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Life lessons from Star Trek.


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1 minute ago, Sukhov said:

Either way, only the most offended uptight person would complain about a harmless joke on the internet.

I think there's at least twenty million of them.

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3 hours ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

This thread would be worthless without pathetic jokes.

Wouldn't want to get too non-PC and silly in the important Star Trek thread. ;) 

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9 minutes ago, Sukhov said:

Wouldn't want to get too non-PC and silly in the important Star Trek thread. ;) 

Well, it is about life lessons. I guess there's nothing silly about that.

Although, I often find life itself to be pretty silly.

God's gonna give me such a smack one day.

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Think I need to explain my joke since no one it seem to have gotten it.  I was punning the shock reaction from people over Kirk and Uhura kissing.  I showed something people would had been MORE shocked over during the 1960's hence Capt Picard's reaction.  Should had figured that out since my reply came after the Kirk and Uhura comments.

If you have to explain a joke, it's no longer funny......Jay Leno

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1 minute ago, hamradio said:

Think I need to explain my joke since no one it seem to have gotten it.  I was punning the shock reaction from people over Kirk and Uhura kissing.  I showed something people would had been MORE shocked over during the 1960's hence Capt Picard's reaction.  Should had figured that out since my reply came after the Kirk and Uhura comments.

 

If you have to explain a joke, it's no longer funny......Jay Leno

No, it's fine. Everyone understood. Some people just like to get offended.

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Think I need to explain my joke since no one it seem to have gotten it.  I was punning the shock reaction from people over Kirk and Uhura kissing.  I showed something people would had been MORE shocked over during the 1960's hence Capt Picard's reaction.  Should had figured that out since my reply came after the Kirk and Uhura comments.

I got it. Funny: very

Quote

If you have to explain a joke, it's no longer funny......Jay Leno

Except when the joke is being willfully not understood in order to make a political statement. A lot of that goes on around here.

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The Ultimate Computer is one of the best episodes.  Naturally, as it was written by D. C. Fontana, one of the best of the new wave of science fiction writers.  The Enterprise is fitted out with a computer that eliminates the necessity for almost the entire crew.  It's touted as a revolutionary breakthrough in technology, able to take the place of people, completely competent to deal with all exigencies- - -and, of course, you know things will go wrong.  There's a lot going on in the show.  It explores themes of hubris/humility, machines making people redundant, the dangers of surrendering control to technology.

One thing that's good about it is the reaction of Kirk to the threat it poses to his position.  Kirk expresses his uneasiness with taking away responsibility from people, responsibility needed for them to have a sense of self-respect and accomplishment.  The computer's inventor suggests that's prompted by the loss of prestige  and ceremony he has enjoyed as captain due to it.  He talks about this with McCoy privately.  I can't find a good clip of it, so here's the text:

MCCOY: Did you see the love light in Spock's eyes? The right computer finally came along. What's the matter, Jim?
KIRK: I think that thing is wrong, and I don't know why.
MCCOY: I think it's wrong, too, replacing men with mindless machines.
KIRK: I don't mean that. I'm getting a Red Alert right here. (the back of his head) That thing is dangerous. I feel. (hesitates) Only a fool would stand in the way of progress, if this is progress. You have my psychological profiles. Am I afraid of losing my job to that computer?
MCCOY: Jim, we've all seen the advances of mechanisation. After all, Daystrom did design the computers that run this ship.
KIRK: Under human control.
MCCOY: We're all sorry for the other guy when he loses his job to a machine. When it comes to your job, that's different. And it always will be different.
KIRK: Am I afraid of losing command to a computer? Daystrom's right. I can do a lot of other things. Am I afraid of losing the prestige and the power that goes with being a starship captain? Is that why I'm fighting it? Am I that petty?
MCCOY: Jim, if you have the awareness to ask yourself that question, you don't need me to answer it for you. Why don't you ask James T. Kirk? He's a pretty honest guy.

(sorry about the shading, it's from the place I copied it).

D. C. Fontana sure could write well.  You don't find dialog like that often, a person being so honest with themselves.  At least not in shows of that time.  Not only showing Kirk feeling threatened but surprised to discover in himself things he might not otherwise have recognized, or dismissed.  That is, the fact that part of his objection to the computer was indeed due to his enjoyment of the pomp and circumstance of being captain.

As it turns out, he was right about the computer.  But the wisdom is to know what is behind your reaction to things.  Why you feel the way you do.  If you know that, you can be in control of your actions.  Otherwise you will be a victim of your impulses.

The show also gives Kirk one of his best soliloquies.  It's not entirely relevant, but William Shatner comes through with one of his better deliveries:

 

 

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24 minutes ago, SadPanda said:

I got it. Funny: very

Except when the joke is being willfully not understood in order to make a political statement. A lot of that goes on around here.

Keep posting.  I'm over 130 posts.  My goal is 300+.

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7 hours ago, slaytonf said:

There's a lot going on in the show.  It explores themes of hubris/humility, machines making people redundant, the dangers of surrendering control to technology.

This was a real scare to many levels of "workers" throughout the 50's-80's. DESK SET '57 was about that.

Machines have eliminated many "mechanical" factory jobs while several jobs have simply morphed into "programmer" positions. The "surrendering of control to technology" has happened willingly. Human dependance on doing everything via "app" has been achieved, lured by the guise of convenience.  And the competitive non thinkers are driven to keep spending for the inane goal of having the "most updated versions"!

 

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Another cash-in for the Shat. 2005 TV movie.

Seriously, can you IMAGINE being defined forever by the job you had when you were 25?  TikiSoo: the greatest bed/bath saleslady forever! Thank you, I was very proud of my work. Remember the day some kid poured bubble bath in the hot tub display and it bubbled over? Wow changed my life. (I thought of this while waiting in line to get a Shatner autograph)

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4 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Seriously, can you IMAGINE being defined forever by the job you had when you were 25?

Hmm.  Now who else would fall into that category?

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One thing I learned through STAR TREK is----

Never pass up the chance to make out with a hot black woman.  ;)   Or.....ANY hot woman, regardless of skin tone! B)

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

One thing I learned through STAR TREK is----

Never pass up the chance to make out with a hot black woman.  ;)   Or.....ANY hot woman, regardless of skin tone! B)

Sepiatone

Gene Roddenberry: why does captain kirk get a new girl every week?

William Shatner: he uses up the old ones.

Every. Space. Babe. Ever: "Ladies of Kirk" Collects All of Captain ...

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Seriously, can you IMAGINE being defined forever by the job you had when you were 25? 

 

That is true of me.

I received my first important degree when I was twenty-five and had to immediately step away from university and research and go into practical application in order to fulfill obligation to those who made it possible for me to gain my education. My job has evolved to using far fewer pencils and virtually no graph paper as were required then and involves computers and telecommunication which were in the realm of science fiction then but my job title and the basic nature of the work are the same.

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Who would have thought Mr. Spock was a smoothie?  He's been paired with a few women, not on the scale of space cowboy Kirk, and mostly unrequited on one or the other side (mostly his).  But for all the randiness of the Enterprise captain, none of his encounters equaled the sheer erotic power of one of Mr. Spock's oh-so-decorous conversations with a Star Trek woman in The Cloud Minders.  One of the most gorgeous of all, and in one of the most distracting dresses of all, making it difficult while she is on screen to pay close attention to the show.  Even if it had been a good one, which it is not. 

The show is an exploration of American race relations by proxy, substituting a world where the elite live in a city floating in the clouds (consider the symbology), and the lowly workers live not on the surface of the planet, but under it.  The city dwellers live in an atmosphere of art and contemplation, the cave dwellers in a world of toil and toxic fumes.  Most notable thing about it?  Fred Williamson is in it.

When Kirk and Spock first arrive at the city, they meet the High Advisor, who introduces his daughter:

  • Plasus : Gentlemen, one of our planet's most incomparable works of art: my daughter Droxine. Captain James Kirk.

    Captain James T. Kirk : A pleasure, Madam.

    Droxine : Indeed yes, Captain.

    Plasus : And First Officer Spock.

    [Spock bows his head very slowly] 

    Droxine : I have never before met a Vulcan, sir.

    Mr. Spock : Nor I a work of art, Madam.

     

    Doesn't miss a beat.  I gotta remember that line. But the real moment comes later.  I could not find a good clip, so I include a video of the episode.  Unfortunately, the Droxine/Spock encounter was intercut with an action sequence involving Kirk and another woman.  Don't know why, maybe for dramatic contrast.  The action starts at 13 minutes in:

    Maybe when they watched the scene uninterrupted, it was too hot.  So what does Mr. Spock tell us about getting a woman just where she wants you?  First, engage a woman's sympathy by portraying yourself as stoically bearing up under your estrangement from the world of women (cf. Some Like it Hot 1959).  Then get her completely taken by suggesting qualities in her have the power to overcome those damaging barriers that have kept you distant from women.  Then let the love light shine.

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15 hours ago, SansFin said:

I received my first important degree when I was twenty-five (snipped) my job title and the basic nature of the work are the same.

You're one of the few achieving your career early. Many of us, especially those in the "arts" like actor/dancer/singer have to support ourselves with menial labor jobs until we get our big break.

Imagine Mick Jagger or Gwen Stefani known by their earliest job :

portrait-of-ice-cream-vendor-in-his-truc

..or Jimmy Stewart:

roads7.jpg

...or Brad Pitt:

chicken.jpg

William Shatner has a decent body of work, but it will always be eclipsed by his role as Captain Kirk- a job he had five decades ago.

That said, every artist hopes for that defining job of a lifetime. Shatner apparently has come to terms with his Captain Kirk fame as a vehicle to still earn money. 

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10 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Shatner apparently has come to terms with his Captain Kirk fame as a vehicle to still earn money. 

That's 'cause he's always been cool about it all.

He has worked at anything and everything in entertainment. He even enjoys the jokes about his acting.

Very cool dude.

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13 hours ago, SadPanda said:

That's 'cause he's always been cool about it all.

You obviously do not know much about Shatner's personal life.

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