Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

The Hunchback of Notre Dame


Recommended Posts

Can anyone explain why The Hunchback of Notre Dame is labeled as “Horror” in TCM’s Summer Under the Stars schedule for today, August 17th?  Surely this must be a mistake!  Shouldn’t it be classified as “Drama”?  After all, it’s great literature, a Victor Hugo classic.  Quasimodo might look horrible, but he’s anything but a malevolent character.  Thoughts?

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Andrea Kosko said:

Can anyone explain why The Hunchback of Notre Dame is labeled as “Horror” in TCM’s Summer Under the Stars schedule for today, August 17th?  Surely this must be a mistake!  Shouldn’t it be classified as “Drama”?  After all, it’s great literature, a Victor Hugo classic.  Quasimodo might look horrible, but he’s anything but a malevolent character.  Thoughts?

I dunno. I'm stumped here too!

(...saaaay,  maybe it's the same sort'a thing as why Adam Sandler movies are listed as "comedies"?!)

  • Haha 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Andrea Kosko said:

Can anyone explain why The Hunchback of Notre Dame is labeled as “Horror” in TCM’s Summer Under the Stars schedule for today, August 17th?  Surely this must be a mistake!  Shouldn’t it be classified as “Drama”?  After all, it’s great literature, a Victor Hugo classic.  Quasimodo might look horrible, but he’s anything but a malevolent character.  Thoughts?

The only horror now  Quasimodo is homeless. Sad.

 

shutterstock_1370953418.jpg

;)

  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Possibly Quasimodo, associated with the gypsy girl with whom he is in love but can never have, is classified in the minds of many as yet another of the Beauty and the Beast stories. That, combined with the hunchback's unfortunate appearance, is probably enough for the tale to be classified as "horror" in the minds of many. Having said that, I can understand why someone might question the classification.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1923 Hunchback is considered one of the Universal Monsters. I guess it's considered horror just because he's an ugly guy who is seen as a bit malevolent and creepy at first. 

https://universalmonsters.fandom.com/wiki/Quasimodo

I mean, Frankenstein and his bride aren't intentionally malevolent either but they are considered monsters usually as well? I don't see a with Hunchback being described as a horror film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

While the character of Quasimodo is horrific and grotesque, he does not cut a swath of devastation and death through a group or area like other horror movie monsters.  It is more properly a drama, or even adventure.  I don't know if there is a literature category for movies.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sukhov said:

Notre Dame cathedral burned down last year. That is what he is mentioning.

My wife and I were in Paris last October and walked past its reconstruction while venturing down the Seine. Quite an operation going on there.

(...okay, have I name/place dropped enough here?!)  ;)

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Andrea Kosko said:

Can anyone explain why The Hunchback of Notre Dame is labeled as “Horror” in TCM’s Summer Under the Stars schedule for today, August 17th?  Surely this must be a mistake!  Shouldn’t it be classified as “Drama”?

Wait for Cigarjoe to show up and tell us why it should really be classified as a noir.

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing no one has mentioned is that Quasimodo is a cold blooded killer in this film. He tosses heavy objects on the crowd below killing several of them. He also throws another character from the tower. And he  also pours molten lead on the people below, killing what seems many more. I guess that is why it is considered horror. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

One thing no one has mentioned is that Quasimodo is a cold blooded killer in this film. He tosses heavy objects on the crowd below killing several of them. He also throws another character from the tower. And he  also pours molten lead on the people below, killing what seems many more. I guess that is why it is considered horror. 

Nah, he was just exercising his rights under the "castle doctrine."

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Re:  Notre Dame, I remember seeing it in 1999.  What an amazing structure, and they were doing some renovations at the time.

One of the things that always gets me about the film versions of Hugo's novel (and I've read the unabridged version) is why they end it with sanctuary (and add a love story).

It may have got put in the horror genre because they think gothic films belong under horror.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

One thing no one has mentioned is that Quasimodo is a cold blooded killer in this film. He tosses heavy objects on the crowd below killing several of them. He also throws another character from the tower. And he  also pours molten lead on the people below, killing what seems many more. I guess that is why it is considered horror. 

Quasimodo, if you'll recall, was seeing the cathedral as being under attack and/or possibly a lynch mob after his heart throb Esmeralda, and did all that in defense of both the  church and the girl.  Cold blooded killing wasn't part of his normal pattern of behavior.  The person he throws from the tower was his presumed "benefactor"  Frollo, whom did treat Quasimodo often cruelly and abusive, and who was also threatening the safety of Esmeralda. Remember...

Unlike in this movie, Esmeralda does get hanged in the novel. 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't want to spoil the ending.  But, the good news is that, in the book, the goat survives!  Hugo was a great novelist, and, like many novels (Les Mis, for example), they cut a great deal out in order to make the movie (and sometimes add romantic elements that don't belong there:  for example, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde).

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

One thing no one has mentioned is that Quasimodo is a cold blooded killer in this film. He tosses heavy objects on the crowd below killing several of them. He also throws another character from the tower. And he  also pours molten lead on the people below, killing what seems many more. I guess that is why it is considered horror. 

those are my favorite parts when he pours molten lead and chucks down heavy objects on those cathedral-disrespecting scalawags.

:lol:

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

Quasimodo himself admits he tried to carry Esmerelda away.  His behavior and appearance are "horrific".  The Hunchback has long been thought of as a "horrific" character... of course, great Horror has pathos, like the film FRANKENSTEIN (1931). 
 

Quasimodo attempts to abduct Esmerelda because Frollo orders him to do so.  Quasimodo isn’t evil .... his impulses are good.  Yes, his appearance is horrific, but we soon learn he has a noble, gentle spirit.  This is drama, not horror.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Sukhov said:

The 1923 Hunchback is considered one of the Universal Monsters. I guess it's considered horror just because he's an ugly guy who is seen as a bit malevolent and creepy at first. 

https://universalmonsters.fandom.com/wiki/Quasimodo

I mean, Frankenstein and his bride aren't intentionally malevolent either but they are considered monsters usually as well? I don't see a with Hunchback being described as a horror film.

I get that Mr. & Mrs. Frankenstein aren’t intentionally malevolent .... but they aren’t natural, either.  They’re creations of the Doctor:  unnaturally formed by stitching dead body parts together and animating them with electricity.  That’s the evil, malevolent force:  Man tries to be God.  Quasimodo, pitifully deformed and disabled as he may be, is at least part of the natural world.  And we soon learn what a noble, courageous spirit he has.  Just my two cents:  this is a drama, not a horror film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...