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Actually, If I were to choose a Bob Dylan tune for this( and "One Too Many Mornings is a Dylan tune) it would be---

I like Jerry Jeff's take on it but for Dylan Tangled Up In Blue is quite Noir-ish  another Bob Dylan audio Noir is below

 

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On 8/9/2020 at 8:33 AM, TikiSoo said:

25 years ago the band Portishead came out with their first album DUMMY. This first track sets the mood for their uniquely crafted songs to follow:

The band was interviewed extensively for that 25 year milestone and the  members revealed the mysterious sounding songs were crafted as a soundtrack for a noir spy thriller.

I was first attracted to Portishead because I'm a Theremin player. Very disappointing to see they "cheat" using a keyboard. I understand... it's nearly impossible to hit all the notes exactly on a Theremin, especially during a performance with others nearby.

Odd time signature makes it somewhat unnerving/disorienting.


Since the 1990s, various touring pop stars who like to be seen playing a grand piano on stage bring one with the keyboard and action (all the hammers) removed and left behind.  That all slides out in one piece just like a drawer, and a then a high end digital keyboard is pushed into its place, with the back of it sitting underneath the strings where the piano hammers would be.  They use keyboards this way for consistency.  Also a digital keyboard doesn't need to be tuned each time it is moved.  The piano otherwise wouldn't necessarily need to be modified and can often be returned to normal configuration just by sliding out the digital keyboard and sliding the mechanical action back in.  This is a simple mod - sometimes just one screw on each side of the action holds it in place.  Piano movers and piano tuners remove them all the time.

Cool clip BTW

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How about 6 Femme Fatals? "Cell Block Tango" from the musical CHICAGO (sorry, I couldn't turn the subtitles off.)

 

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On 8/8/2020 at 2:10 PM, misswonderly3 said:

lav,  I almost chose "One For My Baby" for the first song on this thread.  For the same reasons you cite.  I absolutely love "One For My Baby", the tinkling piano in the background, the 3 o'clock in the morning feeling, the way Frank sings it....especially the bit where he sings, "...    'til  it's talked away...". his voice descends into almost a whisper, so sad and intimate.  A great song, and yes, very noirish.

Interestingly, both "Angel Eyes" and "One For My Baby" appear on one of Sinatra's best albums,  "Frank Sinatra sings for Only the Lonely".

I was just thinking of Road House where Ida Lupino sings that song. Now that's noir, baby!

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12 hours ago, EricJ said:

But not to say that Trevor Horn's The Art of Noise couldn't put their own distinct 80's spin on the former:

(Oh, you younger kids don't know what we had, back in the days of mainstream pop, and an MTV that actually showed music.)

Oh, gosh! Remember when MTV was new?

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21 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

 

Wonderful! Gee, I love that song. Huh... I love Dean too. I used to love when he would come out from back stage and fall onto his piano. Oh, variety shows, where have you gone?

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23 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Frankie and Johnny

One Way or Another (whatever Blondie song's name is)

Every Breath You Take (Sting admitted it sounds like a stalker song)

Some of the music from Porgy and Bess

So many other songs (and it depends on how it is sung)

Oh, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes!

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On 8/8/2020 at 4:43 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

 

Thanks, james, for that interesting version of "Laura".  It's good, but it's also kind of up-tempo and almost cheerful-sounding.  For my money,  I'd have to go with, once again, Frank Sinatra.  And of course, Gordon Jenkins, who should get full credit for his moody arrangement of the song.   To me, this version of "Laura" actually goes beyond the "Laura" in the film;  the girl in the song seems much more mysterious and unattainable, a ghost from the singer's past.  (Yes, I know the Laura of the film is in a way a "ghost", or so her housekeeper thought at first, but I'm talking about a much stranger "Laura",  a dream, a memory from the past.  "But she's only a dream...") 

Sinatra and arranger Jenkins just nail the melancholy, mysterious, ineffable quality of the song. 

There was a youtube version of Sinatra's "Laura" I could have picked, but it was accompanied by clips from the film.  I feel that the "Laura" in Sinatra's rendition of the song is not the Gene Tierney character,  but someone quite different.

Please don't mistake me, I love the film Laura, the story, the atmosphere, and the entire cast, including Gene Tierney.  It's just that the song as Sinatra and Gordon Jenkins interpret it is something different, and to be honest,  more "noirish" feeling than the version in the film.

 

 

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Street Scene is used in the noir film I Wake Up Screaming.

I posted this the other day.  As for Bruce S., Listen to the lyrics of one of his most famous songs, Born to Run.

Street Scene is used by 20th Century Fox for a lot of their crime \ noir films;   E.g. Cry of the City (1948): The musical score of the film is Alfred Newman's Street Scene, which had debuted in a 1931 movie of the same name and became iconic in big-city gangster pictures produced during that era.

 

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40 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Can't name a particular album, but Miles Davis and Jazz are perfect for noir.

There were many songs that were sung by characters in Noir Movies or they were used as background movies.

Great elevator music (wink \ wink).

JEANNE MOREAU - French New Wave Actor

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