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Dame Olivia de Havilland (1916-2020)


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14 hours ago, jakeem said:

Just keep in mind that this was the cover of Entertainment Weekly magazine after Bob Hope died at the age of 100 in July 2003.

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If Bob wasn't dead already that cover may have done it.

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I just herd yesterday morning on Good Morning America when they were talking about Regis Philbin.  That’s too bad.  She was another really wonderful actress.  Wasn’t she?  Especially with Errol Flynn.  Wasn’t she?  They were really great together.  Weren’t they?  They’re probably together right now.  She will really be missed.  Including by myself.  The Adventures Of Robin Hood is one of my very favorites.  I could watch it over and over again.  They were both really great together in that weren’t they and in all the movies they did together too and all her movies are great too.  The very first time I saw The Adventures Of Robin Hood.  A friend of mine and my parents who was a contractor.  Had it on VHS and we talked about Robin Hood Prince Of Thieves with Kevin Costner and he goes.  I’ll let you see the old Robin Hood and he let me barrow it and I just loved it and that was when I first learned about Errol Flynn and Olivia De Haveland too and I’ve really loved them ever since.  My guess is they’ll probably pay tribute to her in September.  I’ll be really looking forward to it.  I can’t wait.  Olivia.  We all really love you and we’ll all really miss you.  RIP.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I liked the book, but I remember being kinda iffy on this movie...one thing about it that put me off- I went in knowing that RICHARD BURTON was nominated for BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR for it back in 1952, so I kept expecting him to take a back seat to OLIVIA or maybe for there to have been a surprise rewrite where his character dies or gets sent to the Looney Bin or something, but no: he is ON SCREEN FOR LIKE 99.999% of the movie- which was odd because I know that happens nowadays all the time, but it was weird to see it happen 60 years ago.

**IT MIGHT even hold a record for the most screen time ever in the supporting category.

 

7 hours ago, jakeem said:

I have a feeling this guy might be a close second.

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Burton's screentime in supporting for My Cousin Rachel is a close second in the longest performances ever nominated in leading stakes. A person I knew once made a list of the 20 longest performances nominated in supporting. I'm retyping the list here for the two of you..... the people in bold won.....

1. Frank Finley in Othello (1965) -- 90 minutes, 43 seconds

2. Richard Burton in My Cousin Rachel (1952) -- 83 minutes , 57 seconds

3. Jennifer Jones in Since You Went Away (1944) -- 75 minutes, 38 seconds

4. Ethan Hawke in Training Day (2001) -- 74 minutes, 27 seconds

5. John Ireland in All the King's Men (1949) -- 73 minutes, 18 seconds

6. Peter Firth in Equus (1977) -- 73 minutes, 1 second

7. Randy Quaid in The Last Detail (1973) -- 70 minutes, 41 seconds

8. Rooney Mara in Carol (2015) -- 70 minutes, 37 seconds

9. Gene Hackman in I Never Sang for My Father (1970) -- 68 minutes, 9 seconds

10. Charles Coburn in The Devil and Miss Jones (1941)  -- 67 minutes, 35 seconds

11. Tatum O'Neal in Paper Moon (1973) -- 66 minutes, 58 seconds

12. Mahershala Ali in Green Book (2018) -- 66 minutes, 38 seconds

13. Jeff Bridges in Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974) -- 66 minutes, 23 seconds

14. Al Pacino in The Godfather (1972) -- 66 minutes, 22 seconds

15. Christoph Waltz in Django Unchained (2012) -- 66 minutes, 17 seconds

16. Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker (1962) -- 65 minutes, 43 seconds

17. River Phoenix in Running on Empty (1988) -- 65 minutes, 12 seconds

18. Phillip Seymour Hoffman in The Master (2012) -- 65 minutes, 11 seconds

19. Timothy Hutton in Ordinary People (1980) -- 65 minutes, 4 seconds

20. Jaime Foxx in Collateral (2004) -- 64 minutes, 13 seconds

 

Brad Pitt's screentime in Once Upon a Time in Hollywood is 55 minutes, 12 seconds, making his performance the 13th longest winning performance in the history of the supporting categories , behind the five in bold above, plus in order: Haing S Ngor/The killing Fields (1984), Jack Albertson/The Subject Was Roses (1968), Christopher Walken/The Deer Hunter (1978), Alicia Vikander in The Danish Girl (2015), Peter Ustinov in Topkapi (1964), Walter Matthau in The Fortune Cookie (1966), and, surprisingly, Shelley Winters in The Diary of Anne Frank (1959) who beats Pitt's screentime by 2 seconds.

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For the record, the 20 shortest nominated performances:

1. Hermoine Baddeley in Room at the Top (1959) -- 2 minutes, 19 seconds

2. Ethel Barrymore in The Paradine Case (1947) -- 3 minutes , 52 seconds

3. Claire Trevor in Dead End (1937) -- 4 minutes, 22 seconds

4. Maria Ouspenskaya in Dodsworth (1936) -- 4 minutes, 57 seconds

5. Beatrice Straight in Network (1976) -- 5 minutes, 2 seconds

6. Jane Alexander in All the President's Men (1976) -- 5 minutes, 9 seconds

7. Sylvia Miles in Midnight Cowboy (1969) -- 5 minutes, 19 seconds

8. Judi Dench in Shakespeare in Love (1998) -- 5 minutes, 52 seconds

9. Ned Beatty in Network (1976) -- 6 minutes

10. Carolyn Jones in The Bachelor Party (1957)  -- 6 minutes, 1 second

11. John Marley in Love Story (1970) -- 6 minutes, 3 seconds

12. Geraldine Page in The Pope of Greenwich Village (1984) -- 6 minutes, 6 seconds

13. Ruby Dee in American Gangster (2007) -- 6 minutes, 10 seconds

14. Basil Rathbone in Romeo and Juliet (1936) -- 6 minutes, 16 seconds

15. John Lithgow in Terms of Endearment (1983) -- 6 minutes, 28 seconds

16. Diane Cilento in Tom Jones (1963) -- 6 minutes, 34 seconds

17. Maximillian Schell in Julia (1977) -- 6 minutes, 49 seconds

18. Thelma Ritter in Pillow Talk (1959) -- 6 minutes, 58 seconds

19. Holly Hunter in The Firm (1993) -- 7 minutes, 24 seconds

20. Charles Durning in The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas (1982) -- 7 minutes, 26 seconds

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On 7/27/2020 at 8:09 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

if anyone is looking to screen one of Miss DeHavilland's not-as-well-known parts, I recommend DEVOTION (released in 1946, but made in 1943) in which she and IDA LUPINO play CHARLOTTE and EMILY BRONTE- OLIVIA being practically perfect as prim and proper CHARLOTTE- and still managing to be very likable all the while. She and PAUL HENREID pair really well together and the sets are great as is the score by KORNGOLD (I think...?) It is, um, not exactly historically accurate- and ARTHUR KENNEDY  LAYS ON THE THE HAM BIG TIME as the ne'er do well brother BRAMWELL- but it's still an engaging watch.

you may notice MISS DeHAVILLAND is not the focus of the trailer, this would be due (I bet) to her contract dispute with Warner's.

 

I think my opinion would be that Ida Lupino takes this movie and that's why she's the focus of the trailer.

But admittedly I'm very prejudiced.:D

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

If Bob wasn't dead already that cover may have done it.

LOL. They arent interested in anyone dying over 50........

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21 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Olivia will probably be in a tiny picture in the upper right-hand corner, and Prince Harry & Meaghan (or whomever) will have a big cover story about how they're struggling with privacy, or some other inane story.

OIivia would more likely get a cover on that magazine (Closer?)  that seems to give covers to movie and television stars.

Sadly, yes.

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One of my favorite Olivia films is It's Love I'm After.   This film showed that Olivia could do comedy and it was a break for Howard and Davis,  since the other two films they did (which are first rate), were dramas.

 

 

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1 hour ago, lavenderblue19 said:

No kidding. that poster has nothing to do with the film LOL

It looks like the cover of one of those cheesy romance novels about the Duke or the Prince! 

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4 hours ago, Vautrin said:

If Bob wasn't dead already that cover may have done it.

ROFL.  Another example of 30-40 years of dumbed-down American "entertainment" which caters to the lowest common denominator to sell tickets, instead of aspiring to make quality films/movies/TV shows.   Another reason I haven't watched TV prime time for DECADES.... and probably never will again.  That and the end of REAL journalism and rise of corp. "info/opinion" in lieu of objective news.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

Sadly, yes.

Don't bet on it, Hibi!

I've seen more and more "vapid" so-called [non] "celebrities" like Harry and "MeAgain" Markle showing up on the covers, in the pages, of Closer.  Closer, like every other mag, loves $$$ and tries to stay relevant to attract a younger, dumb-down crowd by featuring their "idols" on the covers....sigh...

 

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I meant that Olivia would be in the corner of the cover of People or EW. I know Closer is a mix but she has a better chance there.

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22 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

He was gorgeous.... up until the mustache. 

Montgomery Clift does NOT have a mustache face.

You know what though? I don't like it when Clift smiles.  There's something unsettling about his smile, I can't even describe it.  Moody and brooding is how I want my Clift.

I agree with you about Montgomery Clift with the mustache. He's less attractive the mustache.

But I love his smile in THE HEIRESS.

tumblr_m7owvsSGDS1qa01emo2_500.gif

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4 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

1. Frank Finley in Othello (1965) -- 90 minutes, 43 seconds

Finlay played Iago to Olivier's Othello. In Shakespeare's play, Iago actually has more lines than Othello.

 

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13 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I liked the book, but I remember being kinda iffy on this movie...one thing about it that put me off- I went in knowing that RICHARD BURTON was nominated for BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR for it back in 1952, so I kept expecting him to take a back seat to OLIVIA or maybe for there to have been a surprise rewrite where his character dies or gets sent to the Looney Bin or something, but no: he is ON SCREEN FOR LIKE 99.999% of the movie- which was odd because I know that happens nowadays all the time, but it was weird to see it happen 60 years ago.

**IT MIGHT even hold a record for the most screen time ever in the supporting category.

Yeah, I was like "Huh?" when I heard that Richard Burton was nominated in the SUPPORTING actor category for MY COUSIN RACHEL.

I had a similar reaction about Timothy Hutton in ORDINARY PEOPLE, who won in that category. He competed against Judd Hirsch, whose role in the same movie was what I'd call an actual supporting role in terms of screen time.  

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5 hours ago, Hibi said:

LOL. They arent interested in anyone dying over 50........

For the most part, true. I can see things from their perspective--an elderly movie star from the studio era

of Hollywood isn't as likely to elicit reaction as someone much younger or more in the news. That's just

the way things work. I thought Olivia was a lovely woman and wonderful actress. The local paper had

a long story about her death and career. 

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3 hours ago, kate333 said:

ROFL.  Another example of 30-40 years of dumbed-down American "entertainment" which caters to the lowest common denominator to sell tickets, instead of aspiring to make quality films/movies/TV shows.   Another reason I haven't watched TV prime time for DECADES.... and probably never will again.  That and the end of REAL journalism and rise of corp. "info/opinion" in lieu of objective news.

I'm guessing that American entertainment has been like that for a long time, longer than 30 or 40 years ago.

I don't watch a lot of contemporary TV. I think it has more to do with my age than the quality of the programs.

If I was twenty years old again I'd probably be watching it just as I did when I was twenty myself. There are

always some quality programs around, one just has to look for them.

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Queer Eye was often publicized as something new and bold, but I was always amused at how

old-fashioned it really was. How to do your hair, what to where, how to prepare the proper

food and drink, suggestions as to music and topics to discuss. A lot of the usual superficial

stuff.  It was like a slightly updated version of a 1950s video on how to catch a husband.

For all that it was quite entertaining. 

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4 minutes ago, Allhallowsday said:

I was just reading about him.  Good job!

Nehemiah Persoff:   Just saw him on Adam-12.    Fine actor that I have enjoyed for decades.     Great to see he is still with us.

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Years ago, Morley Safer interviewed Olivia deHavilland on 60 Minutes. I hope they re-air that charming interview. I remember how Morley was so in awe sitting next to Olivia and talking to her. I'll watch out for the interview, if it going to be shown, I'll post the info 

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20 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

 

Burton's screentime in supporting for My Cousin Rachel is a close second in the longest performances ever nominated in leading stakes. A person I knew once made a list of the 20 longest performances nominated in supporting. I'm retyping the list here for the two of you..... the people in bold won.....

1. Frank Finley in Othello (1965) -- 90 minutes, 43 seconds

2. Richard Burton in My Cousin Rachel (1952) -- 83 minutes , 57 seconds

 

THANK YOU FOR THIS!

I can't believe I actually was in the ballpark.

I think some PRESS AGENTS got HUNGRY in the 1950's and realized a supporting OSCAR was still an OSCAR and BURTON'S nomination for MY COUSIN RACHEL is, I think, the earliest example of someone being sneaky with a lead. This begat SINATRA and LEMMON (who were already leading men) winning in 53 and 55 and the 1956 nominations of leading men DON MURRAY in BUS STOP and ROBERT STACK in WRITTEN ON THE WIND [eta- MICKEY ROONEY was also nominated, can't remember the name of the film tho], all three of whom lost to ANTHONY QUINN for his 2 scenes in LUST FOR LIFE.that one controversial win pretty much put the KIBOSH on BIG STARS in the supporting category for a while.

It wasn't until the 1990's that they started getting sneaky with huge STARS and LEADING PARTS in the supporting categories, now of course, it's run amok.

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