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Dame Olivia de Havilland (1916-2020)


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if anyone is looking to screen one of Miss DeHavilland's not-as-well-known parts, I recommend DEVOTION (released in 1946, but made in 1943) in which she and IDA LUPINO play CHARLOTTE and EMILY BRONTE- OLIVIA being practically perfect as prim and proper CHARLOTTE- and still managing to be very likable all the while. She and PAUL HENREID pair really well together and the sets are great as is the score by KORNGOLD (I think...?) It is, um, not exactly historically accurate- and ARTHUR KENNEDY  LAYS ON THE THE HAM BIG TIME as the ne'er do well brother BRAMWELL- but it's still an engaging watch.

you may notice MISS DeHAVILLAND is not the focus of the trailer, this would be due (I bet) to her contract dispute with Warner's.

 

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Lady in a Cage (1964) is a Surprisingly Prescient Time Capsule ...

Lady In A Cage (1964) was one of her later films. Though it is Baby Jane exploitation item, and unpleasant at times, Olivia is fantastic as the disabled woman held hostage in her own house by thugs. And there is a shocker of an ending.

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

 

Lady In A Cage (1964) was one of her later films. Though it is Baby Jane exploitation item, and unpleasant at times, Olivia is fantastic as the disabled woman held hostage in her own house by thugs. And there is a shocker of an ending.

FOR A WHILE AT LEAST, this film was available on youtube.

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Without question the most poignant scene that Olivia de Havilland ever shared with Errol Flynn was their final scene in They Died With Their Boots On. It depicts the moment of farewell between General Custer and his wife just before he departs for the Little Big Horn, and it is played by both participants as they though have a foreboding that he will not return. Both actors are beautifully restrained in their portrayal of emotions, in contrast to Max Steiner's sweeping musical score which pounds on the viewer's heart strings. I recall calling this scene "a small masterpiece of suppressed emotion' in a letter that I sent to Miss de Havilland many years ago.

In real life, of course, it's well known that the two stars did have strong feelings for one another, Flynn later writing that he fell in love with Olivia while making Charge of the Light Brigade and Olivia, while stating that their relationship remained chaste because of Errol's marriage, saying that her feelings for him were very real, and she still felt that way about him as late as in a 2009 interview.

What adds to the power of the departure scene in They Died With Their Boots On is that fact that this was the two actors' final film together. What's more, when they played this scene, both Errol and Olivia knew that they would probably never co-star again. The scene, in that respect, can be seen as a farewell between the two actors as much as it is between the characters they were playing.

I read that in 1978, long after Flynn's death, Olivia attended a special presentation of this film in Los Angeles. But as the film approached the farewell scene Olivia left her seat and went into the lobby and wept. After all those years the scene still had so much emotional resonance for the lady that she could not bear to watch it again.

murieron-con-las-botas-puestas-errol-fly

"Travelling through life with you, M'am, has been a very gracious thing."

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Without question the most poignant scene that Olivia de Havilland ever shared with Errol Flynn was their final scene in They Died With Their Boots On. It depicts the moment of farewell between General Custer and his wife just before he departs for the Little Big Horn, and it is played by both participants as they though have a foreboding that he will not return. Both actors are beautifully restrained in their portrayal of emotions, in contrast to Max Steiner's sweeping musical score which pounds on the viewer's heart strings. I recall calling this scene "a small masterpiece of suppressed emotion' in a letter that I sent to Miss de Havilland many years ago.

In real life, of course, it's well known that the two stars did have strong feelings for one another, Flynn later writing that he fell in love with Olivia while making Charge of the Light Brigade and Olivia, while stating that their relationship remained chaste because of Errol's marriage, saying that her feelings for him were very real, and she still felt that way about him as late as in a 2009 interview.

What adds to the power of the departure scene in They Died With Their Boots On is that fact that this was the two actors' final film together. What's more, when they played this scene, both Errol and Olivia knew that they would probably never co-star again. The scene, in that respect, can be seen as a farewell between the two actors as much as it is between the characters they were playing.

I read that in 1978, long after Flynn's death, Olivia attended a special presentation of this film in Los Angeles. But as the film approached the farewell scene Olivia left her seat and went into the lobby and wept. After all those years the scene still had so much emotional resonance for the actress that she could not bear to watch it again.

murieron-con-las-botas-puestas-errol-fly

Definitely the most poignant  scene between them and I can understand why it would affect her so, considering how strongly she felt about him.

Errol and Olivia were one of the best screen teams ever. They will live on forever on film.

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I think ROBERT OSBOURNE told a story about BETTE DAVIS and OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND at a decades later viewing of THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939) and BETTE said to OLIVIA that ERROL was much better than she had realized when they had worked together on the film... 

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15 hours ago, Oneeyeopen said:

Olivia is one Actress I never get tired of watching. Her , Davis, Lana Turner and Deborah Kerr.

I found that the last surviving member of GWTW is  Mickey a Kuhn aka Theodore Matthew Michael Kuhn Jr. He played her son Beau in the film. He is 87 years old.

We may have to wait until September for TCM to honor her but it will be worth the wait. I know they will do right by this amazing actress.

Honorable mention for the stars still with us, Marge Champion will be 101 in September, Janis Paige will be 98 in September, Jimmy Lydon of Henry Aldrich fame is 97, Rhonda Fleming will be 97 next month and Rex Downing who played Heathcliff as a boy in Wuthering Heights  and Tyrone Power’s character as a boy in Blood and Sand is 95 years old.

The oldest living Oscar winner is now Sidney Poitier, who is 93 years old.

 

 

 

 

If you count Honorary Oscars it would be Angela Lansbury who will be 95 later this year.

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

I think ROBERT OSBOURNE told a story about BETTE DAVIS and OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND at a decades later viewing of THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939) and BETTE said to OLIVIA that ERROL was much better than she had realized when they had worked together on the film... 

Osbourne told a funny story of being Olivia's partner at the Oscars.     There is video of Bette coming up to Olivia and her introducing R.O. to Bette.   Bette gives a funny look,  like "well what do we have her,,,  Olivia,   has a young stud,,,,",     since Bette didn't know why Olivia would being younger man to the Oscars with her.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

I think ROBERT OSBOURNE told a story about BETTE DAVIS and OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND at a decades later viewing of THE PRIVATE LIVES OF ELIZABETH AND ESSEX (1939) and BETTE said to OLIVIA that ERROL was much better than she had realized when they had worked together on the film... 

BURT REYNOLDS has told the same story too. (Maybe the same screening?) According to him [and I PARAPHRASE] "Bette smoked 147 cigarettes and when the film was over she leaned back and said 'you know what? [Errol] was damned good!'"

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I gasped when I saw this on the bottom of a TV screen yesterday. (at times like this, I wish I had internet at home) It greatly saddened me, even though we all knew it would be coming some day. It feels like we have lost one of the last few greats of the classic era, and aside from Jane Withers, the last real link to the 1930s golden age.

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Osbourne told a funny story of being Olivia's partner at the Oscars.     There is video of Bette coming up to Olivia and her introducing R.O. to Bette.   Bette gives a funny look,  like "well what do we have her,,,  Olivia,   has a young stud,,,,",     since Bette didn't know why Olivia would being younger man to the Oscars with her.

 

 

Yes'm  I've been watching TCM a long time. :)

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26 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Also I wish there had been more coverage of her passing on TV. It has not been mentioned much.

I wonder if the timing of the John Lewis death had an impact on coverage:      We interrupt this tribute to a civil rights leader with the news of the death of the star of Gone with the Wind....

 

 

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I wonder if the timing of the John Lewis death had an impact on coverage:      We interrupt this tribute to a civil rights leader with the news of the death of the star of Gone with the Wind....

 

 

Maybe. That could be it. 

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9 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I wonder if the timing of the John Lewis death had an impact on coverage:      We interrupt this tribute to a civil rights leader with the news of the death of the star of Gone with the Wind....

 

 

Also Regis passed away like a day before and was a huge television legend so that’s going to get the most coverage on the news. Between him and Olivia, I had no idea John Saxon died, take about being overshadowed. 

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It seems the older you are the less hoopla there is. NBC devoted around 3 mins to her death on the Sunday news program and early in the broadcast. So she wasn't dismissed. Sadly many people under 40 probably dont know who she is. Tv stars (Philbin) always get greater coverage.

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The CBS This Morning  did a nice piece on her today.  However, it was in the second hour of the program long after tributes to John Lewis and Regis had aired.  Still, happy they gave her some airtime that covered her career.

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18 minutes ago, Hibi said:

It seems the older you are the less hoopla there is. NBC devoted around 3 mins to her death on the Sunday news program and early in the broadcast. So she wasn't dismissed. Sadly many people under 40 probably dont know who she is. Tv stars (Philbin) always get greater coverage.

I'm hoping she will be on the cover of People and Entertainment Weekly next week.

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