Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Glad to see the lineup of concert movies. . . .


Recommended Posts

17 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

But. . .but Monterey Pop is better!

Gotta catch that Raptors game, Monterey Pop has the audacity to be at the back half of it, where in the back half of Game 4, with 0.5 seconds to go, Lowry threw the ball inbound from one side to another for OG to catch and shoot the game winning 3-pointer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ABBA: The Movie is not exactly the best work of Lasse Hallstrom, who is listed as director, co-writer, and co-editor. ABBA was especially popular in Australia, as we know from such films as Muriel's Wedding and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert. Therefore, a documentary about an ABBA tour of Australia might tell us something about this phenomenon or about the music or the members of the group. Hey, how about this instead: we follow in excruciating detail a country music DJ who's forced by his station manager to come back with an exclusive interview with ABBA and instead he's always a day late and a dollar short, no press pass, no tickets, etc. This is even lamer than it sounds. Throw in lots of footage of the DJ asking people why they love ABBA, and the answer is usually that they are neat and clean. I'm not sure if anyone ever says that they are high energy and fun, which would probably be the best answer.

The three best moments: 1) One tech guy comments that ABBA's recordings are so carefully put together in the studio that no one could take all of the individual bits and put them back together in any other way. 2) We learn that Agnetha has won an award for having the sexiest bottom. There's a great tabloid headline: "Agnetha's Bottom Tops Show." 3) A great line from the odious station manager: "Don't use that word!! It's not a DOCUMENTARY. It's an event."

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a musician, but some of Jimmy's solos seemed rather self-indulgent and overlong. Maybe if

you were there and on something they were just fine. Right in the middle of Stairway to Heaven it

just clicked in my mind that they were going to play Moby Dick. Time for a snack break. The fantasy

sequences were dull, though knowing that Robert Plant had an interest in medieval history and

Jimmy Page was into the occult, they made sense. It was laughable to see Peter Grant going ballistic

over some poor schlub selling Zeppelin posters without proper permission. Yeah, that put a huge hole

in Zeppelin's profits. At least that fat bastard is dead. Good riddance. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

 Re: "...see Peter Grant going ballistic over some poor schlub selling Zeppelin posters without proper permission. Yeah, that put a huge hole in Zeppelin's profits. At least that fat bastard is dead. Good riddance."

 A similar thought could be offered up for John Bonham who, if the stories are true, could be pretty bad as well. I think that Clockwork Orange garb he sported for at least one show was befitting the Bonham reputation:

                                                                                                                                                   th?id=OIP.fIg5RGUxIE-LWPwDhCaf2gHaEK&pid=Api&P=0&w=276&h=156

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vautrin said:

I'm not a musician, but some of Jimmy's solos seemed rather self-indulgent and overlong. Maybe if

you were there and on something they were just fine.

I kept thinking about the sequence in which they played "Dazed And Confused" and Jimmy Page uses a Cello Bow on his guitar. I've seen this done by numerous artists and it gives the guitar a truly lonesome and haunting sound, but Page was just making noise with it like a kid would do. I thought that way when I saw the film in 1979 and I still feel that way! I just can't understand why someone as gifted as he would not use the bow professionally.

I did have the opportunity to see Page live in the 1980's in a supergroup raising money for Multiple Sclerosis. He played his trademark rock riffs but also some very nice Blues guitar and some  outstanding acoustic Classical and Flamenco guitar.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ampersand said:

Gotta catch that Raptors game, Monterey Pop has the audacity to be at the back half of it, where in the back half of Game 4, with 0.5 seconds to go, Lowry threw the ball inbound from one side to another for OG to catch and shoot the game winning 3-pointer.

What do you think of the fans that are "in the stands" via Skype or whatever virtual video/meeting service they're using?  I find the virtual fans in the NBA games better than the cardboard cut-out fans in MLB.  At least the NBA fans move and react.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NoShear said:

 A similar thought could be offered up for John Bonham who, if the stories are true, could be pretty bad as well. I think that Clockwork Orange garb he sported for at least one show was befitting the Bonham reputation:

                                                                                                                                                   th?id=OIP.fIg5RGUxIE-LWPwDhCaf2gHaEK&pid=Api&P=0&w=276&h=156

I got out my dusty copy of Hammer of the Gods. According to it Bonham's main problem was that he was

a very mean drunk and he was often drunk on tours. When sober he wasn't bad at all. Grant was a full-time

bastard. Plus Grant was a lot fatter than Bonzo. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

 Re: "I got out my dusty copy of Hammer of the Gods. According to it Bonham's main problem was that he was a very mean drunk and he was often drunk on tours. When sober he wasn't bad at all."

 It was the inebriated drummer to whom I was addressing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, sagebrush said:

I kept thinking about the sequence in which they played "Dazed And Confused" and Jimmy Page uses a Cello Bow on his guitar. I've seen this done by numerous artists and it gives the guitar a truly lonesome and haunting sound, but Page was just making noise with it like a kid would do. I thought that way when I saw the film in 1979 and I still feel that way! I just can't understand why someone as gifted as he would not use the bow professionally.

I did have the opportunity to see Page live in the 1980's in a supergroup raising money for Multiple Sclerosis. He played his trademark rock riffs but also some very nice Blues guitar and some  outstanding acoustic Classical and Flamenco guitar.

Maybe by that time Zeppelin was so popular that Page thought he could do whatever he wanted and

people would accept it or not care. No one doubts that he is a very talented musician. I just found some

of his playing in the movie excessive. That still pales compared to all the wonderful music he produced

with Zeppelin. I remember some guy telling me how Page bowed his guitar when he was still with The

Yardbirds. He was so excited about it I thought he was going to pass out.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NoShear said:

 It was the inebriated drummer to whom I was addressing.

I realize that. I just think that Grant was a bigger bastard than Bonham, bigger in every respect.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

What do you think of the fans that are "in the stands" via Skype or whatever virtual video/meeting service they're using?  I find the virtual fans in the NBA games better than the cardboard cut-out fans in MLB.  At least the NBA fans move and react.

I like it! Has more life to it than cardboard, even if you can print out joke cardboard ones, know they had a few around in some games. And their reactions to a spectacular play or when it goes down to the last minute, buzzer beater or not.

And after today's game, I should have just rewatched Monterey Pop. Just cut my losses early on. But I did swap over to TCM for Jammin' the Blues, top shelf jam session.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I realize that. I just think that Grant was a bigger bastard than Bonham, bigger in every respect.

 I was thinking how a man like Peter Grant could evolve into the monster you write of, Vautrin, and I thought of the rock world with its bouncers and other charming trappings: Sure enough, Peter Grant's history included security!   

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, he came from a rough and tumble background, including being security.  He certainly had the

build for it. I wouldn't go so far as to call him a monster. He was only a manipulative dirt bag.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Festival (1967) was an interesting documentary on Newport Folk Festival from 1963-1966. It had snippets of songs and some interviews with audience members. One of my favorite moments was Joan Baez signing autographs and she sings a little of the The Beatles song "From Me To You".  Bob Dylan is seen doing his electric version of "Maggie's Farm" but we don't get to see the audience booing him, since the folk fans did not like him going electric. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, slaytonf said:

But. . .but Monterey Pop is better!

??  Better than WHAT?  I only like to view it from time to time for the nostalgic quality of it for me.  And it was the first time many of those in the audience and people in general saw artists the like of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Ravi Shankar.   Other than that, IMO it always struck me as a poorly filmed and directed flick. And it too always makes me sad to realize that just when Janis finally gets a decent band to back her( Full Tilt Boogie Band) she died.  The Kozmic Blues Band was pretty good too.  Hell, I thought ANYTHING would be better than Big Brother!  :huh:  And always dug those two shots during Shankar's performance.  The one of Hendrix in the audience watching and followed by a shot of MIKE BLOOMFIELD looking mesmerized.  Either that or he was a bit stoned or going through another period of his chronic insomnia.  ;) 

And I've seen WOODSTOCK so many times when it came out(seven if memory serves) and also possess three copies of it( one bought early in the VHS days of the original theatrical release) and two of the director's cut( one on tape, the other on DVD) that I really didn't need to sit through all of it last night.  I turned in after TEN YEARS AFTER's "I'm Going Home" segment. 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Better than WHAT

Woodstock. 

 

3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

artists the like of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix and Ravi Shankar.   Other than that, IMO it always struck me as a poorly filmed and directed flick

These artist's performances are why Mon Pop is better. Who cares about the filming and direction?  It's all about the music.   Janis kills. Jimi destroys. Ravi enthralls. And The Who. And Otis.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tried watching Shine a Light (2008).  It was so visually tiring I gave up in less than twenty minutes.  The energy in a concert movie has to come from the performers.  Scorsese seemed to think it necessary to have vigorous camera movement and fierce editing to capture or communicate the Stones' performance.  For me, it was a distraction.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, slaytonf said:

Tried watching Shine a Light (2008).  It was so visually tiring I gave up in less than twenty minutes. 

I caught & watched one segment. Although I'm not a Rolling Stones fan, I was amazed at Mick Jaggar's talent to capture a crowd-not unlike movie "star" quality. Glad I took my Mom to see them in the 70's.

I find stage performance thrilling for the most part, although the other snippet I watched of Jimi Hendrix was a bore. He fiddled around with his guitar & the speakers as if having sex (shocking? um, no) with it. Self indulgent, dumb.

I also saw just one song of ABBA and was amazed they could actually sing & play just like their recordings sound and suspect lip synching.

Seeing throngs of people enjoying a live performance became too sad for me to watch. Who would have thought that would become nostalgic? Sigh.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/7/2020 at 11:20 PM, NoShear said:

 I was thinking how a man like Peter Grant could evolve into the monster you write of, Vautrin, and I thought of the rock world with its bouncers and other charming trappings: Sure enough, Peter Grant's history included security!   

At a Grateful Dead concert in the late '60's at the Filmore East, my boyfriend  and I were thrown out by Hell's  Angel types ( although I think they may have been Hells Angels). the people sitting next to us were smoking and asked us to pass the joint to the couple on the other side of us. This big brutish guy saw this I guess thought we were smoking, took my boyfriend and I and  by the collar, threw us down a flight of stairs and out of the Filmore. It was such a scary situation, he refused to listen to us that it wasn't us smoking, good thing that's all that creep did although there were some black and blues.  I was a Dead fan and had seen them many times but I lost a lot of respect for them because of the security measures they used.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure.  Using bikers as security! :rolleyes:  What could possibly go wrong?  ;)  Well, just ask Mick!  :D 

Now, for SLAYTON   

I think the film footage(most of it) of the artists' performances in WOODSTOCK are much better than Monterey Pop.  Although, in the "director's cut" they could have gotten better footage of CANNED HEAT and left out all the extra Jefferson Airplane and instead put in some footage of PAUL BUTTERFIELD or JOHNNY WINTER.  But that's only because I didn't like the Airplane as much as the other two.  ;)  I never thought The Jefferson Airplane were the quintessential '60's rock band a lot of other people seemed to.   And in Monterey, I thought one of the better performances, but also the worst filmed was of OTIS REDDING.  It's never a good idea to point the camera's lens directly into the stage lights.  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Sure.  Using bikers as security! :rolleyes:  What could possibly go wrong?  ;)  Well, just ask Mick!  :D 

  

Sepiatone

Absolutely, however no group including the Dead ever did that before at the Filmore East and I can't say for certain which concert ( the Dead at the Filmore, or the Stones at Altamont came first) but I'd imagine it would have been the Filmore concert).  Luckily my boyfriend and I didn't get clubbered in the head or worse. I did go to the Filmore many times after that, and no Biker security was there again, and of course had we seen the Bikers in the first place we probably would have thought twice about going into the building.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...