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SunAndMoon

"Guilty pleasure" movies

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1 minute ago, Peebs said:

I love Trouble with Angels.  I'd also add The World of Henry Orient (1964).

I put the World of Henry Orient in a different category. I seriously LOVE that film, it's on my 10 favorite film lists.

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One guilty pleasure is the Sandra Dee/Bobby Darin movie If A Man Answers...

Another is Elizabeth Taylor/Laurence Harvey in Night Watch.

 

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6 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

I put the World of Henry Orient in a different category. I seriously LOVE that film, it's on my 10 favorite film lists.

The color cinematography and set design of The World of Henry Orient are just amazing. I had the strange experience of watching this film on a high definition TV in a bar with the sound turned down. It would be a wonderful film to watch on the big screen.

Guilty pleasures: films that you would never argue are great films or even very good films but that you find compulsively watchable, for whatever reason. Susan Slade, for instance, has a scene in a beautiful house in Monterey, but it also has a gloriously cheesy low-budget moment that I won't spoil for those who haven't seen it; it wants us to believe that Troy Donahue is going to write the Great American Novel; and among many other irresistible moments, early in the film it has Dorothy McGuire wearing a mustard yellow dress that is perhaps the least flattering color she could possibly wear. So many "What were they thinking?" moments!

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My guilty pleasures include:

Butterfield 8

Year of the Dragon with Mickey Rourke

A Prayer for the Dying also with Mickey Rourke

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13 minutes ago, kingrat said:

The color cinematography and set design of The World of Henry Orient are just amazing. I had the strange experience of watching this film on a high definition TV in a bar with the sound turned down. It would be a wonderful film to watch on the big screen.

Guilty pleasures: films that you would never argue are great films or even very good films but that you find compulsively watchable, for whatever reason. Susan Slade, for instance, has a scene in a beautiful house in Monterey, but it also has a gloriously cheesy low-budget moment that I won't spoil for those who haven't seen it; it wants us to believe that Troy Donahue is going to write the Great American Novel; and among many other irresistible moments, early in the film it has Dorothy McGuire wearing a mustard yellow dress that is perhaps the least flattering color she could possibly wear. So many "What were they thinking?" moments!

I hope you've seen Henry Orient since then or before. The music in the film is so pretty. The opening with the school bus on Park or Madison in the autumn with that soundtrack is so beautiful. I wish TCM would show the film, it's been awhile since it was on. I agree, that house in Susan Slade is gorgeous :)

 

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1 hour ago, MissWatusi said:

One guilty pleasure is the Sandra Dee/Bobby Darin movie If A Man Answers...

Another is Elizabeth Taylor/Laurence Harvey in Night Watch.

 

Haven't seen If A Man Answers in years. The film seems to be off the radar for some reason. I like it better than That Funny Feeling, another Dee/Darin film. Come September is a cute film too.

It was funny, Hallmark did a remake of If A Man Answers. I didn't watch it but did see ads for it. It was about training your husband like your puppy according to the ad.

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3 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Haven;t seen If A Man Answers in years. The film seems to be off the radar for some reason.

It's off TCM's radar because they don't want to pay to rent it.

But it's one of NBC/Universal's biggest home video titles. It has been issued more than once on DVD because it has been such a big seller.

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7 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

HEAD w/The Monkees

HEAD was just on TCM I think, but I didn't watch it if it was... I want to though, for VICTOR MATURE !!! 

 

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

The color cinematography and set design of The World of Henry Orient are just amazing. I had the strange experience of watching this film on a high definition TV in a bar with the sound turned down. It would be a wonderful film to watch on the big screen.

Guilty pleasures: films that you would never argue are great films or even very good films but that you find compulsively watchable, for whatever reason. Susan Slade, for instance, has a scene in a beautiful house in Monterey, but it also has a gloriously cheesy low-budget moment that I won't spoil for those who haven't seen it; it wants us to believe that Troy Donahue is going to write the Great American Novel; and among many other irresistible moments, early in the film it has Dorothy McGuire wearing a mustard yellow dress that is perhaps the least flattering color she could possibly wear. So many "What were they thinking?" moments!

I first saw The World of Henry Orient when it was first released, I'm pretty sure it was at the Valentine Theater on Fordham Rd. in the Bronx. I must have been very impressed seeing it on the big screen because it's been a favorite since then. I forget to mention when Val is walking thru Central Park in the snow, all alone, it's late afternoon, for me, one of the most beautifully filmed scenes ever in NYC.

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20 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

I always thought guilty pleasures were those films that were so bad, or in such bad taste, that no one is supposed to like them (like Plan 9... or like many of the John Waters films).   

Mine, probably because one of our local stations always ran it (it must've been especially cheap to show):  Zardoz

Why the costume designer didn't win an Oscar is beyond me 🙂

Zardoz_zed.jpg

 

I quoted the wrong post. I like that one also have the DVD. Zardoz

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14 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

PS:   For T.V. viewing it is the serial Dark Shadows;    I'm watching this on decades and one 'game' my wife and I are playing is which of us can point out the mistakes;  most of them are flubbed reading of their lines,  but sometimes there are also background shadows of crew members! 

If it gets up to The Leviathans episodes there's a  scene in an antique shop where the spring bell on door falls to the floor, pretty funny, everyone acts like nothing happened.

 

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Flubbed lines, collapsing sets, flies buzzing around were part of the norm for DARK SHADOWS.

But I still love that show. The show's many blunders are what make it enduring.

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14 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

HEAD was just on TCM I think, but I didn't watch it if it was... I want to though, for VICTOR MATURE !!! 

 

I have it on VHS.  Somewhere!  I haven't been able to track it down.  Same with my VHS copies of "A Hard Day's Night" and Help!"  And there isn't a DVD reissue of "Head" to be found for love nor money.  

And I don't recall it being scheduled on TCM recently either, unless it was slotted at a time far past to what I look on.    Yeah, VIC was a surprise and delight for me since(as many here know) I was raised by who probably was his A-#1 fan!   Growing up, we knew that making any unnecessary sound and noise while Victor Mature movies were on meant Hell to pay!  :D 

Sepiatone

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46 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I have it on VHS.  Somewhere!  I haven't been able to track it down.  Same with my VHS copies of "A Hard Day's Night" and Help!"  And there isn't a DVD reissue of "Head" to be found for love nor money.  

And I don't recall it being scheduled on TCM recently either, unless it was slotted at a time far past to what I look on.    Yeah, VIC was a surprise and delight for me since(as many here know) I was raised by who probably was his A-#1 fan!   Growing up, we knew that making any unnecessary sound and noise while Victor Mature movies were on meant Hell to pay!  :D 

Sepiatone

I could be mistaken, but I think I'd seen a preview trailer at TCM very recently and yup, there's VICTOR MATURE!!  ABC-TV probably broadcast that "late night" in the 1970s - and I think it bored me! 

I was looking at A HARD DAY'S NIGHT the day before yesterday; that's always a pleasure. 

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Interesting about Victor Mature.  When my mom was at Hunter College, she was the recipient of Mr. Mature's wrath at being described as a "nancy boy" when he showed up at some dance or other (this was in the Hunter College paper).  She did not write the article, but she was the only one present.  He ended up being very nice to her.  He was wearing a ruffled white shirt (or something akin) due to going immediately from a stage play (i.e., still in his costume) to the dance.  I wish TCM would run Kiss of Death during prime time or on noir alley.  Love that Richard Widmark performance/laugh.

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Mature is/was always full of those interesting kind of stories.  One I liked was when he was filming some "Swords-and-Sandals" flick, business partner JIM BACKUS  picked him up to rush to some crisis at one of their business concerns with Vic still in costume.  They stopped for a bite at a roadside diner and the waitress looked hesitantly at Vic and the way he was dressed and Vic, in good humor allegedly asked her, "What's the matter?  Don't you serve men in uniform? " ;) And that he wasn't above self parody(think "After The Fox") or self deprecation, as we all know the tale of his trying to join a certain country club that refused him admission with the explanation "We're sorry, but we prohibit actors from membership."  and Vic protesting......

"I'm not an actor, and I've got 30 pictures under my belt that proves it!"  :D 

Sepiatone

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I'm a fan of of late-career melodramas of actresses "of a certain age" which were sort of reverse-engineered to downplay the inappropriateness of the roles for those particular actresses. A good example is Imitation of Life, in which Lana Turner's character was "five years late" getting started on her acting career. Let's see...Graduate high school at 18..plus five years equals...23?? In Madame X she was a "shop girl" newlywed who appeared to be in roughly the same age group as her new mother-in-law. At the beginning of Back Street Susan Hayward was just getting started in an entry-level job in the fashion industry. Uh huh. I swear it's not snark; I really love these movies and the extra layer of silliness added by the inappropriateness of it all only adds to the appeal. And if it was Ross Hunter giving them gorgeous scenery to chew on, all the better.

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1 hour ago, DougieB said:

I'm a fan of of late-career melodramas of actresses "of a certain age" which were sort of reverse-engineered to downplay the inappropriateness of the roles for those particular actresses. A good example is Imitation of Life, in which Lana Turner's character was "five years late" getting started on her acting career. Let's see...Graduate high school at 18..plus five years equals...23?? In Madame X she was a "shop girl" newlywed who appeared to be in roughly the same age group as her new mother-in-law. At the beginning of Back Street Susan Hayward was just getting started in an entry-level job in the fashion industry. Uh huh. I swear it's not snark; I really love these movies and the extra layer of silliness added by the inappropriateness of it all only adds to the appeal. And if it was Ross Hunter giving them gorgeous scenery to chew on, all the better.

At least in 20th Century Fox's THE BEST OF EVERYTHING (1959) Joan Crawford is already at the top of the corporate ladder, playing a ruthless executive.

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On 7/6/2020 at 10:45 AM, Sepiatone said:

I have it on VHS.  Somewhere!  I haven't been able to track it down.  Same with my VHS copies of "A Hard Day's Night" and Help!"  And there isn't a DVD reissue of "Head" to be found for love nor money.  

Well, not a solo DVD anyway--Didn't it come out as part of Criterion's Bob Rafelson Blu-ray boxset?:  https://www.criterion.com/films/27527-head  (I'm being rhetorical, of course, since I rented the disk at the library.)  And as for Hard Day's Night, well, come now:  https://www.criterion.com/films/28547-a-hard-day-s-night

And I feel guilty for being one of the Monkees fans who doesn't like Head:  It's Bob once more dumping on the fans for being "suckered" by the marketing, the group wanting to get out of their "creation" by joining in on the self-dumping, passive-hostility sketches incoherently scripted by an easy-riding Jack Nicholson, and only one or two memorable songs out of several unmemorable ones.   Basically, if the Monkees complained that they were the "imitation Beatles", this is their imitation Magical Mystery Tour...Oh, and Victor Mature only shows up as a couple of surreal "Hollywood" cameos, that make about as much sense as any of the other would-be Biting Satire.

(I remember seeing it in a college theater "60's TV" cult double-feature with the "Batman" movie, the Monkees were just making their 80's MTV renaissance, and everyone in the theater was clearly pumped to see the second feature.  After 90 minutes of amusing camp tongue-in-cheek, we got our first look at Head, and you could feel the palpable, audience-squirming sensation of "The....HELL?...  😕 " )

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5 hours ago, EricJ said:

And I feel guilty for being one of the Monkees fans who doesn't like Head:  It's Bob once more dumping on the fans for being "suckered" by the marketing, the group wanting to get out of their "creation" by joining in on the self-dumping, passive-hostility sketches incoherently scripted by an easy-riding Jack Nicholson, and only one or two memorable songs out of several unmemorable ones.   Basically, if the Monkees complained that they were the "imitation Beatles", this is their imitation Magical Mystery Tour...Oh, and Victor Mature only shows up as a couple of surreal "Hollywood" cameos, that make about as much sense as any of the other would-be Biting Satire.

 

Don't feel guilty. I was a HUGE Monkees fan as a kid and I didn't like HEAD one bit. Maybe you had to be 'out of it' on substances to be able to appreciate it (much like a lot of folks were stoned when watching 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY) but it was too 'far out' for me to make heads or tails out of it.

Still like their music though, even if it wasn't really them who were performing the songs (at least not on their TV series, not sure about the movie).

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7 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Don't feel guilty. I was a HUGE Monkees fan as a kid and I didn't like HEAD one bit. Maybe you had to be 'out of it' on substances to be able to appreciate it (much like a lot of folks were stoned when watching 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY) but it was too 'far out' for me to make heads or tails out of it.

Still like their music though, even if it wasn't really them who were performing the songs (at least not on their TV series, not sure about the movie).

Head's maybe a movie that hasn't aged all that well, but I saw it in a theater at the time of its release and I liked the good-natured corniness of it, as well as the pleasing "soft core" psychedelic effects which didn't seem nearly as forced or phony as in most other "countercultural" movies of the time, such as the grueling The Trip.  I didn't have a TV but I'd seen enough of the shows to understand that the movie was a gentle poke at the absurdity of what had been purposefully, and somewhat crassly, assembled for a television audience. I'm not feeling the idea that there was hostility involved in assembling the movie, however.  To me it seemed like good (maybe sophomoric) fun and, as far as credibility goes, the appearance of cultural soothsayer Frank Zappa sealed the deal, telling Davey Jones that his music was "awfully white" and that he needed to work on his singing because the youth of America were depending on him to show them the way. Stunt casting? Sure, but what imaginative stunt casting: Sonny Liston, the notorious topless dancer Carol Doda, Annette Funicello and female impersonator T. C. Jones, as well as the aforementioned Victor Mature. I think of the movie as an acknowledgement that there was a larger culture than just pop culture and that even the "Pre-fab Four" could have a role in it. EPIX now has a two-part documentary about the late-60's, early-70's music scene in Laurel Canyon and various members of the Monkees are all over it, freely mingling with the music greats and soon-to-be greats of that era. They were a real part of the cultural zeitgeist, no matter how they got there. I think Head reflects the legitimacy, not just that they themselves wanted, but which was given them by some of their contemporaries who saw something in them and took them under their wing. In other hands it could have been a comfortable commercial project like the Dave Clark Five and Herman's Hermits movies, but they opted to zig where the others zagged. 

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I think Roddy MacDowell is also in Overboard (the original).  I still love watching Big with the huge piano.  I like crime dramas/lawyers/mysteries.  Presumed Innocent, Miss Marple, Anatomy of a Murder, Inherit the Wind, even The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer.  Also like the old Dr. Kildare movies with Lionel Barrymore.  Also like Dinner at Eight, Nick and Nora Thin Man movies, Grand Hotel, Ninotchka.  Some not so great films up there are Double Jeopardy (Ashley Judd and Tommy Lee Jones), It's Complicated, Because I Said So and Somethings Got to Give (with Diane Keaton).

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7 hours ago, DougieB said:

Head's maybe a movie that hasn't aged all that well, but I saw it in a theater at the time of its release and I liked the good-natured corniness of it, as well as the pleasing "soft core" psychedelic effects which didn't seem nearly as forced or phony as in most other "countercultural" movies of the time, such as the grueling The Trip.  I didn't have a TV but I'd seen enough of the shows to understand that the movie was a gentle poke at the absurdity of what had been purposefully, and somewhat crassly, assembled for a television audience. I'm not feeling the idea that there was hostility involved in assembling the movie, however. 

They were a real part of the cultural zeitgeist, no matter how they got there. I think Head reflects the legitimacy, not just that they themselves wanted, but which was given them by some of their contemporaries who saw something in them and took them under their wing. In other hands it could have been a comfortable commercial prospect like the Dave Clark Five and Herman's Hermits movies, but they opted to zig where the others zagged. 

By the second season, angry boredom with the Saturday-morning style of the show was setting in, and no one was grousing about it louder than Rafelson.  (Except for maybe Mike Nesmith, who directed an even snarkier deconstruction-pile of the show to promote the 25th-anniversary reunion tour.)  They wanted to take their legitimacy into a variety show format, but it didn't fit the series, and their off-series appearances on other variety series never quite took off.  The show's other director, James Frawley--who later went on to wrangle the Muppets into their first freeform movie--encouraged a loose ad-lib style, and could have probably done a more free-wheeling fan-friendly psychedelic-sketch movie, but EVERYONE had some bee in their soapbox in trying to make the movie "relevant".  If it wasn't Rafelson piling personal hostility on the image success, it was Nesmith then shocked about the Vietnam atrocities and trying to work it into an anti-war picture, and hippie Peter Tork working in an ecological message, and...oyy.

(Bob did direct the free-form "Monkees in Paris" TV episode, where the characters escape the set to wreak real-world havoc, which could have been a good Dave Clark Five romp movie, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNIQKA3PZCg , but even that episode still had to load down more personal hostility issues about the show's "repetitious" Saturday-morning plots.)

Rafelson, on the disk commentary, still doubles down on his artificial-fame complaints of "They were the Justin Biebers of their day", blaming the teenie fans for being "fooled" by the marketing and not "letting" them move on.   Bob...In the truest "F*** you" spirit on behalf of the fans, if seeing a "fake" group performing darn good Carole King, Neil Diamond and Mike Nesmith songs bothers you so much, then by all means, if you want to complain about "artificially created" singers, whatever you do, DO NOT do a YouTube search for "Hatsune Miku", lest your head explode.  And of whom I also happen to have two dozen songs on my iTunes playlist because they're darn good songs.  😡

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