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WHO KILLED GEORGE FLOYD?


JakeHolman
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46 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Perhaps he meant no one around here.

I any event, this is distracting from the fact that this is a completely RACIST thread!

I don't think he meant only those around here since he has made this point before with regards to defunding the police.     My main point was the media coverage;   by focusing too much on the extremist,   the media often ends up framing issues from those very minority positions.   

As for your last point;  sadly that is the case.    The good news is that a jury has ruled and at least this case is over.   There will be appeals but I don't see them going anywhere.

 

 

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Gingrich POV above is classic extremism and fear mongering.      What he is saying is that if police can't feel they have a right to murder suspects,,, well,  they will lose the ability to function.     This is likely the case with the 1% or so of police and part of police reform is find and fire these officers.    The remaining are professional enough to be able to handle themselves in a professional manner  (something the progressives and activists also need to understand). 

So who is  really knowing police departments under the bus,  here;  that would be idiot Newt.

Note one very interesting point Maddow mentioned was how much training the Chauvin had.     This is a concern and more research needs to occur as to why,  in that moment the training was ignored. 

I also wonder why the defense was willing to admit guilt,  but blame it all on mental illness.   Oh well,  they went for no conviction and failed. 

 

 

 

 

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The wingnuts have been saying we are on a slippery slope to something awful for the last fifty

years. I wouldn't waste a lot of time thinking about it. 

I watch the first few minutes of Greg Kelly most nights  just to get a couple of laughs.  He rarely

disappoints. Last night he played a clip of Trump's reaction just after Floyd was killed. Even Donny

was shocked and saddened at what happened. 

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Gingrich POV above is classic extremism and fear mongering.      What he is saying is that if police can't feel they have a right to murder suspects,,, well,  they will lose the ability to function.     This is likely the case with the 1% or so of police and part of police reform is find and fire these officers.    The remaining are professional enough to be able to handle themselves in a professional manner  (something the progressives and activists also need to understand). 

So who is  really knowing police departments under the bus,  here;  that would be idiot Newt.

Note one very interesting point Maddow mentioned was how much training the Chauvin had.     This is a concern and more research needs to occur as to why,  in that moment the training was ignored. 

I also wonder why the defense was willing to admit guilt,  but blame it all on mental illness.   Oh well,  they went for no conviction and failed. 

 

 

 

 

Courts are fed up with the mental illness / insanity excuse.  Should see the guy on Court Cam screaming  You'll not going to take my soul repeatedly.  Didn't work.

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15 minutes ago, hamradio said:

Courts are fed up with the mental illness / insanity excuse.  Should see the guy on Court Cam screaming  You'll not going to take my soul repeatedly.  Didn't work.

I fail to see how your reply is relevant since each case is decided on its own merit. 

Anyhow,  if the defense had come up with a temporary insanity \ PSDT type of defense,   as well as the defendant admitting what he did was wrong but due to his mental state,   the jury might have only convicted him of one of the lesser counts and the judge giving him a lesser sentence.     

Now the odds are high he will be given a long sentence being guilty on all 3 charges, as well as showing zero remorse.   

PS:  I realize this is Monday quarterbacking,  but the outcome for the defense couldn't have been worst for the defendant,   so any other defense strategy wouldn't have resulted in a worst outcome. 

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Exclusive: Americans overwhelmingly approve of Chauvin guilty verdict, USA TODAY/Ipsos snap poll finds

The survey found 71% of Americans agreed Chauvin was guilty, and most Americans surveyed followed at least some coverage of the three-week trial. When participants were identified by political affiliation, Democrats strongly concurred, at 85%, with Republicans at 55% and independents at 71%. The results were based on an online survey of 1,000 American adults from all states.

https://news.yahoo.com/ipsos-poll-nearly-half-americans-125549023.html

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40 minutes ago, JakeHolman said:

most Americans have no clue what's coming ... coming to a neighborhood near you and soon ...

You sound like my father's generation many of whom were frightened by the race riots of the late 1960s in Los Angeles, in Newark, in Asbury Park... fear is part of all our history.  Maybe there are other frightening experiences in our history that we have simply not experienced because of who we are or where we live.  We can always learn to conquer fear and learn to understand. 

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6 hours ago, JakeHolman said:

@ 5:04 very pertinent ...

 

 

Mark Simone used to be on NY1, a local television network owned by the Time Warner company, or at least it was, when I had Time Warner Cable. NY1 is a good network, with lots of local news and features, but it's not on my current cable company. Simone was the token conservative voice on occasion. 

But here's the thing. In the late 1990s, my office was in a building near the NY1 broadcast center. I once saw Mark Simone in the street. I was amazed at the size of his rear end! You don't get a sense of that when he's on television. It's enormous! 

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1 hour ago, Allhallowsday said:

You sound like my father's generation many of whom were frightened by the race riots of the late 1960s in Los Angeles, in Newark, in Asbury Park... fear is part of all our history.  Maybe there are other frightening experiences in our history that we have simply not experienced because of who we are or where we live.  We can always learn to conquer fear and learn to understand. 

 

During the George Floyd riots last year there were threats made by a few rioters / Antifa saying the suburbs were next....NOTHING manifested out of it.  No need for fear mongering just because somebody runs their mouth with empty threats.

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1 hour ago, JakeHolman said:

Victor Davis Hanson: Dems finds George Floyd 'useful' for larger agenda
Apr. 22, 2021 - 3:32 - Hoover Institute senior fellow discusses the impact of the Derek Chauvin verdict on the ego of the left.

https://video.foxnews.com/v/6249749312001#sp=show-clips

Republicans could also use this as a catalyst for change and racial equality and to make sure that George Floyd did not die in vain.  Instead they are bent on protecting an abhorrent out-of-touch racist way of life.

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21 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Perhaps he meant no one around here.

In any event, this is distracting from the fact that this is a completely RACIST thread!

I really meant nobody with the authority to do so if wished.  Not Biden, Harris or any of the democrat mayors of major metropolitan  cities.   I thought for sure that would be a given.  But I forgot I was online. :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

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11 hours ago, hamradio said:

 

During the George Floyd riots last year there were threats made by a few rioters / Antifa saying the suburbs were next....NOTHING manifested out of it.  No need for fear mongering just because somebody runs their mouth with empty threats.

"Antifa" is a word that actually refers to any person or group that is Anti Fascist.  Which likely may be why the right is against them.  ;)  There's no such thing as an Antifa army, armed to the teeth and threatening large scale violence against anybody.  Just another extreme right scare tactic.

Sepiatone

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On 4/21/2021 at 10:17 AM, JakeHolman said:

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Clint Eastwood, We Need You

Newt Gingrich, Newsweek April 21, 2021
 

Our streets are now so unsafe that it might be helpful to rewatch Clint Eastwood's Dirty Harry films. They can remind us of an earlier period in the 1960s and 1970s when crime was widespread, liberal judges were putting criminals back on the streets and the entire justice system was anti-cop and pro-criminal.

Read Full Article »

And we can go further back to the '50s, too, Jake, for your viewing pleasure.

Superman shakes hands with a cop | Adventures of superman, Superman, First  superman

For truth, justice, the American Way and, oh, yeh, to keep those coloreds in their place.

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A Troubled Rule of Law

Heather Mac Donald, City Journal April 22, 2021
 
EYE ON THE NEWS
A Troubled Rule of Law
The pervasive sense that cities would burn if Derek Chauvin were not convicted raises questions about whether the jury’s verdict was reached dispassionately.
Heather Mac Donald
April 21, 2021 Public safetyPolitics and lawThe Social Order
 

America’s cities did not burn last night. But the terrified preparations in Minneapolis and elsewhere in anticipation of the George Floyd verdict—the razor wire and barricades around government buildings, the activation of the National Guard, the declaration in Minnesota of a “peacetime emergency,” the fortified police presence, the curfews, the cancellation of school, the boarded up businesses—raise serious questions about the rule of law in the United States. Had the jury failed to convict Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin on all three counts of murder and manslaughter, the ensuing riots would likely have made the conflagrations of 2020 look like a Girl Scout campfire.

This likely outcome was evident long before Congresswoman Maxine Waters encouraged such violence over the weekend. Last year’s precedent, the ensuing 12 months of wildly inaccurate rhetoric about white supremacy, and the recent looting in Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, over a fatal police shooting made such rioting a virtual certainty. That inflammatory rhetoric poured forth from every institution in the country—from the presidency, Congress, corporations, law firms, banks, tech companies, academia, and the public school system. The mainstream media pounded home the narrative about unchanging black oppression. And even after the verdict, the White House (perhaps that name will be gone in another year) and the press have doubled down on the systemic racism conceit, despite the coordinated effort to convict among Minnesota’s public officials and the state’s most prestigious members of the private bar.

Going forward, it is an open question whether any police officer can receive a trial free from mob pressure, should he be prosecuted for use of lethal force.

The Chauvin jury may have pondered not just the destruction of American cities following any acquittal but its own safety. The Minneapolis Star-Tribune had published profiles of jury members minus their names on Monday, during closing arguments in the trial.

Contrary to the prosecution’s assertions, this was not an entirely open-and-shut case. The defense had at least arguably raised reasonable doubt about whether Floyd died of a Fentanyl overdose, aggravated by his preexisting heart disease and the stress of the arrest, and about Chauvin’s requisite intent to cause serious bodily harm. Floyd had been complaining about not being able to breathe before he was put face-down on the ground under Chauvin’s knee. The medical examiner had said that had Floyd been found dead at home in the same condition, the cause of death would have been identified as a drug overdose. The speed of the verdict and the absence of any questions to the judge may suggest that the jury had a broader set of issues on its mind than exclusively the evidence before it. Further complicating the process, as jury selection was underway, the city of Minneapolis had awarded civil damages to Floyd’s family.

In short, the criminal justice system did not behave like an institution shot through with anti-black bias.

Yet President Joe Biden took the occasion of the conviction to recycle his favorite “white supremacy” themes from his allegedly “unifying” inaugural speech and campaign rhetoric. Floyd’s murder “ripped the blinders off for the whole world to see the systemic racism . . . that is a stain our nation’s soul; the knee on the neck of justice for Black Americans; the profound fear and trauma, the pain, the exhaustion that Black and brown Americans experience every single day,” Biden said from the White House. The “summer of protest” had sent the message, according to Biden: “Enough. Enough. Enough of the senseless killings.”

Biden was not referring to the senseless killing of seven-year-old Jaslyn Adams, gunned down in a Chicago McDonald’s over the weekend. He was not referring to the four dozen black children who were killed last year in their beds, front porches, back porches, at barbecues and family birthday parties, and in their parents’ cars. He was not referring to the dozens of blacks killed every day in drive-by shootings—more than all white and Hispanic homicide victims combined—even though blacks are only 12 percent of the nation’s population. Those thousands of black deaths get no attention from the Black Lives Matter movement and its most fervent press acolytes because the homicide perpetrators are other blacks, not the police or whites.

Biden, rather, was referring to a phantom idea: that blacks have to “worry about whether their sons or daughters will come home after a grocery store run or just walking down the street or driving their car or playing in the park or just sleeping at home.” This would be an accurate statement if it referenced the terrorism of neighborhood gangs and their stupefyingly mindless retaliatory shootings. It is a falsehood, however, directed at the police. In 2020, the police fatally shot 18 allegedly unarmed blacks (unarmed being defined extremely loosely to include suspects grabbing an officer’s gun or fleeing in a car with a loaded pistol on the seat). That represents 0.2 percent of all blacks who died of homicide in 2020, and an infinitesimal percentage of the 40 million blacks in the U.S. If the police ended all fatal shootings tomorrow, it would have a negligible effect on the black death-by-homicide rate, which is 13 times higher than the white death-by-homicide rate for decedents between the ages of ten and 43.

Yet immediately after the verdict, Barack Obama repeated the same fiction, one that he in fact had pioneered during his presidency: that black Americans rightly “live in fear” that their next encounter with law enforcement will be their last. Minnesota Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan’s tweet that Minnesota is a place where it is not safe to be black (because of the police) is an equal betrayal of the truth.

The idea that blacks are frequently and disproportionately gunned down by the police is an optical illusion created by selective media coverage. If the press chose to ignore police shootings of blacks and focus exclusively on police shootings of whites (which are twice as numerous), Americans would think that we are living through an epidemic of racially biased police shootings of whites. A 2016 case from Dallas involving a white man named Tony Timpa almost exactly adumbrated the Floyd arrest and death, but no one has heard of Tony Timpa.

Last week, the Biden administration rescinded guidelines put out by former U.S. attorney general Jeff Sessions establishing commonsensical preconditions for when the Department of Justice can open a so-called pattern or practice investigation of police departments for systemic civil rights violations. Those investigations almost invariably result in costly, bureaucratically clotted consent decrees. As Harvard economist Roland Fryer has shown, police consent decrees have resulted in thousands of additional deaths when preceded by anti-police agitation. Now Biden’s attorney general, Merrick Garland, has announced the initiation of a pattern or practice investigation of the Minneapolis Police Department, signaling the start of increased federal control of police departments.

Last year, the United States saw the largest percentage increase in homicides in the nation’s recorded history, thanks to depolicing. The crime wave has continued unabated in 2021. It will worsen. The Minneapolis verdict will not change the poisonous narrative about a racist criminal-justice system. That narrative ensures that encounters between black suspects and the police will remain fraught. Black suspects will continue to resist arrest, increasing the chance that officers will escalate their use of force. If a suspect death ensues, more riots will follow.

The victims will initially be, as always, the thousands of law-abiding blacks in vulnerable urban neighborhoods who yearn for more police protection. But the power of riot ideology—the blackmailing of American institutions with the threat of black rage—is too advantageous to give up.

Americans should be deeply concerned about the future of the rule of law.

Heather Mac Donald is the Thomas W. Smith Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a contributing editor of City Journal, and the author of the bestsellers The War on Cops and The Diversity Delusion.

https://www.city-journal.org/chauvin-verdict-and-americas-troubled-rule-of-law

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