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On 9/19/2020 at 11:03 AM, TopBilled said:

GUY KIBBEE

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THE CONQUERORS (1932)
M'LISS (1936)
DON'T TELL THE WIFE (1937)
THE BIG SHOT (1937)
RIDING ON AIR (1937)
JOY OF LIVING (1938)
SCATTERGOOD BAINES (1941)
SCATTERGOOD PULLS THE STRINGS (1941)
SCATTERGOOD MEETS BROADWAY (1941)
SCATTERGOOD RIDES HIGH (1942)
SCATTERGOOD SURVIVES A MURDER (1942)
CINDERELLA SWINGS IT (1943)
FORT APACHE (1948)

you forgot Captain January with Shirley Temple.

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2 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

you forgot Captain January with Shirley Temple.

Hi Nip...

CAPTAIN JANUARY is not an RKO picture. So it will be included on another list for Guy Kibbee when we do the "At 20th Century Fox" thread.

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RICARDO CORTEZ

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WHITE SHOULDERS (1931)
BEHIND OFFICE DOORS (1931)
TRANSGRESSION (1931)
BAD COMPANY (1931)
SYMPHONY OF SIX MILLION (1932)
THIRTEEN WOMEN (1932)
MEN OF CHANCE (1932)
IS MY FACE RED? (1932)
THE PHANTOM OF CRESTWOOD (1932)
HAT COAT AND GLOVE (1934)
THE LOCKET (1946)
MYSTERY IN MEXICO (1948)
BUNCO SQUAD (1950)

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On 9/18/2020 at 11:20 PM, TopBilled said:

Update--

I finished watching SIN TAKES A HOLIDAY (1930). I thought it was fantastic and gave it a high score on the IMDb.

Supposedly 34 different sets were built for the production, and it's obvious they (meaning Pathe) poured a lot of money into it. One set I think was reused for THE ROYAL BED(1931) because it looked awfully familiar. A front entrance hall with a large wide staircase.

It occurred to me how much Constance Bennett is a fashionista in her movies. I think she had her own clothing line at some point. Even when she is playing a downtrodden secretary at the beginning, before marrying into money, she adds these little decorate touches to her clothing and she wears very striking hats.

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I loved Kenneth MacKenna as the lead, and I read up on him. Seems he was married to Kay Francis around this time, the two of them having made a film together at Paramount also in 1930. He became a director at Fox and then a story editor at MGM but still occasionally acted on stage and in films. He works very well with Ms. Bennett. A year earlier he had headlined a picture with her sister, Joan.

Basil Rathbone is playing the second male lead and it's a heel type role. He is not exactly villainous but he's definitely amoral. You really don't want his character to end up stealing Bennett away...at least I did not...and was certainly glad she was in MacKenna's arms at the end of the last scene.

Supporting players were fine, including ZaSu Pitts in what was probably for her a rather thankless assignment. Again the sets, clothing and the lead stars were all fantastic. And while the middle part dragged a bit, I thought the story overall was structured pretty well. The emotional/dramatic payoff in the last act was immensely satisfying.  

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This is swell review (I love the observations about the clothes and sets), although I do disagree with your opinion of Rathbone and the ending.  This is one of the few films in which he doesn't play a heel.  I think he's fallen for Bennett from the beginning, and tries to help her out by introducing her to more cosmopolitan ways.  I'm rather disappointed that she ends up with MacKenna, whose character, in my opinion, was unworthy of her.   

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13 hours ago, rosebette said:

This is swell review (I love the observations about the clothes and sets), although I do disagree with your opinion of Rathbone and the ending.  This is one of the few films in which he doesn't play a heel.  I think he's fallen for Bennett from the beginning, and tries to help her out by introducing her to more cosmopolitan ways.  I'm rather disappointed that she ends up with MacKenna, whose character, in my opinion, was unworthy of her.   

Glad the review was to your liking. I found Rathbone's character a bit amoral because he knew she was married and yet was still pursuing her. Plus it seemed like he was always on the rebound and his relationships with women were of little or no consequence except maybe sexually, which was implied. Granted he did not have sex with Bennett's character but it was clear he wanted to do that very much.

In a way I think the film, despite it having been made and released during the precode era, is a morality tale about marriage. Bennett's character ultimately has to go back to her husband (Kenneth MacKenna) and enjoy a real marriage. That's the "message" the audience gets.

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BILL WILLIAMS

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THE BODY SNATCHER (1945)
ZOMBIES ON BROADWAY (1945)
THOSE ENDEARING YOUNG CHARMS (1945)
BACK TO BATAAN (1945)
WEST OF THE PECOS (1945)
JOHNNY ANGEL (1945)
SING YOUR WAY HOME (1945)
DEADLINE AT DAWN (1946)
TILL THE END OF TIME (1946)
A LIKELY STORY (1947)
A WOMAN'S SECRET (1949)
THE CLAY PIGEON (1949)
A DANGEROUS PROFESSION (1949)
THE PACE THAT THRILLS (1952)

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Thought I'd take a moment to go over RKO's British productions.

Sometimes these films use American cast, and even if they don't, the studio is still financing these productions in Britain. They always get an American release though sometimes it is several months or even a year or two after the UK release. In terms of dates, I always list the year it was first released. So if something was released in 1943 in Britain then had its U.S. release in 1944, I consider it a 1943 film.

There were nine RKO British productions:

MEET MAXWELL ARCHER (1940)...starring John Loder. It did not get a U.S. release until 1942.
THE SAINT’S VACATION (1941)...starring Hugh Sinclair.
THE SAINT MEETS THE TIGER (1941)...also starring Hugh Sinclair. RKO was sued by Leslie Charteris, the author of the Saint stories for copyright infringement when it created The Falcon series. So RKO sold the negative to Republic which released it in 1943 in the U.S. However I do consider this an RKO film since it was produced by RKO, even if it was later distributed by Republic. RKO did release it in Britain in 1941.
SQUADRON LEADER X (1943)...starring Ann Dvorak and a British supporting cast.
ESCAPE TO DANGER (1943)...also starring Ann Dvorak and a British supporting cast.
YELLOW CANARY (1943)...starring Anna Neagle, a British lead actress who had made previous films at RKO in Hollywood. It premiered in Britain in December 1943 but did not get its U.S. release until 1944.
GREAT DAY (1945)...starring Flora Robson and a British cast. This wartime picture was released in Britain in 1945 during the last days of the war. But it did not have its American release until 1946, after the war had ended.
SO WELL REMEMBERED (1947)...with Martha Scott and Richard Carlson, and a British cast. Directed by RKO studio director Edward Dmytryk.

NOTE: There were some other films made in Britain that RKO released, but they were independent films the studio did not finance. RKO just helped with distribution in America. They may have the RKO logo on them, but I am not counting those since they are technically not studio productions. This tended to happen in the mid-to-late 1950s when the studio's own output had slowed and RKO still had to honor commitments to release a certain number of films into American theaters. In addition to independent British productions, RKO also released several feature-length documentaries that were made outside the studio by other companies and unless there is evidence that RKO financed the filming, I am not counting those titles either.

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Additionally...

These films were distributed through RKO in America, but I do not consider them RKO films because the studio did not finance their production. 

Samuel Goldwyn (releases thru RKO)
THE LITTLE FOXES (1941)
BALL OF FIRE (1941)
THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES (1941)
THEY GOT ME COVERED (1943)
THE PRINCESS AND THE PIRATE (1943)
THE NORTH STAR (1943)
UP IN ARMS (1944)
WONDER MAN (1945)
THE KID FROM BROOKLYN (1946)
THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946)
THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (1947)
THE BISHOP’S WIFE (1947)
A SONG IS BORN (1948)
ENCHANTMENT (1948)
ROSEANNA MCCOY (1949)
MY FOOLISH HEART (1949)
OUR VERY OWN (1950)
EDGE OF DOOM (1950)
I WANT YOU (1951)
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN (1952)

Disney (releases thru RKO)
SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)
PINOCCHIO (1940)
FANTASIA (1940)
THE RELUCTANT DRAGON (1941)
DUMBO (1941)
BAMBI (1942)
SALUDOS AMIGOS (1943)
THE THREE CABALLEROS (1945)
SONG OF THE SOUTH (1946)
FUN AND FANCY FREE (1947)
MELODY TIME (1948)
SO DEAR TO MY HEART (1949)
THE ADVENTURES OF ICHABOD AND MR. TOAD  (1949)
CINDERELLA (1950)
TREASURE ISLAND (1950)
ALICE IN WONDERLAND (1951)
THE STORY OF ROBIN HOOD AND HIS MERRIE MEN (1952)
THE SWORD AND THE ROSE (1953)
PETER PAN (1953)
ROB ROY: THE HIGHLAND ROGUE (1953)

Of course there were many animated shorts that Disney released through RKO from 1937 to 1956.

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