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Actors/actresses' swan songs.


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12 hours ago, EricJ said:

Which Fox later retitled Call of the Wild.  (So as to avoid confusion with Disney's 90's "White Fang".)

That’s dumb because they are two different stories.  White Fang is about a wolf becoming captured & tamed, while the other is a domestic dog that turns wild (and escapes into the woods).

Soooo if Fox or someone decided to make the Actual Call of the Wild what would they call it!

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3 hours ago, Davehat said:

That’s dumb because they are two different stories.  White Fang is about a wolf becoming captured & tamed, while the other is a domestic dog that turns wild (and escapes into the woods).

Soooo if Fox or someone decided to make the Actual Call of the Wild what would they call it!

No, you didn't get it. In a previous post, I inadvertently referred to Ford's latest movie as "White Fang" instead of "The Call of the Wild."

But when you think about it, "White Fang" is "The Call of the Wild" in reverse.

See the source image
 

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1 hour ago, sewhite2000 said:

I don't want to start repeating stars. I went back through all four pages, and I couldn't find Joan Crawford in Trog anywhere, so ...

Joan Crawford in Trog (1970)

I think she had some television appearances after this. Yes, it was her last feature film but it was not the last thing she did.

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Dame Olivia de Havilland made her final appearance in a feature-length picture in "The 5th Musketeer," a 1979 swashbuckling film set in 17th century France and based on Alexandre Dumas the Elder's tale about the legendary "Man in the Iron Mask." Beau Bridges had the dual roles of King Louis XIV and Philippe of Gascony, Louis' little-known twin brother. De Havilland appeared as their mother. Although this was her last film, the actress continued to take occasional television roles. 
 
Image result for olivia de havilland the fifth musketeer
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Charles Bickford's final film was A Big Hand for the Little Lady (1966), a highly entertaining film with a wonderful cast: Henry Fonda, Joanne Woodward, Jason Robards, Paul Ford, Burgess Meredith, Kevin McCarthy, Robert Middleton, and John Qualen. 

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5 hours ago, jakeem said:

No, you didn't get it. In a previous post, I inadvertently referred to Ford's latest movie as "White Fang" instead of "The Call of the Wild."

But when you think about it, "White Fang" is "The Call of the Wild" in reverse.
 

UNLESS of course and as previously mentioned,  he's playin' checkers with Soupy Sales.

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THE MISFITS (1961) was the last film for Clark Gable and Marilyn Monroe. Gable died about two weeks after the filming was complete, and Monroe died about two years later not having completed another film. One film Monroe started was "Something's Got to Give",  which was never completed and later revamped as MOVE OVER, DARLING (1963) - and that film featured Thelma Ritter,  who is part of the overall exceptional cast in THE MISFITS.

In addition to Gable, Monroe, and Ritter, there is Montgomery Clift, Eli Wallach, Estelle Winwood, and (in my opinion) the always under-appreciated Kevin McCarthy. And, inevitably perhaps, there is a cameo appearance by the film's director, John Huston.

More, THE MISFITS includes the final film role for former cowboy star Rex Bell, husband to Clara Bow, and the Lieutenant Governor of Nevada at the time THE MISFITS was filmed in and near Reno.

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Just to switch things up:  Deforest Kelley (Dr McCoy) did his last movie in 1991 (The Undiscovered Country).   My personal favorite, and his performance was great: “I’d give real money if that Klingon would shutup.”   😉  ; ) 

He was also the first main Star Trek actor to die:  https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0102975

Star_Trek_VI-poster.png

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I was surprised to learn Robert Mitchum's final film was The Sunset Boys, a Norwegian film, though almost entirely in English, with him and Cliff Robertson. Not a spectacular imdb score, but some reviewers appear to have been quite moved by it.

Robert Mitchum, Erland Josephson, and Cliff Robertson in Pakten (1995)

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I see I'm the last person to post on here almost 24 hours ago. I will stop after this is everyone else has abandoned it, but I had this photo ready to go already. Here is Elizabeth Taylor's final film appearance as Wilma's mother in the live-action version of The Flintstones:

Elizabeth Taylor in The Flintstones (1994)

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On 7/18/2020 at 6:52 AM, Davehat said:

Just to switch things up:  Deforest Kelley (Dr McCoy) did his last movie in 1991 (The Undiscovered Country).   My personal favorite, and his performance was great: “I’d give real money if that Klingon would shutup.”   😉  ; ) 

And not to mention--as Shatner's Kirk shares a kiss with alien Iman as part of an escape plan--quote:  "....What IS it with you, anyway?"

Fortunately, Kelley already got his perfect send-off in the TNG pilot episode:

 

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On 7/14/2020 at 8:29 PM, TopBilled said:

Every actor has a swan song.

It will be interesting to see how some of today's big stars end their careers. 

People like Julia Roberts, Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock and Tom Cruise. Will they go out on a high note, or just quietly fade from view.

I suppose some of them "age out" of leading roles and cannot successfully transition to older character parts. Some of them have a hard time adjusting after having been a lead star for many years, to being faced with supporting roles, so they just walk away.

Streaming TV brings a whole new dynamic to how actors choose to conduct their careers. Julia Roberts has already transitioned to Amazon Prime, for example.

I don't think its necessarily about ageing out of starring roles, while of course this does happen. With so many streaming options and not so much content, any actor with a name can get projects done that they could never get into the big screens. And the money is good enough to be able to do projects of their choice and still make a living.

Eddie Murphy said himself that Dolemite Is My Name (2019), couldn't have been made by traditional means. Martin Scorsese and Spike Lee are capable of making big screen movies but, they are choosing to go the streaming route for more creative control. That last Scorsese film probably wouldn't have been as long had it been made for the theaters. But, for home viewing where a person can pause and watch later, it worked.

I think many of today's stars will simply move to streaming. Some of them seamlessly. Similar to the early 70's when actors transitioned to TV movies and series.

 

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Believe it or don't but Jack Benny's final screen appearance was as himself in "The Man," the 1972 drama in which James Earl Jones played America's fictional first Black president.

See the source image

See the source image

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6 hours ago, jakeem said:

Believe it or don't but Jack Benny's final screen appearance was as himself in "The Man," the 1972 drama in which James Earl Jones played America's fictional first Black president.

Which prevented him from taking Walter Matthau's role in the early casting for The Sunshine Boys.

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I was an extra in Judy Berlin 2000 and no I didn't get to meet Madeline Kahn who sadlly made her film  performance in this highly acclaimed movie.  I think if she had lived she may have gotten an Oscar nomination and even won.  Taken so young and had so much to offer us and were robbed of movies that could have been.  I wish TCM woulld play this film.madeline-kahn-judy-berlin-9-1024x640.png

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Greta Garbo was re-paired with Melvyn Douglas for Two-Faced Woman, her final film at age 36, then she lived nearly another 50 years as one of the world's most famous recluses.

Greta Garbo in Two-Faced Woman (1941)

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