Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Dame Olivia de Havilland Memorial Tribute-- 24 Hours August 23


Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

The only two things I can guess is maybe they felt Wayne had been featured a lot with the John Ford tribute this month, or because of the controversy surrounding the John Wayne airport.

I would suspect TCM was being proactive replacing Wayne in the midst of the BLM protests. They didn’t want all the grief they’d get on social media. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I would suspect TCM was being proactive replacing Wayne in the midst of the BLM protests. They didn’t want all the grief they’d get on social media. 

That is one theory,  but I really hope it isn't true.     If TCM programmers have to consider current events when setting up their schedules,  months in advance,,,, well,,,, that borders on insanity. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gone With The Wind was the turning point in Olivia de Havilland's career. The role of Melania gave Olivia the status as an actress that had been denied to her previously, and only fired her ambition for stronger roles. Yes, Jack Warmer punished her with her subsequent roles at Warners to make her know "her place"but that did nothing to squash her ambition for stronger roles.

Who knows if she would have even been in the running for Hold Back the Dawn if it had not been for GWTW. That same year, 1941, even Jack Warner finally gave her an effective role in which she would shine in The Strawberry Blonde. But the seriousness taken in her as an actress (and not just a pretty ornament in an Errol Flynn film) began with her performance as Melanie in the most popular film of 1939.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Hibi said:

WOW. Bette wont like that. I dont think they've EVER pre-empted a SUTS for anything since it started!

Doris Day got bumped one year due to a change to Robert Duvall when TCM was able to lease The Godfather 1 & 2 for a one time showing. I think it was a sort of last minute thing—like the programmers didn’t get the lease nailed down until about 4-6 weeks before showing them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That was a specifically weird incident where TCM literally had one day where they could show Godfathers I & II for the first and probably only time ever, and they apparently had enough other Duvall films readily available to give him a SUTS day. I was watching.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish Strawberry Blonde was on the list of films being shown.  I remember that French film retrospective where the speaker spoke of American films and said everything by Raoul Walsh was crap except for Strawberry Blonde.    I happen to disagree with that statement about Walsh, but that French film directors recognized this little gem is significant.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I wish Strawberry Blonde was on the list of films being shown.  I remember that French film retrospective where the speaker spoke of American films and said everything by Raoul Walsh was crap except for Strawberry Blonde.    I happen to disagree with that statement about Walsh, but that French film directors recognized this little gem is significant.

 

 

I view  The Strawberry Blonde as one of the top 3 best roles for Olivia during her time under contract at WB.   

I highly recommend people read the December 20th 1948 issues of Time.   Olivia is featured on the cover related to the release of the film The Snake Pit.      The caption under the cover photo is "A lost day is hard to find".    

I have the actual magazine.     I purchased it around 20 years ago for $50 dollars.     The actual cost, as printed on the cover,  in 1948,  was Twenty Cents.    (and in the left hand corner it say $6.50 A Year).        Some may say I over paid but it is my most treasured and unique film related item I have.      

The actual article is well written and a good read.   Hopefully one can find it on the Net (and for less than $50!).

TIME Magazine -- U.S. Edition -- December 20, 1948 Vol. LII No. 25

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I wish Strawberry Blonde was on the list of films being shown.  I remember that French film retrospective where the speaker spoke of American films and said everything by Raoul Walsh was crap except for Strawberry Blonde.    I happen to disagree with that statement about Walsh, but that French film directors recognized this little gem is significant.

 

 

I don't have much respect for that French critic's opinion about Raoul Walsh films, even if he is right about The Strawberry Blonde. By the way, Olivia had such a pleasant experience working with Walsh on this film that she recommended him as director to Errol Flynn when the latter was looking for someone to helm his upcoming epic They Died With Their Boots On. Flynn was a big enough star then that he could have a say as to who directed him (having severed relations with Mike Curtiz that same year, with Jack Warner's agreement). Olivia, of course, much to Flynn's surprise (relations between them had reached a low point during their previous film together Santa Fe Trail in which Errol acted the prima donna on the set and was also undoubtedly jealous that she was dating Jimmy Stewart at the time), agreed to be his leading lady in Boots for what turned out to be a happy working experience for them together.

they-died-with-their-boots-on-flynn-deha

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, rosebette said:

I wish Strawberry Blonde was on the list of films being shown.  I remember that French film retrospective where the speaker spoke of American films and said everything by Raoul Walsh was crap except for Strawberry Blonde.    I happen to disagree with that statement about Walsh, but that French film directors recognized this little gem is significant.

Be glad I wasn't with you, I would have SAID SOMETHING OUT LOUD. I mean, WHITE HEAT alone fer Chrissakes!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

hopefully these'll be ON DEMAND. I'd like to check out this one once more-

il_fullxfull.1141868890_r2rt.jpg

for years it was UNAVAILABLE, I remember mentioning it on the Boards here and within a year, TCM started showing it. (CLEARLY I AM SOLELY RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS- NO NEED TO THANK ME.)

I remember watching its TCM PREMIERE and THINKING it was distinctly  AHEAD OF ITS TIME with its tolerant attitude (MITCHELL LEISEN'S movies usually are), but also REALLY LONG. (LIKE 2 HOURS AND 20 MINUTES...?)

1946 was a really, really good year for WOMEN'S ROLES.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not have anything original to add about Olivia de Havilland that others haven't already stated quite eloquently here.  So I'll just say what so many have said already, she was a great lady, a wonderful actress, and certainly a movie legend.  She was not only beautiful, she had a sweet quality, manifested most obviously in her smile, which almost literally beamed.

I think it was Swithin who mentioned one of her first roles,  as Hermia inthe 1935 production of A Midsummer Night's Dream.  Many Hollywood actors, no matter how talented, can't pull off doing Shakespeare, but Olivia is believable and charming as one of the "mortals" who gets lost in the woods, in this delightful comedy. 

I also loved her performance in The Heiress, probably one of her most challenging roles, not least because she was playing "against type".  (As we all know, Olivia de Havilland was very beautiful-- in The Heiress she plays a shy, plain young woman.)  The character of Catherine Sloper is very complex, and Olivia's interpretation of her shows she understood all the nuances.

Just one more comment:  I'd love to see The Dark Mirror again. I saw it only once, many years ago, but never forgot it.  But I do remember that Olivia played a dual role in the film, and that can be difficult. I remember she was very good, as both characters she played.  I'd love to see it again.

Rest in peace, lovely lady.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

How many of you have read Every Frenchman Has One by Olivia de Havilland?   

I have a hardcover first edition I found at Edmund's Book Shop in Hollywood CA.   Nice, easy read.

I was never able to get any of my Olivia items signed by her since I never meet her.   I did take this book to Paris with me.    Yea,  like I was going to run into her at one of the those fabulous French open markets!     BUT I thought that if I did,,, and I didn't have the book with me,,, oh,,, the regrets.

Every Frenchman Has One by Olivia de Havilland

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...