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Legally prevented from airing on TCM


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Just now, txfilmfan said:

Not sure if Miller approved or not, but Lee J. Cobb originated the role on Broadway.

Thanks. I was just about to go to the internet Broadway database.

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Per the ibdb:

The original production of Death of a Salesman ran for 742 performances from 1949-50. 

Opening night cast can be found here:

https://www.ibdb.com/broadway-production/death-of-a-salesman-2111#OpeningNightCast

Robert Simon understudied the part of Willy Loman.

Cameron Mitchell and Mildred Dunnock recreated their roles in the 1951 film version.

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On 7/9/2020 at 12:23 PM, UMO1982 said:

IT'S A WISE CHILD (1931)

WISE.jpg

MARION DAVIES pretends to be pregnant to avoid an arranged marriage to an old man in this racy comedy.

https://filmthreat.com/interviews/in-search-of-marion-davies-interview-with-nick-langdon/?fbclid=IwAR0w5WrSuzNUuEaYcN9EijRS2FjnKlEm7ljQj8xMVPcR0W5hvUxeObZ4ZBg#:~:text=IN SEARCH OF MARION DAVIES%3A INTERVIEW WITH NICK,a Wise Child%2C” starring the much-maligned Marion Davies

A 2009 article about IaWC. The synopsis sounds hilarious, and apparently UCLA and Warners both have good source elements. Wonder if the LOC Audio-Visual Center down in Culpeper takes requests for screenings....

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56 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

https://filmthreat.com/interviews/in-search-of-marion-davies-interview-with-nick-langdon/?fbclid=IwAR0w5WrSuzNUuEaYcN9EijRS2FjnKlEm7ljQj8xMVPcR0W5hvUxeObZ4ZBg#:~:text=IN SEARCH OF MARION DAVIES%3A INTERVIEW WITH NICK,a Wise Child%2C” starring the much-maligned Marion Davies

A 2009 article about IaWC. The synopsis sounds hilarious, and apparently UCLA and Warners both have good source elements. Wonder if the LOC Audio-Visual Center down in Culpeper takes requests for screenings....

Yes, they do..... not sure how pandemic affects this though.

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SUGARFOOT was available for a while in a beautiful 35mm print on ok.ru but it has since been removed.

As for DEATH OF A SALESMAN, the reason for the current absence is simple - literary rights reverted to the Miller estate (nearly all of the Kramer Columbia's except for THE CAINE MUTINY had limited rights. Many have been renegotiated. So far DEATH OF A SALESMAN and THE FOUR POSTER are still M.I.A.  I have 16's of the entire series and Kramer's admiration for Harry Cohn is justified. Despite being almost all box office busts, Cohn let Kramer continue because he was impressed with the pictures. And all the money came back with interest on the release of CAINE.

Fredric March was just wrong for Willy. But Cobb refused to testify before HUAC and Cohn wouldn't use him.  I don't think Miller ever accepted the picture. Aside from Cobb, the picture is also missing two significant originals - Arthur Kennedy (replaced by Kevin McCarthy) and Willy's line "he's crying - why is he crying?". For some inexplicable reason, this line is cut from the feature but appears in the film's original trailer. The film still packs a wallop and the best thing that came from it was Alex North's score adapted for the screen (Robert Drasnin scored the CBS telecast with Cobb & Dunnock). I restored it from scratchy acetates and you can listen to it here:

http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com/deathofasalesman.mp3

 

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28 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

SUGARFOOT was available for a while in a beautiful 35mm print on ok.ru but it has since been removed.

As for DEATH OF A SALESMAN, the reason for the current absence is simple - literary rights reverted to the Miller estate (nearly all of the Kramer Columbia's except for THE CAINE MUTINY had limited rights. Many have been renegotiated. So far DEATH OF A SALESMAN and THE FOUR POSTER are still M.I.A.  I have 16's of the entire series and Kramer's admiration for Harry Cohn is justified. Despite being almost all box office busts, Cohn let Kramer continue because he was impressed with the pictures. And all the money came back with interest on the release of CAINE.

Fredric March was just wrong for Willy. But Cobb refused to testify before HUAC and Cohn wouldn't use him.  I don't think Miller ever accepted the picture. Aside from Cobb, the picture is also missing two significant originals - Arthur Kennedy (replaced by Kevin McCarthy) and Willy's line "he's crying - why is he crying?". For some inexplicable reason, this line is cut from the feature but appears in the film's original trailer. The film still packs a wallop and the best thing that came from it was Alex North's score adapted for the screen (Robert Drasnin scored the CBS telecast with Cobb & Dunnock). I restored it from scratchy acetates and you can listen to it here:

http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com/deathofasalesman.mp3

Interesting tidbits Ray. Why was Kennedy replaced with McCarthy...did they feel Kennedy was too old to play March's son?

Would certainly love to see SUGARFOOT.

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37 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Interesting tidbits Ray. Why was Kennedy replaced with McCarthy...did they feel Kennedy was too old to play March's son?

Would certainly love to see SUGARFOOT.

Not sure. Could be simply that McCarthy came cheaper. He was fine, by the way, just not Kennedy (probably my favorite American actor).  As for SUGARFOOT, it's okay. Best thing is Max's score.

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12 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

Not sure. Could be simply that McCarthy came cheaper. He was fine, by the way, just not Kennedy (probably my favorite American actor).  As for SUGARFOOT, it's okay. Best thing is Max's score.

I figured SUGARFOOT is a routine Warner Brothers western. Randolph Scott made a bunch of them at the studio in the early 50s-- COLT .45 (1950); FORT WORTH (1951); CARSON CITY (1952), etc.

But I'm kind of interested in SUGARFOOT because it has S.Z. Sakall in it. When he was put in westerns like SAN ANTONIO (1945) and MONTANA (1950), it was usually to support Errol Flynn. So I want to see how he plays off Randolph Scott.

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2 hours ago, Ray Faiola said:

As for DEATH OF A SALESMAN, the reason for the current absence is simple - literary rights reverted to the Miller estate (nearly all of the Kramer Columbia's except for THE CAINE MUTINY had limited rights. Many have been renegotiated. So far DEATH OF A SALESMAN and THE FOUR POSTER are still M.I.A.  I have 16's of the entire series and Kramer's admiration for Harry Cohn is justified. Despite being almost all box office busts, Cohn let Kramer continue because he was impressed with the pictures. And all the money came back with interest on the release of CAINE.

 

Interesting that the rights to CBS's  version from the 1980s with Dustin Hoffman and Kate Reid has a different legal status, as it was on TCM a couple of years ago, IIRC.  I know I've seen it sometime in this century.  There was also a version with Brian Dennehy made in 2000.  Both were essentially transfers from recent Broadway productions.

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3 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Interesting that the rights to CBS's  version from the 1980s with Dustin Hoffman and Kate Reid has a different legal status, as it was on TCM a couple of years ago, IIRC.  I know I've seen it sometime in this century.  There was also a version with Brian Dennehy made in 2000.  Both were essentially transfers from recent Broadway productions.

Perhaps the difference is they were approved by Miller's estate and the 1951 film is not.

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3 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Interesting that the rights to CBS's  version from the 1980s with Dustin Hoffman and Kate Reid has a different legal status, as it was on TCM a couple of years ago, IIRC.  I know I've seen it sometime in this century.  There was also a version with Brian Dennehy made in 2000.  Both were essentially transfers from recent Broadway productions.

And I forgot to mention that the 1980s version also had John Malkovich as Biff, who made his Broadway debut with the play the previous year.

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2 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Perhaps the difference is they were approved by Miller's estate and the 1951 film is not.

According to IMDb, Miller personally oversaw the CBS production, so you're probably correct.   One of the production companies was named Roxbury Productions, and he lived in Roxbury, CT.

I wonder if Arthur Miller left instructions for the first filmed version to never see the light of day again (at least, until it enters the public domain)?

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4 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

According to IMDb, Miller personally oversaw the CBS production, so you're probably correct.  

I wonder if Arthur Miller left instructions for the first filmed version to never see the light of day again (at least, until it enters the public domain)?

Seems likely. Willa Cather refused to allow any of her works to  be made into films after her disappointment with A LOST LADY (1934). Then there's J.D. Salinger who didn't like how MY FOOLISH HEART (1949) turned out.

So it's not uncommon for a writer of Miller's caliber to disown an adaptation.

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  • 3 weeks later...

   I think this topic needs an update.  Neither films are classics,but they should be rescued from deterioration:

           THE  ADVENTURES  OF  MARTIN  EDEN  (1942)   Glenn Ford, Claire Trevor,  Evelyn Keyes  and Stu Erwin.   Produced by Samuel Bronston  for Columbia.

      THE JOE  PALOOKA  series of  11  films made at Monogram from 1946-1951 with Joe Kirkwood,Jr., Elyse Knox, Cathy Downs and Leon Errol.

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1 hour ago, Athos said:

Pursued (1947) starring Robert Mitchum and Teresa Wright. It has never aired on TCM and is a Warner Bros picture.

Yes, that's another one missing from the schedules. 

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On 7/16/2020 at 7:49 PM, Ray Faiola said:

SUGARFOOT was available for a while in a beautiful 35mm print on ok.ru but it has since been removed.

As for DEATH OF A SALESMAN, the reason for the current absence is simple - literary rights reverted to the Miller estate (nearly all of the Kramer Columbia's except for THE CAINE MUTINY had limited rights. Many have been renegotiated. So far DEATH OF A SALESMAN and THE FOUR POSTER are still M.I.A.  I have 16's of the entire series and Kramer's admiration for Harry Cohn is justified. Despite being almost all box office busts, Cohn let Kramer continue because he was impressed with the pictures. And all the money came back with interest on the release of CAINE.

Fredric March was just wrong for Willy. But Cobb refused to testify before HUAC and Cohn wouldn't use him.  I don't think Miller ever accepted the picture. Aside from Cobb, the picture is also missing two significant originals - Arthur Kennedy (replaced by Kevin McCarthy) and Willy's line "he's crying - why is he crying?". For some inexplicable reason, this line is cut from the feature but appears in the film's original trailer. The film still packs a wallop and the best thing that came from it was Alex North's score adapted for the screen (Robert Drasnin scored the CBS telecast with Cobb & Dunnock). I restored it from scratchy acetates and you can listen to it here:

http://www.chelsearialtostudios.com/deathofasalesman.mp3

 

It's still there.

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Good to know about SUGARFOOT!

As for PURSUED, even though it's a Warner release, it was a United States Pictures production. The whole package was bought by Richard Feiner, who then sold the films (not ancillary rights) to Republic. So they are now Paramount. Feiner licensed the soundtrack rights to us and we (CR Studios and Screen Archives) released a bunch of them including PURSUED.

pursued.jpg

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4 hours ago, Athos said:

Pursued (1947) starring Robert Mitchum and Teresa Wright. It has never aired on TCM and is a Warner Bros picture.

 

4 hours ago, Athos said:

Pursued (1947) starring Robert Mitchum and Teresa Wright. It has never aired on TCM and is a Warner Bros picture.

PURSUED  was a  WB distributed film made by Milton Sperling's United States Productions who owned the rights. It was available on the old VHS tape and DVD.

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On 7/14/2020 at 10:46 PM, cody1949 said:

  TCM  never tells you why  a film  was pulled. They just do it. They did it with a 1948 film directed by Joseph Mankiewicz in England with Rex Harrison titled ESCAPE.  Has nothing in common with Robert Taylor's MGM film.

This is very frustrating to die-hard TCM fans when this happens.  If it's a problem with the visual or audio quality of the print that's scheduled to be shown, I can see that.  If it's a rights problem with airing a film, you'd think the station's legal team would be up on what it can and cannot show.  When something is originally scheduled, then inexplicably yanked, it would be nice to know why.  Even a simple single letter explanation of 'Q' for Quality or 'R' for Rights would be sufficient (well, for me, anyway).  Having said all this, have we ever figured out why TCM scheduled, then never aired "Lilac Time"?  This 1928 silent film was greatly anticipated by TCM fans here when it popped up on the schedule several years ago, then it got pulled with no explanation, and it hasn't been scheduled since.

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On 8/3/2020 at 6:13 AM, midwestan said:

This is very frustrating to die-hard TCM fans when this happens.  If it's a problem with the visual or audio quality of the print that's scheduled to be shown, I can see that.  If it's a rights problem with airing a film, you'd think the station's legal team would be up on what it can and cannot show.   

Sometimes the legal status of a film changes suddenly. 

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On 8/3/2020 at 9:13 AM, midwestan said:

This is very frustrating to die-hard TCM fans when this happens.  If it's a problem with the visual or audio quality of the print that's scheduled to be shown, I can see that.  If it's a rights problem with airing a film, you'd think the station's legal team would be up on what it can and cannot show.  When something is originally scheduled, then inexplicably yanked, it would be nice to know why.  Even a simple single letter explanation of 'Q' for Quality or 'R' for Rights would be sufficient (well, for me, anyway).  Having said all this, have we ever figured out why TCM scheduled, then never aired "Lilac Time"?  This 1928 silent film was greatly anticipated by TCM fans here when it popped up on the schedule several years ago, then it got pulled with no explanation, and it hasn't been scheduled since.

Actually, I believe "Lilac Time" was yanked twice from the schedule.  I got so frustrated after the second yanking that I found a VHS copy on ebay and bought it.

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REUNION IN VIENNA 1933 John Barrymore

i found this on imdb as i was always seeing this one in my incompleted list :

It was last telecast on cable TV on Showtime in August 1985. Since that time, legal complications involving rights problems arose, and it was withdrawn from public exhibition. Presently, it's in the TCM library, but has yet to be shown, or released on Dvd because of this situation.images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSyXj_HfUucIjWuOMuBDm9

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1 hour ago, nakano said:

REUNION IN VIENNA 1933 John Barrymore

i found this on imdb as i was always seeing this one in my incompleted list :

It was last telecast on cable TV on Showtime in August 1985.

Yes, literary rights - based on a play. I managed to tape that Showtime telecast and still have my original Betamax tape!  I also have an open reel tape of the soundtrack to a live television version of the play with Brian Aherne.

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