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What movie would you like to see remade?


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On the Today Show, they said they are remaking Planes, Trains, and Automobiles.  Why.

Now, if you could get a hold of Mr. Peabody's Way Back Machine (Loved Rocky and Bullwinkle), what film would like to see remade with some of the great actors and actresses no longer with us.  For example, on of the reasons I joined this forum is because of the debacle of a film based on a Cornell Woolrich novel.  Mrs. Winterbourne.  There were two previous versions, one starring Barbara Stanwyck.  Now, I would like to see a version of I Married a Dead Man as a noir film, but not sure whom I would like to see as the leads.  I would appreciate the suggestions.  If you need to check out the Stanwyck movie, it is called No Man of Her Own (also with John Lund).  I Married a Shadow is a foreign version.

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19 hours ago, Dargo said:

And speaking of "would you believe" and remakes...

That line of course reminds me of the classic sitcom 'Get Smart', of which I remembered a 2008 movie made of the exploits of inept secret agent Maxwell Smart which starred Steve Carell.

It did not receive glowing reviews at the time of its release, and the following review by Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle had me laughing out loud when I ran across it just now on this movie's wiki page:

 "It couldn't buy a laugh in a nitrous oxide factory with a fistful of clown noses."

Well,  would you believe the Maxwell Smart reference was intentional?

As for movies remade from TV shows,  the only one I can think of from a TV comedy that I liked was MAVERICK (if that counts as a comedy).  There were a few from TV dramas that I liked:  THE FUGITIVE,  THE UNTOUCHABLES.  a few of the STAR TREK movies,  parts of TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE.

 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Tulsa (1949). Watched this the other week and was struck by how contemporary and relevant much of it still was. At its heart is a conservationist, anti-big-oil, pro-indigenous, anti-colonialist narrative; but this inevitably gets sidelined by the dated stereotypes and cinematic conventions of the time. Even so, it was surprisingly forthright about these issues for the era, but there were understandably a lot of missed opportunities to explore this further, which the climate is ripe for now!

Susan Hayward is a powerhouse as always, but I would start by rewriting aspects of her character. First, cast an actual part-Native American actress in the role of "Cherokee." Refocus her motivation more around avenging her father's death against big oil, and less around (SPOILER) her implausibly rapid sellout of her ancestral land and being incongruously happily romanced by her father's murderer and mortal enemy. Those elements of the original screenplay could still come into play, but build up to them gradually to create a more nuanced conflict. Furthermore, maximize the role of "Jim Redbird" (more explicitly troped as Native American than Susan Hayward's "Cherokee"), the most active defender of indigenous land rights and sustainability (and obviously cast a real indigenous actor in the part), and minimize Cherokee's white love interests.

The whole thing would actually require very few rewrites. It's all there in the original script. Just recenter the story around Indigenous rights and environmentalism, with racially accurate casting, and you have a big hit for the era of "Standing Rock" and "Green New Deal." Could play well for primetime and/or web television as an extended series a la Blood and Oil, or as a more lavishly produced big-screen epic. Though, frankly, the Oscar-nominated special effects finale of the original (Susan Hayward's ash-smeared face in the midst of a burning oil field) would be hard to top, even with CGI!

Beyond that, like many classics fans, I'm wary of (but not totally averse to) remakes of old favorites...though what I would really like to see is the re-adaptation of some of my favorite literary works that have been oft-filmed but never properly done justice. For example, much as I love the classic versions of Frankenstein and Wuthering Heights, I'm still waiting for film versions that really capture the essence of the books.

Full disclosure. It's late at night and I'm not reading every single post thoroughly, so please forgive me if I'm retreading any previously discussed territory.

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The only reservation I'd have about remaking Tulsa (1949), a favorite movie of mine, is who would you get to replace Susan Hayward?  While everything else in the movie is ok, including Pedro Armandaríz, it's only value is her presence and performance.

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4 hours ago, slaytonf said:

The only reservation I'd have about remaking Tulsa (1949), a favorite movie of mine, is who would you get to replace Susan Hayward?  While everything else in the movie is ok, including Pedro Armandaríz, it's only value is her presence and performance.

That's a good point. Susan Hayward had superhuman star power!

Regrettably, I can't think of a Cherokee or other Native American actress who could replace her in the role, not because I don't believe qualified ones are out there, but because the industry hasn't elevated them to star status or they haven't had the opportunities for representation, even now. Somewhere out there there's a gorgeous, part-Cherokee (I want to say she was a quarter in the original film?) actress fighting her way through her program at NYU or Yale School of Drama, pounding pavement for off-broadway auditions; a teenager who is the diva of her high school play, and the toast of her rural Oklahoma town, and dreams of being "discovered" sipping soda at the local diner like Lana Turner; or a little girl playing make-believe in front of the television set, longing to see herself in the faces on the screen. Like Virginia Woolf's "mute and inglorious Jane Austen," there was a Native American superstar out there ready to play the hell out of Cherokee Lansing in 1949; we'll just never know who she was. And there's one out there now, too, but perhaps we still don't know who she is.

Certainly there are many fine, well-known and respected, professional working Native American actresses out there, who have appeared in creditable projects, but have not reached Hayward status, probably through no fault of their own. A cursory internet search will also reveal a plethora of very beautiful ones who have appeared in big-ticket films and TV shows, albeit typically in supporting roles. Yet, times they are a-changin' for representation, and I really believe we could see an Indigenous actress elevated to Susan Hayward level in the next generation.

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On 8/18/2020 at 6:05 PM, Stoopnagle said:

Well,  would you believe the Maxwell Smart reference was intentional?

As for movies remade from TV shows,  the only one I can think of from a TV comedy that I liked was MAVERICK (if that counts as a comedy).  There were a few from TV dramas that I liked:  THE FUGITIVE,  THE UNTOUCHABLES.  a few of the STAR TREK movies,  parts of TWILIGHT ZONE: THE MOVIE.

 

 

 

no reason for it either as Don Adams had already starred in several reprises starting with the nude bomb in 1980.

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5 hours ago, ClassicMovieholic said:

A cursory internet search will also reveal a plethora of very beautiful ones who have appeared in big-ticket films and TV shows, albeit typically in supporting roles. Yet, times they are a-changin' for representation, and I really believe we could see an Indigenous actress elevated to Susan Hayward level in the next generation.

I thought I had one to suggest, but it turns out she is German-American; (maybe the "American" is indigenous)

www.gstatic.com/tv/thumb/persons/446465/446465_...

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54 minutes ago, Thenryb said:

I thought I had one to suggest, but it turns out she is German-American; (maybe the "American" is indigenous)

I actually thought of her, too, because she's the highest profile Indigenous American actress I'm aware of, having appeared in big films like The New World and lead roles like Princess Ka'iulani. In this case, she is Indigenous South American, as I believe she is of half Native Peruvian Quechua ancestry.  Residing in Honolulu, myself, I know there was a mild controversy in Hawaii when she played Ka'iulani. Though Kilcher did grow up largely in the Islands, some Native Hawaiians understandably found the conflating of Indigenous Polynesian with Indigenous Peruvian (obviously very distinct cultures and peoples) to be problematic. But hey, at least they didn't cast Emma Stone or Scarlett Johansson, am I right? I think people were generally happy for any kind of mainstream representation of a history that is largely ignored on the continental United States; but the fact that Hawaiian actresses weren't considered over the more broadly famous and marketable Kilcher left a bitter taste for some.

But taking that legitimate grievance into account, I think it would be better to find an actress for Cherokee Lansing who was at least part Cherokee, or at least from a closer regional tribe.

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1 hour ago, ClassicMovieholic said:

But taking that legitimate grievance into account, I think it would be better to find an actress for Cherokee Lansing who was at least part Cherokee, or at least from a closer regional tribe.

Oh, probably. However, she did play Mary Thompson Fisher, a Chickasaw (one of the 5 civilized tribes along with the Cherokee) in a terrific movie called Te Ata made in 2016 on location, using mostly indigenous performers and on a very modest budget. If there have been complaints about her being cast in that movie, I have not heard them.

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6 hours ago, Thenryb said:

Oh, probably. However, she did play Mary Thompson Fisher, a Chickasaw (one of the 5 civilized tribes along with the Cherokee) in a terrific movie called Te Ata made in 2016 on location, using mostly indigenous performers and on a very modest budget. If there have been complaints about her being cast in that movie, I have not heard them.

I don't doubt it. She did also (convincingly I thought) portray Algonquian princess Pocahontas, at just age 14 in one of her breakout roles. To clarify, I have the utmost respect for Ms. Kilcher, who is certainly a capable actress with a lot of charisma, and a great beauty to boot, and has done valuable work for representation. I just would that there were more Indigenous actresses of her profile to highlight diversity among First Peoples, whom Hollywood and Western media seem content to typecast as a monolithic group with Ms. Kilcher as its default representative.

And I'm not of the opinion that seems to be trending in our "call-out-culture" times that actors can only portray experiences specific to their own cultural/racial/ethnic/gender/etc. identity. Surely part of the beauty of acting is inhabiting experiences other than one's own, or finding common humanity and empathizing across such disparities.  At the same time, I also think Western media would be harmed none by being held to a higher standard on Indigenous representation; and  surely there is room in our artistic life to appreciate complexity and nuance in Indigenous identity, elevate Indigenous actors of diverse backgrounds, and still allow for the artist's fluidity across narrowly defined barriers. Kilcher's success illustrates the viability of such a model, but that hers is virtually the only model we have to judge by is the problem...not Kilcher herself.

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A while back I had this thought.  What if they made a remake of Ferris Buller’s Day Off?  My friend and I talked about it and we thought Zak Efron would make a great Ferris Buller and Will Ferrell would make a great Principle Edward Rooney.  It’s a really funny movie too.  Isn’t it? With Matthew Broderick and another one of my very favorites too and Matthew Broderick is another really wonderful actor and another really great and really funny guy too.  Isn’t he and Matthew Broderick is another one of my very favorites too.  I really love him a whole lot.


 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

I posted this on the "Tyrone Power" thread in response to TomJH's comments on The Rains Came, but perhaps more appropriate for this thread:

 

   On 8/15/2018 at 11:31 AM,  TomJH said: 

The real star of The Rains Came, in my opinion, is the special effects, which still dazzle.

Power may look like a "copper Apollo" but he is hardly convincing in his role. I agree, however, that George Brent is very good.

This is one of those ones I would care to see remade with updated casting (while I love the original and totally agree that the special effects hold up marvelously!). It would be perfect for a British/Indian co-production. Could be a lavish big-screen epic, or alternatively might play well on the small screen in light of recent developments like Indian Summers and Beecham House. Could be released for English and Hindi markets and make big money globally. The late Sushant Rajput, who played a romantic hero in the similarly themed film Kedarnath, could have stepped into Power's part; a perfect "pale copper Apollo," but sadly no longer with us. Dev Patel could maybe do it now, though IMHO he's not quite up to Tyrone and Sushant levels of dreaminess, handsome as he is. At least he's bankable. Myrna Loy's jaded society lady, languishing in her couture amidst the monsoons, would make good Keira Knightley bait. You could bring the great Sharmila Tagore out of retirement to take on Ouspenskaya's role of the stately dowager; or recast as a younger but no-less regal widow with someone internationally marketable, say Priyanka Chopra or Archie Panjabi...more of an older sister figure to Power's character or even perhaps a romantic rival to Loy's (though I should say I vastly prefer the more faithful and less Hollywoodized former option!). Pepper the secondary leads and supporting cast with a who's-who of popular and hyper-competent British period drama staples, and of course "decolonize" the cast by bringing some Bollywood talent to more prominence in the script. I see it as a glamorous period piece a la Indian Summers or The Jewel in the Crown, but could also work with a postcolonial face-lift and still be mostly relevant.

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Might I suggest it is the direction by Clarence Brown that is the star of this motion picture.  His framing, his composition, his lighting.  Myrna Loy also does a good job.  One of her best performances.

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7 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Might I suggest it is the direction by Clarence Brown that is the star of this motion picture.  His framing, his composition, his lighting.  Myrna Loy also does a good job.  One of her best performances.

I agree that it is well-directed and handsomely photographed. And Loy is very good in it, definitely one of her best dramatic roles of the 1930s. Her final scene is one of the more moving and realistic such scenes of the studio era, when there was a risk that this kind of material could drift a bit too far toward overwrought melodrama. It is subtle and beautifully articulated, which according to Loy herself was thanks to the guidance of director Clarence Brown; so you make good points on both counts.

In any case, it's a magnificent production with many merits, among them the Oscar-winning special effects, Brown's artful direction, the atmposhperic scenes, and Loy's fine dramatic performance. If I'd like to see a remake, it's not to the detriment of the original film; It's that I think this story still has much to offer, and would be a good vehicle for a more diverse Anglo-Indian cast than was possible in an American production of the studio era. The remake that we do have, The Rains of Ranchipur (1955), hardly satisfies on this score either.

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On 8/7/2020 at 3:49 PM, Janet0312 said:

Nothing. Not a one. I hate remakes.  If it ain't broken, don't fix it.

I'm with you. Not a big fan of remakes. Having said that; I did like THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH with James Stewart and Doris Day. For years I didn't realize it had been done before.  Other than that I cannot think of another of my favorites I'd like to see remade. With the death of Gale Sayers this week, I was reminded of BRYAN"S SONG from 1971. It was re-made but the new version was not nearly as good as the original. 

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Well, I just did some research and learned that THE MALTESE FALCON with Bogart was a re-make. It's one of my favorites so I guess I cannot make a blanket statement about re-makes.

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23 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Well, I just did some research and learned that THE MALTESE FALCON with Bogart was a re-make. It's one of my favorites so I guess I cannot make a blanket statement about re-makes.

I could provide many other examples where the re-make was a better film (IMO),  then initial one released.     But these would be so called "remakes" released in the 30s,  40s,  or 50s.

I mention that because my gut tell me these  "I hate remakes" feelings from users at this forum (who I assume are fans of American studio-era films,,,  1929 - 1968 or so),  are driven by modern\recent remakes;  E.g.  a "remake" that was released after 1970.   Hey,  I generally don't like those remakes but not because they are remakes but because I don't enjoy the post 70s actors 1\100 as much as I do the actors from the studio-era.

 

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Well personally, I hated 1937's THE GOOD EARTH because of the casting. THE GOOD EARTH would have been so much better if Anna Mae Wong starred in it, Rainier made the charactor too weak to be likable. There were many strong Asian actors of the time that could have been less hammy than Paul Muni too, but they remain in obscurity from lack of casting.

The social mores of the story are definitely outdated, so a successful re-make would be tricky. (re: The WOMEN) But they successfully make modern movies of Jane Austen stories.

 

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8 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

The social mores of the story are definitely outdated, so a successful re-make would be tricky. (re: The WOMEN) But they successfully make modern movies of Jane Austen stories.

 

I don't see why it couldn't work just fine as an adaptation of Pearl S. Buck's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, and a period piece presenting China at a specific historical moment. Period pieces and adaptations of period literature remain popular and commercially viable (Jane Austen, to your point), even if they don't rack up the ticket sales and accolades they did in, say, the peak of the Merchant Ivory era. Could be a better one for a TV or web miniseries in today's market, but some of the recent ones have been quite good! And the time is ripe for an all-Asian cast movie/series for the Western market, what with the recent success of Crazy Rich Asians. Would that Anna May Wong herself were still around to star in it, and finally "get her day in court," so to speak.

Not dissimilar to my idea of a British/Indian co-production of The Rains Came with South Asian actors in the South Asian roles, which could work for big screen or TV/web, and be released in  both English and Hindi markets.

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