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MikaelaArsenault

Ennio Morricone, Influential Creator of Music for Modern Cinema, Dies at 91

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And who could forget what many say is the most dramatic final duel in movie history -  

 

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On 7/6/2020 at 5:26 PM, BingFan said:

Several years ago, I was inspired to get a 2-CD set of Morricone's music when I heard a translated interview with him on NPR.  Even though I don't particularly care for some of the associated movies (like the spaghetti westerns, which I find oppressive with their heat and dust and generally unpleasant characters), I found the music extremely captivating.  I also learned from this selection of his music that it varied much more widely in style than I had realized -- not everything was twangy guitars and whistling (although I loved those pieces, too).  These two discs take me into another world.

RIP Maestro.

51-m8F6BZML._SX425_.jpg.191a40dabc5b1462b48ae218a4cf1549.jpg

Beautifully stated.

I bought this double disc CD when it first came out in 1995 since all my other Morricone was on LP.

I have amassed several Morricone soundtracks found at yard sales & thrift stores, even though I never liked any of the movies they were created for. The movies can range from the famous Spaghetti Westerns to romantic dramas to sci-fi and spy intrigues - Morricone music is consistently unique and inspiring.

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The majestic orchestral flourishes and bracing guitar twangs in the movie Once Upon a Time in the West were the most dramatic pieces I think I'd ever heard in a movie up until that time (late 60's). Unforgettable - probably Morricone's greatest work - a triple-themed masterpiece.

Most people I've spoken to are surprised when I mention that my favorite character in that classic film is the character of Cheyenne, played by Jason Robards Jr.  His theme is something of a relief from the monumental themes of Jill and Frank. Many are prone to forget about Cheyenne, ascribing to him a lesser importance to the film - and this tradition seems to carry on in the piece I'm posting below that, although ostensibly his theme, uses only one brief photo of him in the montage. 

From The Journey up until Ballad of Cable Hogue, Robards' screenwork was flawless to me.

 

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carl reiner, kelly preston and ennio

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On 7/10/2020 at 9:25 PM, SadPanda said:

The majestic orchestral flourishes and bracing guitar twangs in the movie Once Upon a Time in the West were the most dramatic pieces I think I'd ever heard in a movie up until that time (late 60's). Unforgettable - probably Morricone's greatest work - a triple-themed masterpiece.

Most people I've spoken to are surprised when I mention that my favorite character in that classic film is the character of Cheyenne, played by Jason Robards Jr.  His theme is something of a relief from the monumental themes of Jill and Frank. Many are prone to forget about Cheyenne, ascribing to him a lesser importance to the film - and this tradition seems to carry on in the piece I'm posting below that, although ostensibly his theme, uses only one brief photo of him in the montage. 

From The Journey up until Ballad of Cable Hogue, Robards' screenwork was flawless to me.

 

my all-time fav score

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so many and only one oscar victory

 

how about once upon a time in america

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On 7/6/2020 at 9:16 AM, jakeem said:

Not a bad idea. On March 6, 2014, TCM focused on Morricone's music by showing films that included "For a Few Dollars More" (1965),  "Death Rides a Pale Horse" (1969) and "The Mercenary" (1970). 

In 2005, the American Film Institute selected the Top 25 movie scores of all time. Morricone's score from "The Mission" was ranked No. 23.

But my favorite score of his is the music from "Once Upon a Time in America" (1984). It likely was not nominated for an Academy Award because of a paperwork screwup.

there it is

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and not  one nomination for '84

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Isn't "influential" wrong in the thread title? The word implies very worthy and therefore influential, but perhaps not much more. Bur Morricone WAS much more, quite clearly one of the greatest of all.

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23 minutes ago, laffite said:

Isn't "influential" wrong in the thread title? The word implies very worthy and therefore influential, but perhaps not much more. Bur Morricone WAS much more, quite clearly one of the greatest of all.

Maybe you could petition the OP to change the thread title using the correct word.

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2 hours ago, SadPanda said:

Maybe you could petition the OP to change the thread title using the correct word.

Morricone is so familiar and universally recognized for excellence that all you need is Ennio Morricone, Dies at 91. The great ones don't need qualifiers.

 

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But the important thing is that "influential" is wrong.

Too bad he didn't say "great one" in the title instead, huh? Then you could have rested easy and not needed to question it.

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When one little panda makes another little panda sad and confused...

that makes me a sad panda.

 

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8 hours ago, laffite said:

Isn't "influential" wrong in the thread title? The word implies very worthy and therefore influential, but perhaps not much more. Bur Morricone WAS much more, quite clearly one of the greatest of all.

Are you saying he's not influential? :huh: I don't understand the nature of your complaint either.

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7 hours ago, SadPanda said:

Too bad he didn't say "great one" in the title instead, huh? Then you could have rested easy and not needed to question it.

Yes, SadPanda, Instead of "influential" he might have said renown, legendary, or celebrated. So, yes. Not a peep from me. :)

...oh, and be sure creator is changed to composer. :ph34r:

2 hours ago, Sukhov said:

Are you saying he's not influential? :huh: I don't understand the nature of your complaint either.

Please read my first post above on this. I've already explained it. He was not MERELY influential, he was much more than that. As in the answer above to SadPanda. So, influential alone is insufficient. It does not reflect his true worth. See now? ;)

///

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8 hours ago, laffite said:

 Instead of "influential" he might have said renown, legendary, or celebrated. So, yes. Not a peep from me. :)

That's really nice of you to not peep - the OP is appreciative of your "non-peep" questioning use of the wrong word in this thread title, I'm sure.

Who among us doesn't enjoy someone suggesting our writing is wrong?

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3 hours ago, SadPanda said:

That's really nice of you to not peep - the OP is appreciative of your "non-peep" questioning use of the wrong word in this thread title, I'm sure.

Who among us doesn't enjoy someone suggesting our writing is wrong?

Sarcasm? That's all you got? If you were thinking you would have found this:

Ennio Morricone, the Italian composer whose atmospheric scores for spaghetti westerns and some 500 films by a Who’s Who of international directors made him one of the world’s most versatile and influential creators of music for the modern cinema, died on Monday in Rome. He was 91. ---New York Times.

This is the body of the article and therefore not a headline or a thread title. Our word influential is outshone by more important accolades,  and does not work all by itself in a one line headline of thread title. The Times did not have even think about it, since it is obviously .... wrong :D

Here is the actual headline in the Times: Ennio Morricone, Oscar-winning Composer of Film Scores, dies at 91. Since the OP was stealing from the Times anyway, why not use this instead of that wrong thread title disaster.

:lol:

///

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