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Since so many of your are much more knowledgeable than I,  perhaps there is someone who can enlighten me.  Most of us know that early in her career, Ann Blyth was under contract with Universal and made quite a number of movies there.  Later on she went to MGM, where she alternated between musicals and dramas.  I notice that around 1949 and 1950 she was making movies at both studios, going from one studio to the other.  Is it possible that during this time she was under contact with both studios?

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26 minutes ago, Terrence1 said:

Since so many of your are much more knowledgeable than I,  perhaps there is someone who can enlighten me.  Most of us know that early in her career, Ann Blyth was under contract with Universal and made quite a number of movies there.  Later on she went to MGM, where she alternated between musicals and dramas.  I notice that around 1949 and 1950 she was making movies at both studios, going from one studio to the other.  Is it possible that during this time she was under contact with both studios?

Sometimes that would happen, the contracts would be shared by two studios or production companies. It was probably a cost-saving measure.

This is of course different from being under contract to one major studio or company and getting temporarily loaned out.

Examples:

  • John Hodiak's contract was shared by MGM and 20th Century Fox in the mid-40s.
  • Dana Andrews' contract was shared by Samuel Goldwyn and 20th Century Fox in the 40s.
  • Maureen O'Hara had a contract with 20th Century Fox in the 40s, but she also was contracted to RKO during the same period and owed them one film a year.
  • John Carroll's contract was shared by MGM and Republic Pictures in the 40s. Eventually Republic bought out MGM's share and Carroll was exclusively under contract at Republic in the 50s.
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12 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Sometimes that would happen, the contracts would be shared by two studios or production companies. It was probably a cost-saving measure.

This is of course different from being under contract to one major studio or company and getting temporarily loaned out.

Examples:

  • John Hodiak's contract was shared by MGM and 20th Century Fox in the mid-40s.
  • Dana Andrews' contract was shared by Samuel Goldwyn and 20th Century Fox in the 40s.
  • Maureen O'Hara had a contract with 20th Century Fox in the 40s, but she also was contracted to RKO during the same period and owed them one film a year.
  • John Carroll's contract was shared by MGM and Republic Pictures in the 40s. Eventually Republic bought out MGM's share and Carroll was exclusively under contract at Republic in the 50s.

I think in this case, she was loaned out, as she made pictures for a variety of production companies prior to her MGM contract.    After the mid-1940s, she made films for the following studios/production companies outside of Universal:

  • Warner Bros. : Mildred Pierce (1945)
  • MGM:  Killer McCoy (1947), The Great Caruso (1951)
  • Paramount: Top o' the Morning (1949)
  • Sam Goldwyn:  Our Very Own (1950) - released by RKO
  • 20th Century Fox: I'll Never Forget You (1951)
  • RKO: One Minute to Zero (1952)

She was also supposed to make Danger Signal (1945) for WB, which would have reunited her with Zachary Scott, but was replaced in the role due to a broken back.

She left Universal and signed on with MGM in 1953.  It's unclear to me whether MGM's All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953) was made with Blyth under her MGM contract or on loan-out.

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58 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I think in this case, she was loaned out, as she made pictures for a variety of production companies prior to her MGM contract.    After the mid-1940s, she made films for the following studios/production companies outside of Universal:

  • Warner Bros. : Mildred Pierce (1945)
  • MGM:  Killer McCoy (1947), The Great Caruso (1951)
  • Paramount: Top o' the Morning (1949)
  • Sam Goldwyn:  Our Very Own (1950) - released by RKO
  • 20th Century Fox: I'll Never Forget You (1951)
  • RKO: One Minute to Zero (1952)

She was also supposed to make Danger Signal (1945) for WB, which would have reunited her with Zachary Scott, but was replaced in the role due to a broken back.

She left Universal and signed on with MGM in 1953.  It's unclear to me whether MGM's All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953) was made with Blyth under her MGM contract or on loan-out.

If you notice, I did not include Ann Blyth when I was replying to the OP. Mainly because I hadn't reviewed her filmography especially with regards to the period that was mentioned.

However, the people I mentioned did have contracts shared between two studios or production companies. I think Cary Grant also had his contract shared between Columbia and RKO in the late 30s to mid-40s. But at some point in the post-war period he became a freelancer.

In terms of the films you cited for Ann Blyth, she was a replacement for Claudette Colbert in ONE MINUTE TO ZERO, who bowed out due to illness. Colbert still owed RKO a picture so she later made TEXAS LADY (1955) for the studio. But Colbert was a freelancer in the 50s.

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  • 4 weeks later...

It's also possible that, while under contract to one studio, she was loaned out to another. That was a fairly common practice in those days.

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Ann was my all-time favorite "Arabian princess" type in The Golden Horde (1951) for her home studio. She played the princess Shalimar, whose city was under attack from Genghis Khan, and had the greatest "princessy" wardrobe ever, complete with ridiculous headgear. David Farrar was her co-star and they made a beautiful couple.

 

 

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This interview doesn't directly answer your question, but sheds some light on her career.   It was done when she was the special honoree at the TCM Classic Film Festival in 2013 - interviewed by the Hollywood Reporter -

 

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