at age 86, so she has outlived him, which I never would have believed. 

My dad has had a crush on Olivia for many years. She's in his very small list of 10s. I can see why. She has aged beautifully. What a lucky woman to have worked with so many great actors. And what woman wouldn't want to be kissed by Errol? 💗

My parents have been married for 33 years. Knowing my mom, I can say my dad likes petite women, just like Olivia. Last time we watched Robin Hood together his face would almost be glowing when Olivia came on the screen.

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Not a good selection of films today. Typical.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

Not a good selection of films today. Typical.

Did you mean the De Havilland films shown on her birthday?

It is a rather odd \ weak line-up but it does include films that are not as well known as her 'hit parade" or Oscar nominated performances:   Robin Hood,  GWTW,  The Heiress,   TO Each His Own, etc..

If TCM has shown those films how many would be complaining with "these films again!".

 

 

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Just make sure no one tells her about GWTW and HBO. 

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3 hours ago, Sukhov said:

Just make sure no one tells her about GWTW and HBO. 

Yea,  she might just sue like she did with that misguided lawsuit related to mini-series Feud.

 

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Would be fitting if someone made her a birthday cake that looked like THIS guy  ;) -----------------

Yeah.  Happy birthday, Olivia.

Sepiatone

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23 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Did you mean the De Havilland films shown on her birthday?

It is a rather odd \ weak line-up but it does include films that are not as well known as her 'hit parade" or Oscar nominated performances:   Robin Hood,  GWTW,  The Heiress,   TO Each His Own, etc..

If TCM has shown those films how many would be complaining with "these films again!".

 

 

Yes, I meant Olivia day. Most of her noteworthy performances were missing.

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On 7/1/2020 at 1:09 AM, sewhite2000 said:

Thanks for some small insights into her relationship with Fontaine. Other than everyone always saying the two sisters were rivals, this is by far the most info I've ever read anywhere about how they felt about one another. I also liked very much seeing some photos of the two of them together.

No mention at all of her personal life otherwise, however. Typically, I don't care too much about these things, but I can't help but wonder if she ever married and/or had children or if she's a lesbian. Not my business if she doesn't want to share such things

Olivia was married twice and had two children. Her son, Benjamin Goodrich, died in 1991 at age 42. Her daughter, Gisèle Galante (born in 1956) is still living and the two are very close.

Joan was married & divorced 4 times and had 1 adopted daughter. The two were estranged.

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