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What movie would you like to see remade?


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14 hours ago, ClassicMovieholic said:

I don't see why it couldn't work just fine as an adaptation of Pearl S. Buck's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, and a period piece presenting China at a specific historical moment. Period pieces and adaptations of period literature remain popular and commercially viable (Jane Austen, to your point), even if they don't rack up the ticket sales and accolades they did in, say, the peak of the Merchant Ivory era. Could be a better one for a TV or web miniseries in today's market, but some of the recent ones have been quite good! And the time is ripe for an all-Asian cast movie/series for the Western market, what with the recent success of Crazy Rich Asians. Would that Anna May Wong herself were still around to star in it, and finally "get her day in court," so to speak.

Not dissimilar to my idea of a British/Indian co-production of The Rains Came with South Asian actors in the South Asian roles, which could work for big screen or TV/web, and be released in  both English and Hindi markets.

Good points above, may I respond? 

The problem with the morals expressed in THE GOOD EARTH are so female-subservient, I just rolled my eyes in exasperation wondering why she didn't give him the boot. It's very hard to empathize with the charactor's self-induced suffering when we do not have to, even for traditional, cultural mores.

I imagine it was similar to THE WOMEN remake, although I haven't seen it yet. The story revolves around "pride" and honor especially, which was still around during my upbringing, so the original movie resonates for me. I figured a modern young woman would just be frustrated/angered by Mrs Stephen Haines acceptance of being her husband's appendage. (like I was angered by Rainer's charactor)

Wholeheartedly agree on your citing THE RAINS CAME.  Although no one could beat Maria Ospenskya

6a4764bb7fab426b341a89eab7862e2b.jpg

She looks EXACTLY like my Hungarian great grandmother ^^^

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On 9/27/2020 at 1:37 AM, TikiSoo said:

Good points above, may I respond? 

The problem with the morals expressed in THE GOOD EARTH are so female-subservient, I just rolled my eyes in exasperation wondering why she didn't give him the boot. It's very hard to empathize with the charactor's self-induced suffering when we do not have to, even for traditional, cultural mores.

I imagine it was similar to THE WOMEN remake, although I haven't seen it yet. The story revolves around "pride" and honor especially, which was still around during my upbringing, so the original movie resonates for me. I figured a modern young woman would just be frustrated/angered by Mrs Stephen Haines acceptance of being her husband's appendage. (like I was angered by Rainer's charactor)

Wholeheartedly agree on your citing THE RAINS CAME.  Although no one could beat Maria Ospenskya

Thank you for your response. Sorry that mine is so late. I see what you mean about The Good Earth, and must also admit I haven't seen it in some years. As for what you refer to, I think I chalked it up to this story being about (as you say) traditional, cultural mores specific to pre and inter-revolutionary Chinese peasants at  a specific moment in Chinese history. Of course, it should be acknowledged that though novelist Pearl S. Buck spent much of her life in China, she was writing from a Western woman's perspective looking in on that culture. I'm not familiar with the book, but no doubt there were many cultural misunderstandings and oversimplifications, evidently even more so in the movie by the nature of the medium and the cinematic conventions of the time. While I like many aspects of the film, I certainly make allowances for it being a product of its time.

As for the remake of The Women, I did not think it compared with the wit, style and incisive satire of either the original play or film by a long shot, but I didn't mind the seemingly anachronistic social mores you mention because this is a story about a very specific subset of women in New York high society in which (if tabloid news and Sex and the City are to be believed) women still regularly turn a blind eye to their husbands' adulteries for a comfortable spot of beachfront in the Hamptons or a charge card at Tiffany's. I think that the fact these women live in a world unrecognizable to most modern American women is part of the point; though again, didn't care for the remake and thought it was clumsy in many respects. If anything, I felt they should have gone with more of the original script (which I think is still relevant to the social circle it satirizes for the aforementioned reasons) instead of trying to both stay true to the mood and dialogue of the original while attempting (none too successfully, to your point) to update it to modern attitudes.

As to your greater point, I hear where you're coming from, and I think we agree that outdated values can still make compelling period drama without playing fast and loose with the source material or historical era. You rightly brought up the enduring popularity of Jane Austen; though I would argue this is a special case as Jane Austen (while the social mores around which her books are centered are very much of their time) was writing with more than a share of good-natured irony and satire about those same mores. This lightly satirical tone, together with the timelessly human concerns, failings, and desires of her characters, makes her work easily adaptable through a modern lens...not to mention hilarious in the hands of a screenwriter who really gets it.  But some contemporary period pieces (The Duchess and Mad Men come to mind), show how the adept writer can translate dated cultural attitudes around class, gender, etc. to the screen without either denigrating and belittling the complexity of the characters who were obliged to navigate them (as you express frustration regarding O-Lan's female subservience), or betraying historical truth to make it more palatable to modern viewers. This is all my very longwinded way of saying that I agree with you that The Good Earth could be readapted to the screen in the hands of a careful screenwriter and production team.

I concur that Madame Ospenskaya is incomparable, and that despite the racially insensitive casting that was the fashion of the time and not her fault at all, she does brilliantly with this part! She is every bit a QUEEN and more believable than I can imagine any other white actress of her generation having been with this material.

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On 10/2/2020 at 7:34 PM, hamradio said:

"Blue Denim"

Showing actors wearing the goofy ripped knee style.

landscape-1450106715-rippledjeans.jpg?re

 

:P

How is that any different from right now?  I went into an Old Navy recently and they still have pre-mutilated blue jean-wear.  The ones in your pic look like they were first masterfully cut with scissors, then gone over gently with wire brush wheel of a grinder.  The ones I saw looked like they spent more time under the wire brush wheel and no scissors.  Retailers are literally pushing garbage, and somebody somewhere is buying it.

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10 hours ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

I went into an Old Navy recently and they still have pre-mutilated blue jean-wear. 

My crummy work jeans are in style! Some even have PAINT! Try finding new looking, 100% cotton jeans anywhere, you're SOL.

 

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In The Women (original), I often end up wishing the ladies would just stay on that train and go off to have adventures. (Just bring along Little Mary. And they might have to ditch Peggy at some point.)

A new biography of Louis Bromfield (The Rains  Came) was released this Spring. Has anyone read it? Still on hold at my library.

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When I was a teenager many moons ago, you didn't pay megabucks for torn jeans/pants.  I hate the look.  The remake of The Women was dreadful:  really - a fat farm - that doesn't celebrate women.  Meg Ryan is not Norma Shearer and, in the original, the only outside shots were when they were on the farm.  Favorite line... Paulette Goddard, "and where I spit no grass grows."

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3 hours ago, Calamity said:

In The Women (original), I often end up wishing the ladies would just stay on that train and go off to have adventures. (Just bring along Little Mary. And they might have to ditch Peggy at some point.)

A new biography of Louis Bromfield (The Rains  Came) was released this Spring. Has anyone read it? Still on hold at my library.

I know what you mean. The "train to Reno" portion of the film is the most fun. I also find myself wishing they would just permanently settle and convert the divorcée ranch into an all-female (occasionally men-optional) commune and retreat. Peggy's a sweet kid, but you're right, the commune isn't really for her...she wouldn't be happy there. Miriam and the Countess on the other hand would keep things interesting!

I know almost nothing about Louis Bromfield. I only know of the novel by way of the film. I would be interested to learn more about him or read some of his work.

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2 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

The remake of The Women was dreadful:  really - a fat farm - that doesn't celebrate women.  Meg Ryan is not Norma Shearer and, in the original, the only outside shots were when they were on the farm.  Favorite line... Paulette Goddard, "and where I spit no grass grows."

Again, not a fan of the remake, but I don't know that the point of either the original or the remake was necessarily celebrating women. The tone of the original can be sharply (at times even brutally) critical. Internalized misogyny, yes, the absurd lengths that women will go to to meet societal beauty standards (it's right there in the opening scene of the original), and woman-on-woman viciousness are kind of part of the point. In the words of William Makepeace Thackeray, writing about a society an ocean away and a century before Clare Boothe Luce's, but not dissimilar in many respects, "...the greatest tyrants over women are women." (Vanity Fair).

If anything, as I began to suggest earlier, perhaps where the remake goes wrong is that it tries too hard to reinvent the story and make it empowering for women by modern standards, but is not successful at either fully committing to this attempt at a third-wave-feminist reclaiming, or honoring the eviscerating satire of the original. The original was empowering in its own way just by being fully, brutally, and unapologetically what it was. The remake couldn't decide what it wanted to be. The revival of the play with Cynthia Nixon which was broadcast on public television some years back, on the other hand, was fantastic!

I love that line, too!😆

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11 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

The remake of The Women was dreadful:  really - a fat farm - that doesn't celebrate women. 

 

9 hours ago, ClassicMovieholic said:

Again, not a fan of the remake, but I don't know that the point of either the original or the remake was necessarily celebrating women. The tone of the original can be sharply (at times even brutally) critical. Internalized misogyny, yes,...(snip) and woman-on-woman viciousness are kind of part of the point.

I haven’t seen the 2008 remake but did catch a bit of The Opposite Sex once. Bailed pretty quickly. Yee-esh. I think June Allyson sometimes gets unduly harsh criticism but things really went wrong for her in that movie.

I love the cast in the ‘39 film but do wince at some of the situations & dialogue. I think that was the intent though, as you say. Fortunately for the sisterhood there are many more Marys than Sylvias in real life but one may encounter the latter from time to time. (To paraphrase Rod Serling, “And the pity of it is, these things cannot be confined to The Women.”)

I think Robert O. stated he didn’t care for the fashion show section. Neither do I. 1) The animals in the cages,  and, 2) the outfit with a hand for clasp. That thing creeps me out. (I think it’s in this movie.) Maybe it’s a subliminal message that we’re actually watching a horror film.

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3 hours ago, Calamity said:

 

I haven’t seen the 2008 remake but did catch a bit of The Opposite Sex once. Bailed pretty quickly. Yee-esh. I think June Allyson sometimes gets unduly harsh criticism but things really went wrong for her in that movie.

I love the cast in the ‘39 film but do wince at some of the situations & dialogue. I think that was the intent though, as you say. Fortunately for the sisterhood there are many more Marys than Sylvias in real life but one may encounter the latter from time to time. (To paraphrase Rod Serling, “And the pity of it is, these things cannot be confined to The Women.”)

I think Robert O. stated he didn’t care for the fashion show section. Neither do I. 1) The animals in the cages,  and, 2) the outfit with a hand for clasp. That thing creeps me out. (I think it’s in this movie.) Maybe it’s a subliminal message that we’re actually watching a horror film.

I feel similarly about The Opposite Sex. The addition of men into the cast totally undermines the whole point. Leave it to the '50s to be like, "You know what that movie The Women needed...men." Although the 1939 film did have the tagline, "It's all about men!"😂 At least the 2008 remake stayed true to the (radical for the '30s) all-female cast concept. But as for the lackluster The Opposite Sex, Joan Collins was fun in a sort of trial run for her later career image, and there were some competent supporting actors.

I actually think the fashion show is really cool, but I understand others find the sudden switch to technicolor, and breaking of the fourth wall jarring. I think the hand-for-clasp outfit is super badass; very Schiaparelli meets Meret Oppenheim, French avant-garde, surrealist chic!  Here are some examples of what I mean: https://www.sartle.com/blog/post/surrealist-chic-goes-to-hollywood. I like that sort of borderline grotesque inventiveness in fashion, but I totally get why it's not everybody's cup of tea.☺️

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8 hours ago, Calamity said:

 

I haven’t seen the 2008 remake but did catch a bit of The Opposite Sex once. Bailed pretty quickly. Yee-esh. I think June Allyson sometimes gets unduly harsh criticism but things really went wrong for her in that movie.

I love the cast in the ‘39 film but do wince at some of the situations & dialogue. I think that was the intent though, as you say. Fortunately for the sisterhood there are many more Marys than Sylvias in real life but one may encounter the latter from time to time. (To paraphrase Rod Serling, “And the pity of it is, these things cannot be confined to The Women.”)

I think Robert O. stated he didn’t care for the fashion show section. Neither do I. 1) The animals in the cages,  and, 2) the outfit with a hand for clasp. That thing creeps me out. (I think it’s in this movie.) Maybe it’s a subliminal message that we’re actually watching a horror film.

This is the oddest fashion choice from The Women, IMO

6f85e0bf6bcd366ffdd0e598ee6dccab.jpg

As far as creepy hand clasps go, here's one from The Man Who Came to Dinner.   Somehow this outfit slipped by the Hays Office.

MV5BMzIzN2ViYzMtMzIzZi00OGMxLThmYjEtZWRk

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17 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

This is the oddest fashion choice from The Women, IMO

6f85e0bf6bcd366ffdd0e598ee6dccab.jpg

As far as creepy hand clasps go, here's one from The Man Who Came to Dinner.   Somehow this outfit slipped by the Hays Office.

MV5BMzIzN2ViYzMtMzIzZi00OGMxLThmYjEtZWRk

Again, I think they're both super cool! No accounting for my own taste, I suppose.😂

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  • 2 weeks later...

how about a remake of mario bava's Baron Blood.

in the 1972 movie bava gives us joseph cotten as medieval zealot sadist Baron Otto Von Kleist.

the white nationalists could really use this fella.

"my dear, do you really think you can destroy me with...a trinket!"

Groovy Doom: Baron Blood (1972)

Baron Blood (1972) - ALL HORRORPin on Hyper Schlock Grinder

 

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