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Not wishing to draw too much unwanted attention I did fail to notify that I went into the hospital for spinal fusion surgery and just returned from PT/OT rehab  yesterday afternoon.  All went well, glad to say, and my doctor informs me that wit this type of surgery it can take up to a year to fully recover.  Mybe shorter, depending on several factors.  So, it'll take some time for me to build the endurance of sitting at my PC and working on a keyboard,so be patient and hopefully I'll be back so to being the same Sepiatone some of you've come to be annoyed with.  ;) 

Whichever, I'm glad to be back and catch up with y'all.  

With much love and graditude

Sepiatone

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Welcome back and hope you have a good recovery.  Had a knee replacement 18 months ago and while much better, it is not what the MD nor the PT people predicted for recovery.  Be wary of PT people pushing you too hard, too fast - many of them are young ex-athletes.

Good luck!

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I beg you to remember than pain is your body's way of telling you to stop doing what you are doing. You will heal. Does it truly matter if it is in six months or nine months? Most people are so result-oriented that they ignore nature and so set back their recovery by trying to do more than their body can tolerate. Follow the instructions of the physical therapists but know when to tell them to go peddle their wares elsewhere. This is a time for rest and allowing your body to knit. Knitting is good. You can find many good instructional videos and knitting patterns on the Internet. Then when all this is done you will have found peace and have some nice little things to give as gifts.

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For me, the key was to not push it too hard early on, but also to do the home exercises.  These get boring after a while (about two days for me), but they are critical.  

I went to three different PT organizations over a period of three years (one before and two after surgery).  The private ones tended to push too hard or just get you to doing something and then wandering off for a while.  Ended up going to VA and had an excellent therapist who was used to working with old guys with bad body parts.  She did not stay with me all the time, but she kept her eye on me.  Also, the VA therapists did not get involved in conversations with each other as the private ones did.

Anyway, work at it, keep your therapists and MD informed of what is and is not working, but do not overdo it.

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

The Return.....

Immediately popped out to ....of the Living Dead.

'cause you're old and you were gone (apparently my humor has to be explained for some of us).

Welcome back.

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22 hours ago, TheCid said:

Welcome back and hope you have a good recovery.  Had a knee replacement 18 months ago and while much better, it is not what the MD nor the PT people predicted for recovery.  Be wary of PT people pushing you too hard, too fast - many of them are young ex-athletes.

Good luck!

Well, I did kid my PT that she must be one of those "no pain, no gain" mavens.  But I understood the why of it all.  And the OT seemed more interested in pushing "product" on me.  You know...grabbing devices, long shoehorns and all.  But they have come in handy so I don't have any real animosity towards them. 

And thanks again all, for the well-wishes.  Back atcha!  :)

Sepiatone

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21 hours ago, SadPanda said:

Immediately popped out to ....of the Living Dead.

I thought of Martin Guerre.

Perhaps Sepiatone can get a tablet and post from that.  Easy to do in bed, although auto-correct can be a pain.  :)

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52 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

(Maybe some knitting lessons are in order?  😊 )

I mentioned knitting because there is a school of thought that activities such as knitting are beneficial to healing because they distract from discomfort, cause the release of micro amounts of endorphins and make a person feel they are being productive at a time when they can not perform normal chores and activities.

It came to my mind also because knitting on a loom was once used as physical therapy for people with certain types of wrist injuries and I have a scarf which is fourteen feet long because my husband is such a person.

 

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At least you know being here on this forum won't cause you any pain or delayed recovery (at least in theory 😉) Please take care and remember to do your PT exercises faithfully.

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

Be careful you don't wind up like Isadora Duncan! :o

Isadora Duncan was the answer to a trivia question several years ago when I was at a trivia night.  I was the only person on my team who knew the answer.  When the announcer gave the correct answer at the end of the round.  Everyone looked at me like I just rotated my head ala Linda Blair in "The Exorcist"!

Congratulations on making it through your procedure, Sepiatone!  Good luck on your recovery...it can be a bear sometimes.  In our minds, we're still in our 30's and think we can do now what we could do then.  Of course, our bodies tell us otherwise.  Welcome back!

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Well, like I said elsewhere, the biggest disappointment is that the screws in my vertebrae are titanium and won't set off the alarms at the store's exits.  :D 

Sepiatone

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8 hours ago, SansFin said:

I mentioned knitting because there is a school of thought that activities such as knitting are beneficial to healing because they distract from discomfort, cause the release of micro amounts of endorphins and make a person feel they are being productive at a time when they can not perform normal chores and activities.

It came to my mind also because knitting on a loom was once used as physical therapy for people with certain types of wrist injuries and I have a scarf which is fourteen feet long because my husband is such a person.

 

And also there's the word play;  people sometimes refer to recovery from surgery as taking time to "knit together", their bones or whatever.  ( as I'm aware that you know.)

Anyway....Seriously, Sepia,  the knitting idea might be helpful !  

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4 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Well, like I said elsewhere, the biggest disappointment is that the screws in my vertebrae are titanium and won't set off the alarms at the store's exits.  :D 

Sepiatone

It is true also that they will not be ripped from your body and become shrapnel-of-death when you have an MRI. I know that does not seem to be a good trade-off but it is sadly true that one must act as a responsible adult at least once or twice a year.

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