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"The City and The Pillar" (1948)


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2 hours ago, jaragon said:

You should read it.

Thanks. I will have to do that. 

I was looking at Gore Vidal's filmography. He adapted more than one work by Tennessee Williams for the screen

I knew he'd adapted SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER (1959), but there's another one called LAST OF THE MOBILE HOT SHOTS (1970). It seems rather obscure but quite interesting.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_of_the_Mobile_Hot_Shots

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1 hour ago, ronnoco28 said:

The City and The Pillar covers the time from the late nineteen thirties until post World War II, which is about 10 years or so. Jim Willard  and Bob Ford start off as teenagers in high-school, and age up to about thirty years old or so.  So whichever actors were chosen to portray them would have to be capable of doing this realistically.

I remember seeing the miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man when it first came out in 1976 on television. The Jordache brothers Tom and Rudy (played by Nick Nolte and Peter Strauss) began as teenagers in high-school, and then aged about 25 years in the course of the series, and it was done very well. 

Interesting you mention Peter Strauss. He was brilliant in the Rich Man Poor Man miniseries.

I watched an episode of The Streets of San Francisco last night. He was playing a prosecutor that learns his father was on the mob's payroll. He was great in all his scenes, especially with William Windom.

Screen Shot 2020-07-11 at 10.16.11 AM.jpeg

 

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Interesting you mention Peter Strauss. He was brilliant in the Rich Man Poor Man miniseries.

I watched an episode of The Streets of San Francisco last night. He was playing a prosecutor that learns his father was on the mob's payroll. He was great in all his scenes, especially with William Windom.

Screen Shot 2020-07-11 at 10.16.11 AM.jpeg

 

Strauss was a good actor but Nick Nolte was smoking hot in  "Rich Man Poor Man"

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23 hours ago, jaragon said:

Strauss was a good actor but Nick Nolte was smoking hot in  "Rich Man Poor Man"

I prefer Strauss. I especially love that beautiful long hair of his in the Streets of San Francisco episode. Love his voice too. 

He guest starred on the program three times. In one of the stories, he portrays a priest killer. Depending on what the script required, he could be the All-American nice guy, or a menacing presence. Certainly demonstrates his range as an actor.

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22 hours ago, jaragon said:

Strauss was a good actor but Nick Nolte was smoking hot in  "Rich Man Poor Man"

I still remember the scene in Rich Man, Poor Man, in which Rudy (Peter Strauss), the conventional, conscientious brother, has gotten up very early in the morning to do his paper-route.  Tom (Nick Nolte), the reckless, smart-aleck  brother, sneaks up behind him in bed, grabs ahold of him, and begins to rough him up. Rudy is upset, tries to free himself, but Tom continues to manhandle him. Tom is probably secretly envious of Rudy's industriousness, and is intentionally making him late for work.  What's occurring is actually typical brotherly rough-housing and sibling rivalry. But at that point, their gruff, severe father (Ed Asner), who's heard what's going on, bursts into the room. He bitterly berates Tom, and what was just a typical brotherly dispute morphs into a bitter tirade that  permanently  affects all three of them. It's quite a powerful scene.  I've never seen the series since, but I still vividly remember that scene from over forty years ago.

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44 minutes ago, ronnoco28 said:

I still remember the scene in Rich Man, Poor Man, in which Rudy (Peter Strauss), the conventional, conscientious brother, has gotten up very early in the morning to do his paper-route.  Tom (Nick Nolte), the reckless, smart-aleck  brother, sneaks up behind him in bed, grabs ahold of him, and begins to rough him up. Rudy is upset, tries to free himself, but Tom continues to manhandle him. Tom is probably secretly envious of Rudy's industriousness, and is intentionally making him late for work.  What's occurring is actually typical brotherly rough-housing and sibling rivalry. But at that point, their gruff, severe father (Ed Asner), who's heard what's going on, bursts into the room. He bitterly berates Tom, and what was just a typical brotherly dispute morphs into a bitter tirade that  permanently  affects all three of them. It's quite a powerful scene.  I've never seen the series since, but I still vividly remember that scene from over forty years ago.

I believe both miniseries (there was a Part II) were released on DVD by NBC/Universal.

Strauss is in both of them, and he's the lead in Part II so he has quite a lot to do.

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44 minutes ago, ronnoco28 said:

I still remember the scene in Rich Man, Poor Man, in which Rudy (Peter Strauss), the conventional, conscientious brother, has gotten up very early in the morning to do his paper-route.  Tom (Nick Nolte), the reckless, smart-aleck  brother, sneaks up behind him in bed, grabs ahold of him, and begins to rough him up. Rudy is upset, tries to free himself, but Tom continues to manhandle him. Tom is probably secretly envious of Rudy's industriousness, and is intentionally making him late for work.  What's occurring is actually typical brotherly rough-housing and sibling rivalry. But at that point, their gruff, severe father (Ed Asner), who's heard what's going on, bursts into the room. He bitterly berates Tom, and what was just a typical brotherly dispute morphs into a bitter tirade that  permanently  affects all three of them. It's quite a powerful scene.  I've never seen the series since, but I still vividly remember that scene from over forty years ago.

Nolte and Strauss were very convincing as very different brothers.  Aren't they arguing because Tom took Rudy's polo shirt?  I also have a vivid memory of a scene in which an older woman tells Tom to strip and get in bed with her. 

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1 minute ago, TopBilled said:

I believe both miniseries (there was a Part II) were released on DVD by NBC/Universal.

Strauss is in both of them, and he's the lead in Part II so he has quite a lot to do.

Part II is not as good because let's face it you can't replace Nick Nolte.

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11 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Nolte and Strauss were very convincing as very different brothers.  Aren't they arguing because Tom took Rudy's polo shirt?  I also have a vivid memory of a scene in which an older woman tells Tom to strip and get in bed with her. 

Last night I watched another episode of The Streets of San Francisco. This time Nick Nolte turned up. He was playing a minor character in a somewhat lengthy scene. Michael Douglas' character has to interrogate him about his whereabouts when a murder occurred. Nolte is sitting with a blanket on his lap. Suddenly he stands up and Douglas realizes he has a wooden leg and would not be able to run like the sniper/killer he's trying to track down. It was a very interesting scene.

Nolte looked young and clean cut in the episode. He had an obvious charm. Just like Douglas. It is no surprise that both Nolte and Douglas would become full-fledged movie stars within a decade. 

Meanwhile Peter Strauss never really became a movie star. He did appear in some feature films yes, and he had a lead role in SOLDIER BLUE (1971) opposite Candice Bergen. But he would find his niche playing leads in TV miniseries. In addition to the Rich Man Poor Man series he also headlined Kane & Abel in the 80s.

Screen Shot 2020-07-12 at 12.47.59 PM

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9 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Part II is not as good because let's face it you can't replace Nick Nolte.

What I like about Part II is that we reach some important turning points for the surviving characters. And the last episode ends on a very shocking note. So it gives you a lot to think about when it's all said and done.

Part I differs because we are getting a lot of the background, how these people started out rather modestly and built themselves up. When Part II begins, Rudy is now hugely successful so his conflicts and dramas have another dimension. There's more at stake, so to speak.

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

What I like about Part II is that we reach some important turning points for the surviving characters. And the last episode ends on a very shocking note. So it gives you a lot to think about when it's all said and done.

Part I differs because we are getting a lot of the background, how these people started out rather modestly and built themselves up. When Part II begins, Rudy is now hugely successful so his conflicts and dramas have another dimension. There's more at stake, so to speak.

Part I also deals with a primal concept - the love/hate brother relationship - and it also had Nolte as sex symbol

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Just now, jaragon said:

Part I also deals with a primal concept - the love/hate brother relationship - and it also had Nolte as sex symbol

And the competing brothers story is repeated in Kane & Abel, that time with Peter Strauss opposite Sam Neill.

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3 minutes ago, jaragon said:

Peter Strauss was in great shape when he did this role...

 

Oh yes! Thanks for posting this. Like I said earlier, I love his long hair. He went all GQ in the 80s.

He has a perfect nose and perfect lips.

Screen Shot 2020-07-12 at 2.35.37 PM.png

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Last night I watched another episode of The Streets of San Francisco. This time Nick Nolte turned up. He was playing a minor character in a somewhat lengthy scene. Michael Douglas' character has to interrogate him about his whereabouts when a murder occurred. Nolte is sitting with a blanket on his lap. Suddenly he stands up and Douglas realizes he has a wooden leg and would not be able to run like the sniper/killer he's trying to track down. It was a very interesting scene.

Nolte looked young and clean cut in the episode. He had an obvious charm. Just like Douglas. It is no surprise that both Nolte and Douglas would become full-fledged movie stars within a decade. 

Meanwhile Peter Strauss never really became a movie star. He did appear in some feature films yes, and he had a lead role in SOLDIER BLUE (1971) opposite Candice Bergen. But he would find his niche playing leads in TV miniseries. In addition to the Rich Man Poor Man series he also headlined Kane & Abel in the 80s.

Screen Shot 2020-07-12 at 12.47.59 PM

I posted the clip from "Streets of San Francisco" in the Male Beauty on Screen thread.  Nolte had that classic All American jock look

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