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What Percentage of Your Favourite Films Are Wrapped Up In Childhood Nostalgia?


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35 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Curious how you (or anyone else)  were able to view those 30s and 40s horror films when you were a child.      Of course there were T.V. stations that would show "old movies" but my parents didn't watch those stations much and often these stations showed those films either during the day or late at night (i.e. past prime time).      Thus my childhood viewing experience only included movies my parents took me to the theater to see during the late 60s and those were mostly Disney films like The Jungle Book.

Of course I have lot of childhood memories of T.V. shows I would watch with my siblings during the late 60s.

I have no memories of viewing any films from the 30s - 50s while I was a child.    I didn't start viewing films from those decades  until I was in my early 20s and discovered Bogie from my mom's boyfriend.

 

 

Maybe because every Halloween...

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Scary, I mean REALLY? :lol:

Back during the 1960's WSAZ had a "Chiller Theatre" every Saturday night.  Showed everything from  the old Godzilla / goofy aliens type films to the Universal classics.

Voyage To The Bottom of the Sea, Outer Limits, Twilight Zone  TV series were some  of my favorites.

 

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When I was a really young kid, my mom used to sit me down in front of the TV to watch "Dialing For Dollars", an afternoon program that showed an old film every weekday from 1pm-3pm. I remember that was my first viewing of WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE and Bette Davis scared me! About 7 years later, my parents started to take my older sisters and I on Saturday evenings to a privately owned movie house in the  Los Gatos, CA  area (where Olivia de Havilland grew up!) called The Vitaphone Theater.

This is it today:  http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/4914 

(You can scroll through the comments under the article to see what the couple who owned the theater was like.)

We saw mainly musicals, which I adored right out of the gate, but also all kinds of classics. I think the most recent film they ever showed was WAIT UNTIL DARK.  They would show Warner's Bros. Looney Tunes between features and the owners would introduce the films at the base of the stage. My parents were born during the great depression and grew up during WWII, so all these films were familiar to them. When we got home, I would ask them endless questions about when they first saw these films and I would spend hours thumbing through the TV Guide looking for when any old films would be on TV late at night or Saturday afternoon.  I actually started to annoy them with my obsession. 😄

Later, another private theater that showed old films, The Stanford Theater, would come along when I was now in my early 20's, and I would once again convince any family member who was interested to go along with me.

To this day, whenever a film shows on TCM that I saw as a kid, I can remember when I saw it with my family and what that evening's audience was like .

 

 

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I was raised on films from the studio system days so perhaps, unlike some others who didn't see the kind of films now so common place on TCM until their later years, it's easier for me to wax nostalgically about those films I saw as a kid and call many of them favourites today. In particular I saw a lot of films from Warner Brothers, so became very familiar with the likes of Cagney, Bogart and Flynn at a very young age. Many of these films were on late at night but there were also a lot of broadcasts from various television stations of old films during the day, as well. It was, therefore, at a very early age that I became a fan of films from the studio system days.

A special treat for me, living in the Toronto area, was Friday nights when there would be a late night horror double feature every week from WKBW in Buffalo, for a while memorably hosted by Adam Keefe, a Dracula imitator who, for all I know, may have inspired Joe Flaherty's Count Floyd spoof on SCTV years later. I even wrote Keefe a fan letter at the time. I ended the letter by saying, "If you can send me your autograph, fangs a lot. If not, fangs for nothing." Maybe he didn't find it as funny as I thought it was because I didn't hear back from him. In any event it was in this time slot that I saw many of the Universal horror films starring Chaney, Karloff and Lugosi, for which I still have a strong affection today.

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Curious how you (or anyone else)  were able to view those 30s and 40s horror films when you were a child.      Of course there were T.V. stations that would show "old movies" but my parents didn't watch those stations much and often these stations showed those films either during the day or late at night (i.e. past prime time).      Thus my childhood viewing experience only included movies my parents took me to the theater to see during the late 60s and those were mostly Disney films like The Jungle Book.

Of course I have lot of childhood memories of T.V. shows I would watch with my siblings during the late 60s.

I have no memories of viewing any films from the 30s - 50s while I was a child.    I didn't start viewing films from those decades  until I was in my early 20s and discovered Bogie from my mom's boyfriend.

 

We had two independent stations available that showed movies at 1pm and 7pm every weekday, plus late at night, and weekend afternoons.  Plus, one of the PBS affiliates showed films on Saturday evening, usually of a higher quality than the Saturday matinees.  The time slots were 2 hours long, so if the film was much longer than 100 minutes, it was cut.  Long movies like Giant (which seemed to play on one certain Dallas station every other month) would have been split across two nights.

I recently re-watched the Bette Davis interview on Dick Cavett the other night.  They showed a clip of Watch on the Rhine.  The print quality was awful (and this was on a major network), and it reminded of the days when local stations would get films in horrible condition because they had been passed around to a hundred other stations before then, not cared for, and spliced together.  It's amazing what we put up with back in the day.

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7 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

We had two independent stations available that showed movies at 1pm and 7pm every weekday, plus late at night, and weekend afternoons.  Plus, one of the PBS affiliates showed films on Saturday evening, usually of a higher quality than the Saturday matinees.  The time slots were 2 hours long, so if the film was much longer than 100 minutes, it was cut.  Long movies like Giant (which seemed to play on one certain Dallas station every other month) would have been split across two nights.

I recently re-watched the Bette Davis interview on Dick Cavett the other night.  They showed a clip of Watch on the RhineThe print quality was awful (and this was on a major network), and it reminded of the days when local stations would get films in horrible condition because they had been passed around to a hundred other stations before then, not cared for, and spliced together.  It's amazing what we put up with back in the day.

"Amazon Women on The Moon" satired those old TV film breaks.

There will be no further interruptions.

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Curious how you (or anyone else)  were able to view those 30s and 40s horror films when you were a child.      Of course there were T.V. stations that would show "old movies" but my parents didn't watch those stations much and often these stations showed those films either during the day or late at night (i.e. past prime time).      Thus my childhood viewing experience only included movies my parents took me to the theater to see during the late 60s and those were mostly Disney films like The Jungle Book.

Of course I have lot of childhood memories of T.V. shows I would watch with my siblings during the late 60s.

I have no memories of viewing any films from the 30s - 50s while I was a child.    I didn't start viewing films from those decades  until I was in my early 20s and discovered Bogie from my mom's boyfriend.

 

Well, you DID say your parents as a rule didn't watch those L.A. stations that showed those older films. However, mine did.

Some or maybe most of those older films were shown on L.A.'s independent channels (the one's not affiliated with the three major networks, 2,4 and 7) such as channel 5, 9, 11, and 13. And I recall them showing those older movies all the time, and pretty much throughout the day. I remember sitting with my parents and watching not only Universal horror films, but also many different genres of films, from Cary Grant movies to Marx Bro movies to westerns and musicals. And then on channel-9, an RKO owned station, there was always 'The Million Dollar Movie' series (just as there was in NYC) and where they'd show the same old movie all week during prime time. Those almost always were studio era films.

(...and so that's how I got into this whole thing, and at a young age)

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Some of the first PG movies I saw in the theater when I was in elementary school still resonate most strongly with me, and perhaps I am more inclined to rate them higher than I might otherwise. I mean, Star Wars was probably the first PG movie I ever saw in a theater, and no doubt it was my favorite movie of all time for many years, but I really mean movies that I attended with my parents that weren't really targeted for me so much, movies that made me first understand what movies could be capable of. Some examples are Heaven Can WaitFoul Play and The China Syndrome.

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I have great nostalgia for two series of films that were on local television in NYC when I was a child.

Million Dollar Movie on Channel 9 (WOR). I was introduced to Follow the Fleet, Navy Blues, King Kong, Station West, dozens of others. A great education for a wee lad. 

Shock Theater on Channel 7 (WABC) introduced me to the horror genre, via the Universal library. Dracula's Daughter, Werewolf of London, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, The Wolf Man,  the Frankenstein and Mummy movies, and even such rarities as Mystery of Marie Roget and The Mad Doctor of Market Street. Most of the films were introduced by Zacherley, who was accompanied by his wife Isobel and his son Gasport, who was some sort of creature who moaned once in a while.

I loved all of those movies and still do. Seeing them at an early age indoctrinated into me a love of movies  which is why I am on this Board now.

(I couldn't find the clapperboard that was the original logo for Million Dollar Movie, with "Tara's Theme" playing in the background.)

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36 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I have great nostalgia for two series of films that were on local television in NYC when I was a child.

Million Dollar Movie on Channel 9 (WOR). I was introduced to Follow the Fleet, Navy Blues, King Kong, Station West, dozens of others. A great education for a wee lad. 

(I couldn't find the clapperboard that was the original logo for Million Dollar Movie, with "Tara's Theme" playing in the background.)

What, you mean this one?:  

(Must've been before my time, I lived upstate and only remember the Times Square opening...)

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53 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I have great nostalgia for two series of films that were on local television in NYC when I was a child.

Million Dollar Movie on Channel 9 (WOR). I was introduced to Follow the Fleet, Navy Blues, King Kong, Station West, dozens of others. A great education for a wee lad. 

Shock Theater on Channel 7 (WABC) introduced me to the horror genre, via the Universal library. Dracula's Daughter, Werewolf of London, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, The Wolf Man,  the Frankenstein and Mummy movies, and even such rarities as Mystery of Marie Roget and The Mad Doctor of Market Street. Most of the films were introduced by Zacherley, who was accompanied by his wife Isobel and his son Gasport, who was some sort of creature who moaned once in a while.

I loved all of those movies and still do. Seeing them at an early age indoctrinated into me a love of movies  which is why I am on this Board now.

(I couldn't find the clapperboard that was the original logo for Million Dollar Movie, with "Tara's Theme" playing in the background.)

MV5BNGYzNzVmMGMtYjgwNy00ZTkyLTk5YmQtZjE5

Yep, and just think here, Swithin. MOST of those old movies you watched in NYC, USA back then, weren't even in colour!

(...ahem, sorry..I meant COLOR, of course...I mean, we ARE talkin' "NYC, USA" here, weren't WE?!) ;)

LOL

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Million Dollar Movie would run the same flick two or three times a day, so if you missed one showing

there was another one on the way.

I didn't realize Zacherley was on ABC. I remember him from Chiller Theater, which was on WPIX. It

started earlier in the evening on Saturdays. I used to wash up, put on my pjs and then sit back and watch

Chiller Theater. And then, shortly afterwards, it was off to bed. In a really weird career change, he later

became a prog rock dj. 

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Million Dollar Movie would run the same flick two or three times a day, so if you missed one showing

there was another one on the way.

I didn't realize Zacherley was on ABC. I remember him from Chiller Theater, which was on WPIX. It

started earlier in the evening on Saturdays. I used to wash up, put on my pjs and then sit back and watch

Chiller Theater. And then, shortly afterwards, it was off to bed. In a really weird career change, he later

became a prog rock dj. 

Not sure that's true, Vautrin. At least it wasn't true with the RKO-owned KHJ channel 9 station we had out in L.A.

As I remember it, the Million Dollar Movie aired the same flick every weeknight during the prime time hours of 8pm-10pm, but never more than once a day.

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

No sure that's true, Vautrin. At least it wasn't true with the RKO-owned KHJ channel 9 station we had out in L.A.

As I remember it, the Million Dollar Movie aired the same flick every weeknight during the prime time hours of 8pm-10pm, but never more than once a day.

It's been so long that I made a quick check of some of the details. MDM  ran the same movie twice a night for a

whole week, Monday through Friday. I thought they ran it all week, then I thought Did they really do that? Yep, they

did. It had a 90 minute running time, so those flicks must have been pretty well butchered. Oh well I didn't realize

that at the time. Can you imagine a 120 minute  movie running in 90 minutes plus commercials. Yikes. 

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10 hours ago, EricJ said:

What, you mean this one?:  

(Must've been before my time, I lived upstate and only remember the Times Square opening...)

Something like that, but it wasn't in color, and I don't remember the buildings in front of it.  (Actually, there may have been b&w silhouettes of buildings). That looks like a tarted up version of what I used to see, at least in the early days. 

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10 hours ago, Dargo said:

Yep, and just think here, Swithin. MOST of those old movies you watched in NYC, USA back then, weren't even in colour!

(...ahem, sorry..I meant COLOR, of course...I mean, we ARE talkin' "NYC, USA" here, weren't WE?!) ;)

LOL

And if they had been in color, I wouldn't have known it, since we had a black-and-white TV!

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19 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Curious how you (or anyone else)  were able to view those 30s and 40s horror films when you were a child.      Of course there were T.V. stations that would show "old movies" but my parents didn't watch those stations much and often these stations showed those films either during the day or late at night (i.e. past prime time).      Thus my childhood viewing experience only included movies my parents took me to the theater to see during the late 60s and those were mostly Disney films like The Jungle Book.

Of course I have lot of childhood memories of T.V. shows I would watch with my siblings during the late 60s.

I have no memories of viewing any films from the 30s - 50s while I was a child.    I didn't start viewing films from those decades  until I was in my early 20s and discovered Bogie from my mom's boyfriend.

 

So, was there some kind of restriction that you couldn't watch TV in the daytime?  So, your parents didn't watch those stations, so I'm also guessing that the channel tuning dial must have been really complicated for a kid to figure out how to use?  I don't get it.  ;) 

20 hours ago, hamradio said:

Can't give a percentage but but my childhood memories mostly are  Frankenstein, Dracula, The Wolfman.  Vincent Price films.  "Black Sunday" where that mask scared me so bad I thought it was a wide eyed gorilla like creature. (I was 7 at the time).

Jerry Lewis, WC Fields, Little Rascals, Andy Clyde, 3 Stooges films

 

 

Yeah, I remember BLACK SUNDAY had the rep supposedly making it the scariest movie ever made at the time.  I was 9 when it came out.  Later, it's "scariest" status was replaced by PREMATURE BURIAL.  Was some years before I finally saw them and they left me wondering what the big too-doo was about them.(yawn).

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, Swithin said:

And if they had been in color, I wouldn't have known it, since we had a black-and-white TV!

Yep, same here until around 1962, and when we got that 25in Zenith model which looked kind'a like this as I recall...

OIP.7wizhXPVz9ecxYvv4SG8xAHaE9?w=238&h=1

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11 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yep, same here until around 1962, and when we got that 25in Zenith model which looked kind'a like this as I recall...

OIP.7wizhXPVz9ecxYvv4SG8xAHaE9?w=238&h=1

Hey, I can almost see a flickering old image of Moe boinking Curly on the head on your set now!

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

So, was there some kind of restriction that you couldn't watch TV in the daytime?  So, your parents didn't watch those stations, so I'm also guessing that the channel tuning dial must have been really complicated for a kid to figure out how to use?  I don't get it. 

My mom didn't let us watch T.V. during the day.      Instead I had to practice the violin and learn Japanese.   

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 "My mom didn't let us watch T.V. during the day.      Instead I had to practice the violin and learn Japanese."

 In defense of jamesjazzguitar, I was already going to suggest that some parents were stricter about television viewing. Also, unless it was raining, kids back then were often outside playing -  not watching some old movie. In the San Fernando Valley during the Seventies, boys spent hours riding around on their Schwinn Sting-Ray style bikes, gettin' into no-good and playing Little League baseball.....

 I even remember this cute tomboy pitcher with her cut stirrup stockings and adidas SUPERLIGHTs: bad-news-bears_l-1.jpg?w=300 !

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On 8/29/2020 at 9:56 AM, TomJH said:

Speaking for myself I must say that a very large number of my movie favourites are, indeed, films that I enjoyed on television as a kid.

It's always a particular joy, of course, when you think those films hold up well. But even in the case of many (not all) of those that don't stand the test of time so well when viewed through adult eyes I will still have a sentimental feel for the pleasure that they had once brought me as a young person.

Now I have seen any of a number of fine films made within the past 20 years or so. Yet I'm hard pressed that any of them have the same emotional pull for me as do those films that I enjoyed during those years that first introduced me to the movies and for the next ten or fifteen years or so beyond that, as well.

Among those that I adored as a kid that still excite me and I regard as all time favourites:

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Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. I recall first watching this film as I sat on Dad's lap and covering my eyes with my hands (though peaking through my fingers, of course) whenever the Wolf Man appeared.

captain-blood

Captain Blood. Aye, matey, ahoy and watch those sails fill with the breeze that will take us all to freedom! My love affair with anything Errol Flynn pretty well began with this pirate flick, which also made me a fan of swashbucklers in general.

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The Mark of Zorro. Another stylish swashbuckler that thrilled me (still does!) and had me writing a fan letter to Basil Rathbone.

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Lives of a Bengal Lancer. It's the British Empire at the Khyber Pass and an incredibly heroic Gary Cooper out to save that empire. Later I saw Gunga Din and The Four Feathers but my love of these kind of (politically dated and frequently racially insensitive) adventures began with countless views of this one on the TV.

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Treasure of the Sierra Madre. More adventure for my adventure loving young heart, though coupled this time with adult themes involving greed and human frailty. Bogart, Huston, Holt and that Gold Hat Bandit, saw them all as a kid, and continue to put this classic on again every few years. It still never fails to entertain me.

 

So how about other posters here? How much of a role does childhood nostalgia play for you when you come to choosing your film favourites today?

great shots

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Every tie when we came to the US our parents encouraged us to watch TV so that we could be familiarized with English and learn as many words as we could. Saturday morning cartoons were a must, and sometimes during the day I would watch some shows about vampires in mansions, witches twitching their noses, even some game shows.  I didn't understand much, so I usually lost interest pretty soon and turned off the set.

I also watched a lot of old movies, mostly low budget horror and science fiction.

One of the fondest memory I have of going to the movies is the time I took my younger brother to see Bedknobs and Broomsticks.

I went to see Oliver! with some friends and we loved it. Children playing criminals and getting away with it, of course we loved it. Then, a few years later, Melody was a big hit in school, when we started to change. We identified with the characters, young love, the class differences, life in school.

Another movie I never forgot is Dirkie, about a young boy who gets lost in the Kalahari. Its was a haunting experience.

I forgot the question was about percentages. Very, very small, I guess.

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12 minutes ago, Arsan404 said:

Every tie when we came to the US our parents encouraged us to watch TV so that we could be familiarized with English and learn as many words as we could. 

12 minutes ago, Arsan404 said:

 

I hope you don't mind me asking, but where did you grow up before coming to the US?

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