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Life lessons from Star Trek.


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It's surprising that a mediocre episode could have so much to get out of it.  In addition to Spock's observation, the premise of A Taste of Armageddon, and Kirk's response to it have a lot to say about warfare, and also provides an opportunity for one of Kirk's best lines.  The people of Eminar Seven have been fighting a five-hundred year war with its neighbor Vendikar that has been sanitized into a computer calculated conflict, with each side killing off their own citizens according to calculated lists, thereby preserving the respective civilizations. The Enterprise is a victim of one of these attacks, and in order to save it, Kirk sets out to disrupt the entire system.  At one point the Eminar leader blasts Kirk for starting an inevitable course to real warfare and that there was no way to stop it.  Kirk responds:  Stop it?  I'm counting on it.

Kirk's idea is that bringing back the horrors of war will provide an incentive for ending it:

Setting aside the Prime Directive (they were ordered by Starfleet to jump in with both feet), and the fact that humans, at least, have never seemed to be deterred from war by its horrors, his rationale doesn't seem well thought out.  His reasoning goes that because people are unfamiliar with the effects of war, it has become tolerable.  Visiting its devastation will persuade people to seek peace.  But with peace, people will lose the memory and fear of war.  One can predict a continuous cycle of periodic war extending through time.  Much better would have been for someone to point out the system the two planets had in place was the way to make peace.  It was evidence the two planets could cooperate and abide by an agreement.  If a system can be used to conduct war, it can also be used to maintain peace.  It might be pointed out that the agreement was maintained by the threat of real attack.  But that could be said for any kind of agreement.

So it seems we don't get a life lesson here from Star Trek, directly at least.  But by indirection we might glean some wisdom.

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53 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

It's surprising that a mediocre episode could have so much to get out of it.  In addition to Spock's observation, the premise of A Taste of Armageddon, and Kirk's response to it have a lot to say about warfare, and also provides an opportunity for one of Kirk's best lines.  The people of Eminar Seven have been fighting a five-hundred year war with its neighbor Vendikar that has been sanitized into a computer calculated conflict, with each side killing off their own citizens according to calculated lists, thereby preserving the respective civilizations. The Enterprise is a victim of one of these attacks, and in order to save it, Kirk sets out to disrupt the entire system.  At one point the Eminar leader blasts Kirk for starting an inevitable course to real warfare and that there was no way to stop it.  Kirk responds:  Stop it?  I'm counting on it.

Setting aside the Prime Directive (they were ordered by Starfleet to jump in with both feet), and the fact that humans, at least, have never seemed to be deterred from war by its horrors, his rationale doesn't seem well thought out.  His reasoning goes that because people are unfamiliar with the effects of war, it has become tolerable.  Visiting its devastation will persuade people to seek peace.  But with peace, people will lose the memory and fear of war.  One can predict a continuous cycle of periodic war extending through time.  Much better would have been for someone to point out the system the two planets had in place was the way to make peace.  It was evidence the two planets could cooperate and abide by an agreement.  If a system can be used to conduct war, it can also be used to maintain peace.  It might be pointed out that the agreement was maintained by the threat of real attack.  But that could be said for any kind of agreement.

So it seems we don't get a life lesson here from Star Trek, directly at least.  But by indirection we might glean some wisdom.

The system that's set up might seem like a good plan for keeping a balance, but it seems that adopting a "you go your way and we'll go ours" system would work just as well without the need for killing a whole bunch of people with regularity.

However, that wouldn't satisfy the deeply embedded hate to which people always seem to become addicted. Animosities that go on for hundreds - even thousands - of years do so because people just can't give up their hate. They are addicted to it like a drug. It gives their lives meaning. Polarization is essential to the lives of the hateful.

And so, those factions had decided to keep the hate going but manage the casualty numbers by agreement.

Pretty obscene - but hey, that's people for ya.

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Actually, I don't know if anyone mentioned this, but the interracial kiss between Kirk and Uhuru was, in its own way, groundbreaking.  It is strange how many individuals frown on this.

On a funny note, beware of naming your dog (female) a name that is the same of a major Star Trek character.  A female Scottie thought she was being called every time someone mentioned Scotty on Star Trek.

I learned that tribbles are cute but multiply like bunnies.  And, it may have been preachy to some people, but the Horta episode of Star Trek says a great deal about respecting other life forms (and their babies).

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Actually, I don't know if anyone mentioned this, but the interracial kiss between Kirk and Uhuru was, in its own way, groundbreaking.  It is strange how many individuals frown on this.

On a funny note, beware of naming your dog (female) a name that is the same of a major Star Trek character.  A female Scottie thought she was being called every time someone mentioned Scotty on Star Trek.

I learned that tribbles are cute but multiply like bunnies.  And, it may have been preachy to some people, but the Horta episode of Star Trek says a great deal about respecting other life forms (and their babies).

The Klingons hated them so much they destroyed the Tribble homeworld.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSFgPmlOkj3OLp4WH5oFAf

 

The lesson, why destroy millions of other life forms because one hates a single "pest"?

The tribble may had some ecological importance to the ecosystem.

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34 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

Q sex is boring and not Omnipotent? What a shame.

She thought Q wanted to make OUR type of love. 

Star-Trek-Voyager-captain-janeway-Kate-M

 

The puppy scene was a riot.

Lady Q.....What are you doing with that dog?

then...

ebd296c48921c0dbd315995efff694e9.png

 

Lady Q....I'm not talking about the puppy!

:lol:

 

 

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4 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Actually, I don't know if anyone mentioned this, but the interracial kiss between Kirk and Uhuru was, in its own way, groundbreaking.  It is strange how many individuals frown on this.

That episode was banned in the UK until 1994. :o 

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4 hours ago, hamradio said:

The Klingons hated them so much they destroyed the Tribble homeworld.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSFgPmlOkj3OLp4WH5oFAf

 

The lesson, why destroy millions of other life forms because one hates a single "pest"?

The tribble may had some ecological importance to the ecosystem.

The Animated Series had Cyrano Jones now offering new "safe" spayed Tribbles.  However, even that turned out to have its troubles, as the creatures' food consumption couldn't be processed into reproducing:

LegitimateGreenFlatcoatretriever-poster.

(And while the TAS was ahead of its time in taking the TOS seriously four years before the 1979 movie brought the original out into the open...it's still the same animators of He-Man and The Archies.  🤦‍♂️)

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1 minute ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

This thread would be worthless without pathetic jokes.

and anything that makes me laugh couldn't really be pathetic.

silly, maybe.

but not pathetic.

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2 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

Get a load o' captain bringdown.

Seems the producers were right on about can there  be a Vulcan mindset...no concept of humor.

Maybe they ARE among us! :o

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSYeq0b5XxH_kYlpum4UoW

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

58668a745e52ce3981b741b7d6ef2527.jpg

They probably should have used George Takei for that scene. How prophetic that would be!

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14 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

But it wouldn't be funny.

Either way, only the most offended uptight person would complain about a harmless joke on the internet.

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