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Actors you do not like


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24 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

 

Interesting, because both of these men are more known for their work as directors than as actors.  And as directors, they're both outstanding.

I know. I don't know what it is about them, but I can;t stomach them at all. 

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Whoa !  These newbies like to come on strong !  I'll pass on most of the people you dis,  but can't stay quiet about Frank Sinatra or James Stewart.  Frank, "punkish"?  What the hell does that even mean?    As for James Stewart, he was only like that ( "aw shucks")  in his early films.  He developed into a very fine actor, one of the best of Hollywood's greats.

Check him out in any of his work with Hitchcock or Anthony Mann-- there's no "aw shucks" persona, I assure you.

(Also, I love Jean Arthur,  and one of the reasons why is her voice. However, since I know there are some who don't like her unusual voice, I won't argue that one.)

I love Jean Arthur too.  Her voice is so unique and I find it very charming.  

It's one thing to dislike a performer for whatever reason; but I'm finding a lot of these reasons to be somewhat absurd.  I get that sometimes a person just doesn't click with someone, like I do not see what the big deal is about Spencer Tracy, but it's only because I have yet to watch a performance that really wowed me.  I've found lesser known actors, like Robert Ryan for example, who were more impressive than Tracy.  Perhaps I just haven't seen the right film.

I don't mind Sinatra or Stewart.  I also don't think Jane Russell looks like trailer trash (??).  She's gorgeous in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.  I also loved her in His Kind of Woman. And I don't know how you can decide someone is a smug prick based on their performances onscreen. That might just be the type of persona they excel at.  Zachary Scott always plays a sleaze in his films, but I'm sure he was perfectly fine in real life. 

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

Do you need to say why what?  Why you don't like her?  Of course you do.  Marilyn is completely charming and funny and likable.  If you do not like her, fair enough, but I think you do need to say why.

I just can't get into her breathy way of talking. She comes off as fake to me. I think she had the potential to be a better actress, but her modeling career took care of that. If she can't twist around in a tight dress, why give the part to Marilyn Monroe? Niagara and Don't Bother to Knock may be an exception.

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1 minute ago, Rudy's Girl said:

I just can't get into her breathy way of talking. She comes off as fake to me. I think she had the potential to be a better actress, but her modeling career took care of that. If she can't twist around in a tight dress, why give the part to Marilyn Monroe? Niagara and Don't Bother to Knock may be an exception.

She affected the breathy voice, so yes that was fake, but it was part of her persona.  I can see if the persona I suppose was a turn-off.  While she uses her breathy voice somewhat in Some Like it Hot, it's not quite to the extreme as it is in her earlier films, and she does a fantastic rendition of "I'm Through with Love" at the end of the film.

I also love her performance of "Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend" in Gentleman Prefer Blondes.

I believe toward the end of her life (sadly), Marilyn was letting go of the breathy voice.  If I remember right, she speaks with her normal voice in The Misfits. The breathy voice wouldn't have worked with the character.

I love Marilyn Monroe.  I think she has such a unique screen presence and she's so charming.  I love the way she sings with the vibrato added.  

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5 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

She's actually quite a good actress.  Try not to think about "Murder She Wrote" when you watch her movies.  She has a small but important role in Gaslight, a very sympathetic one in  The Dark at the Top of the Stairs,  and she's hilarious in Court Jester.

I've never heard of anyone disliking Jessica Fletcher! But to each his (or her) own I guess.  

I  love Angela Lansbury and while we don't see her in the film, she is perfectly charming and soothing as Mrs. Potts in Beauty and the Beast. Who doesn't feel better after hearing her sing the title track "Beauty and the Beast" ?

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

With that said, even if Mickey Rooney is in a film it won't keep my from watching the film.  Though, I haven't seen any of the Andy Hardy movies.  If I did watch one, it'd probably be for one of his leading ladies, rather than for him.  I do own a Mickey Rooney/Judy Garland box set, but that was only purchased for Judy. 

I just can't believe that Rooney was such a lady killer.  There is nothing appealing about him at all.  

I guess we all have different tastes. I love Mickey. He was perfect as the jockey in National Velvet, which I love. I also like him in Boys Town and especially in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He's a versatile performer.

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I'm not crazy about Spencer Tracy either, and Joan Crawford is sort of a special acquired taste.  But Edward G.  ?  What's not to like?  Such a good actor, and in so many great movies.

I like Joan Crawford when she moved to Warner Brothers through to What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?  She made a lot of great "women in peril" movies.  My particular favorites are: Mildred Pierce, The Damned Don't Cry, Flamingo Road, and Autumn Leaves.  She's also in a lot of great noir like Sudden Fear.   I am not a fan of hers during her ingenue years.

Edward G Robinson is awesome.  He should have won an Oscar for Double Indemnity

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Just now, Rudy's Girl said:

I guess we all have different tastes. I love Mickey. He was perfect as the jockey in National Velvet, which I love. I also like him in Boys Town and especially in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He's a versatile performer.

I think Mickey is better when he's just in the movie and not trying to be MICKEY ROONEY all the time.  I don't recall disliking him that much in National Velvet, so perhaps in that film he kept himself reigned in. 

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8 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Tough crowd here. For the somewhat Allen-phobic there are his earlier funny movies like Take the Money and Run

and Sleeper. That's before the Woodman began his transformation into an American version of Ingmar Bergman,

which didn't really take. 

I like Allen. I like that he pays homages to people and styles of bygone eras.

But, I have not and will not give him one penny of my money as long as he refuses to cast people in him films who look like me. The past is one thing but, this is 2020, there is no excuse now for not being diverse in casting.

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6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Wow, that's quite a list.  But at least you try to 'splain why you dislike these actors.  Sort of....a lot of your explanations seem to consist of saying "there's just something about them I don't like... " not exactly specific.  I have to say, the only one on your list who I also dislike is Spencer Tracy.  There's been some talk on this thread  of smug actors ,  and Spencer Tracy always struck me as a bit smug. "That said",  he's been in some good films, and has his good points  (sense of humour, for one.)

I won't go over all 8 of the disliked ones, but I'll just  defend a few:  I can separate the art from the artist.  I did not know that Sean Connery was a "wife beater", and I guess ignorance is bliss, because although Mr. Connery is not a particular favourite of mine, I can certainly watch and enjoy his movies.  (or if I don't, it's not because of anything he's done in his personal life.)

Fred MacMurray's been in a lot of good films, and maybe even one or two great ones.  He's a good actor.   (just to name two:  Double Indemnity, The Cain Mutiny )

Ditto for Kirk Douglas.  In fact, Kirk was in many great movies.  He deserves his legendary status.  ( Out of the Past,   Paths of Glory )

Ditto again for Burt Lancaster.  I love Burt !  An incredibly handsome man who was also very talented.  He's been in many great films, including several in my favourite movie genre, film noir.  (Criss CrossFrom Here to Eternity,   so many more...)

Speaking of From Here to Eternity,  another one on your list starred in that film:  Deborah Kerr.  I could be wrong, so sorry if I am, but I do often have the impression that Americans automatically think anyone with a British accent is "snobbish".  Deborah Kerr is a fine actress and has worked in many excellent films.  Including From Here to Eternity, but also, just to name a couple where she's anything but snooty,  I See a Dark Stranger(funny, suspenseful, a really delightful film that rarely gets shown), and her role as the very messed up governess in The Innocents.

Tee hee.  Well, I don't actually hate them or anything.  I'm just not a fan of them and can't exactly see what others might see in them.  I guess I could say for the ones that I said "there's just something about them that I don't like", I should have put down that I don't find them attractive.  It seemed a little insulting to have put that down though, lol.  🙂

I can usually separate what the actor has done in his personal life from themselves as an artist, but wife beating is something that I just can't look past.  I grew up in a violent home and just knowing that they would do such a thing is something that I cannot ignore.

I really liked Fred MacMurray in "The Happiest Millionaire".  I thought he was perfect for the role.  🙂  I just didn't find him attractive in romantic roles.   I don't think I've seen enough of his movies though.

Same with Deborah Kerr.  I've only seen a few of her movies.  (I LOVED her in "The King and I" though).  She just seemed a bit stiff or wooden when it came to romances.  (Though maybe I haven't seen the right movies).  I LOVE British accents though and never thought a person "snobbish" for speaking correctly.  If anything, it's probably nails-on-a-chalkboard for a Brit to listen to an American accent, lol.  It's a shame where in even this day in age that any actor with an accent is automatically cast as a British "snob" or "Latin Lover", or "Russian Spy", etc.

 

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2 hours ago, GGGGerald said:

I like Allen. I like that he pays homages to people and styles of bygone eras.

But, I have not and will not give him one penny of my money as long as he refuses to cast people in him films who look like me. The past is one thing but, this is 2020, there is no excuse now for not being diverse in casting.

I agree, GGGerald.  It's really noticable how few Black people Allen has in his films, it's always kind of bothered me a little.

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

First here MissW, I've always LOVED Deborah Kerr, and so secondly, yes, I think you WERE wrong with your above broad brush comment, "Americans automatically think anyone with a British accent is "snobbish", AND even though I DO think as you can probably imagine that their continued use of the superfluous 'u' and their arguments and rationales for its continued use COULD often rightly be construed in that way..."snobbish"!  LOL  ;) 

And thirdly, and because you brought up the lovely Miss Kerr and her performance in  From Here to Eternity, I thought you might be interested in watching the following. It's her own recollections as to how she got the part in that film:

 

I love this clip!  Deborah's expression as Burt walks up at 1:53, is exactly how I look when he comes on screen.

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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I just can't believe that Rooney was such a lady killer.  There is nothing appealing about him at all.  

Intelligence & talent will always be appealing-Rooney had a bucketful of both. Just goes to show what we see on the screen is NOT the person we might meet in real life. I bet Rooney was intense & charming when smitten.

9 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Joan's persona doesn't seem like she would be the type to hook up with a man while she's married, whereas prim and proper Deborah Kerr manages to seem like the type who would.  I can't explain that either. 

It's called ACTING. I'd venture to guess that Deborah Kerr is a more complex actress than Crawford.

Janet- if you don't like Welles you should see CITIZEN KANE, he's not very likable in it.

MissWonderly said: It's really noticable how few Black people Allen has in his films, it's always kind of bothered me a little.

Mmm, maybe because there's so few people of color in NYC? 😉

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14 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Ok, I agree that Farley can be a bit wooden.  But have you seen Strangers on a Train?  It's such a fun movie, and Farley's woodenness kind of suits the character.

I like Strangers on a Train and saw it a few times. It's fun and exciting to watch. The fun and excitement, Robert Walker, and Ruth Roman are the reasons for repeat viewings, not Farley. Farley is clearly the weakest of the three, and it shows.

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I'm not a big fan of Barbara Stanwyck. I know she' s beloved, and I love many of her films. But I find her style forced and one-note. I think she had the good fortune to spend much of her career at Paramount, where there wasn't as much competition for leading dramatic actress as there was at Warner's or MGM, so she got some good roles.

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Dargo, sorry,  I did not recognize the pic, and therefore was confused as to what you were talking about.  The reason I did not recognize the pic is because I've never seen an Abbott and Costello movie (I know, how can I call myself a movie fan?)  So, I didn't know what you were referring to.

Really? Then do yourself a favour, MissW, and, if you only ever watch one film of Bud and Lou, make it Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (which comes on TCM on occasion). The boys are at their best in this film but, even if you don't like their comedy shtick, they are only half the reason to watch the film. The monsters in the film, Dracula (Bela Lugosi), Wolf Man (Lon Chaney Jr.) and Frankenstein Monster (Glenn Strange) all have the opportunity to play the frights straight. The script does not poke fun at them, treating them with respect. In fact this film has the last great performance of Lugosi's career (though it was Chaney's Wolf Man who scared the heck out of me when I was a kid). All that, plus the highly effective musical accompaniment of Frank Skinner's score make this film an unqualified winner, in my opinion (and that of an awful lot of other people too).

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Speaking of comedy teams the Ritz Brothers are an acquired taste that I've never been able to acquire.

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6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I agree, GGGerald.  It's really noticable how few Black people Allen has in his films, it's always kind of bothered me a little.

OH YES? AND HOW MANY WHITE PEOPLE WERE IN THE FILMS OF OSCAR MICHEAUX? MOVIES ARE ART AND ART DOES NOT HAVE TO MIRROR LIFE.

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44 minutes ago, UMO1982 said:

OH YES? AND HOW MANY WHITE PEOPLE WERE IN THE FILMS OF OSCAR MICHEAUX? MOVIES ARE ART AND ART DOES NOT HAVE TO MIRROR LIFE.

Not really a fair comparison, because nobody made films about the black experience until the 1950s except for independents like Oscar Micheaux. Why should he not cater to a niche market and make films whose subject matter he very much cared about? 

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18 minutes ago, LsDoorMat said:

Not really a fair comparison, because nobody made films about the black experience until the 1950s except for independents like Oscar Micheaux. Why should he not cater to a niche market and make films whose subject matter he very much cared about? 

Why shouldn't Woody Allen?

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5 minutes ago, UMO1982 said:

Why shouldn't Woody Allen?

I don't think anybody is saying Woody Allen shouldn't examine the themes that he explores, it is just that the New York he appears to be living in is so very white. When New York is so very diverse and has been for decades. If his films were taking place in Casper, Wyoming his casting would make perfect sense. 

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13 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Whoa !  These newbies like to come on strong !  I'll pass on most of the people you dis,  but can't stay quiet about Frank Sinatra or James Stewart.  Frank, "punkish"?  What the hell does that even mean?    As for James Stewart, he was only like that ( "aw shucks")  in his early films.  He developed into a very fine actor, one of the best of Hollywood's greats.

Check him out in any of his work with Hitchcock or Anthony Mann-- there's no "aw shucks" persona, I assure you.

(Also, I love Jean Arthur,  and one of the reasons why is her voice. However, since I know there are some who don't like her unusual voice, I won't argue that one.)

Newbie perhaps but as a long time fan of older movies (1940s to 1960s), I'm as entitled to "strong" opinions as any one here. What I meant by "punk-ish" is the tough guy persona that Sinatra always seems to affect, i.e. acting like a "punk". It never came off as believable to me. Little man's bluster, in my opinion. 

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1 hour ago, LsDoorMat said:

I don't think anybody is saying Woody Allen shouldn't examine the themes that he explores, it is just that the New York he appears to be living in is so very white. When New York is so very diverse and has been for decades. If his films were taking place in Casper, Wyoming his casting would make perfect sense. 

Woody tells his stories. Spike Lee and Tyler Perry tell theirs. They are not obligated to tell YOURS.  Why is this hard to understand?

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2 hours ago, UMO1982 said:

OH YES? AND HOW MANY WHITE PEOPLE WERE IN THE FILMS OF OSCAR MICHEAUX? MOVIES ARE ART AND ART DOES NOT HAVE TO MIRROR LIFE.

Ok.   No need to use block caps.

I'm a huge fan of Woody Allen's work.  I should also note that I'm not particularly "woke" or PC or whatever the going term is.  However, having seen I think all of Allen's films over the years, I have noticed that there are almost no Black people or in fact any non-white people in his  movies. Very few, and they tend to be maids, etc.   And I suspect my friend TikiSoo was joking when she said  "Maybe because there are so few people of colour in NYC ?"

I realize a filmmaker tends to make films that reflect the world they live in (ok, scratch that, not always...)   And I guess the world Woody Allen lived in was predominantly white. Perhaps it would have been a bit too self-conscious or artificial of him to introduce Black characters into his stories if in his real life milieau he did not encounter people of colour. An exception I can think of is Melinda and Melinda (2004), in which a Black man , ( Chiwetel Ejiofor) ,  a jazz pianist as I recall, has a romance with the Melinda character. But even then, he's not the main character.

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