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I asked this question to @_BetteDavis on Twitter, but no reply.  Maybe someone can help me here.  I looove making dresses for myself, and never made one for selling.  I'd like to try making a dress for selling.  And I'd like to try making a SIMILAR dress to this Bette Davis dress from "All About Eve".  Does anyone know if it would be ok for me to make this dress (not identical) and sell it on ebay?  I really would like to know before I spend the money on material.  I'm not too interested in making this dress for myself.  I'm just curious if I could make a dress someone might want to buy.  Rather than make any random dress, I think making a movie dress might be something someone would search on ebay.  I don't want to get in trouble with copyright laws, which is why I'd like to know before buying the material.

 

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Lori

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14 minutes ago, Lori Ann said:

I asked this question to @_BetteDavis on Twitter, but no reply.  Maybe someone can help me here.  I looove making dresses for myself, and never made one for selling.  I'd like to try making a dress for selling.  And I'd like to try making a SIMILAR dress to this Bette Davis dress from "All About Eve".  Does anyone know if it would be ok for me to make this dress (not identical) and sell it on ebay?  I really would like to know before I spend the money on material.  I'm not too interested in making this dress for myself.  I'm just curious if I could make a dress someone might want to buy.  Rather than make any random dress, I think making a movie dress might be something someone would search on ebay.  I don't want to get in trouble with copyright laws, which is why I'd like to know before buying the material.

 

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Lori

You have no worries.    Dress designs are like food  recipes:  they  are not protected under trademark, patent, or copyright law.

Because clothing is a utilitarian item—something that people use—it cannot be copyrighted.

 

 

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32 minutes ago, Lori Ann said:

I asked this question to @_BetteDavis on Twitter, but no reply.  Maybe someone can help me here.  I looove making dresses for myself, and never made one for selling.  I'd like to try making a dress for selling.  And I'd like to try making a SIMILAR dress to this Bette Davis dress from "All About Eve".  Does anyone know if it would be ok for me to make this dress (not identical) and sell it on ebay?  I really would like to know before I spend the money on material.  I'm not too interested in making this dress for myself.  I'm just curious if I could make a dress someone might want to buy.  Rather than make any random dress, I think making a movie dress might be something someone would search on ebay.  I don't want to get in trouble with copyright laws, which is why I'd like to know before buying the material.

 

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Lori

 

If you want (possible) big bucks, need to make a replica.

Seems it is brown not black. :huh:

https://www.icollector.com/Bette-Davis-Owned-Replica-All-About-Eve-Dress_i7316328

7316328_1m.jpg?v=8C9D28FC5283C10

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It's a very common thing to find outfits/dresses that are direct copies of or are inspired by clothes in movies and TV.

Perhaps the most famous one is the "little black dress" by Givenchy from Breakfast at Tiffany's.

 

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That Edith Head gown (All About Eve) was a happy accident. The neckline was supposed to be higher up, but the dress was too big on Bette and hung down lower (no one measured her?) So with a little refitting Edith kept the design and its world famous now.

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

That Edith Head gown (All About Eve) was a happy accident. The neckline was supposed to be higher up, but the dress was too big on Bette and hung down lower (no one measured her?) So with a little refitting Edith kept the design and its world famous now.

I never noticed that it has fur cuffs and whatever you call those fur pieces hanging down from the waistline.  The color picture above drew my attention to that detail.  In the film, that detail kind of disappears (for me, anyway) as Margo sashays around her apartment.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

I never noticed that is has fur cuffs and whatever you call those fur pieces hanging down from the waistline.  The color picture above drew my attention to that detail.  In the film, that detail kind of disappears (for me, anyway) as Margo sashays around her apartment.

One needs that padding for the bumpy ride.   (starts at .29).

 

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1 hour ago, Lori Ann said:

Interesting.  I always thought the dress was black.  I was planning to make it in black velvet.

 

Lori

It appears you really like velvet.      I don't mean to be overly critical,   but is there much of a market for velvet dresses? 

To me it is the lease attractive fabric.   

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Personally, I love velvet & wear a lot of it. That "replica" dress is not exactly the same pieces as the original, which is why you can make anything you like & claim it as a "replica". There is no way you are going to be able to decipher every cut & line.

There are replica patterns available for very famous Hollywood costumes. I know someone who made the Wicked Witch's dress from Wizard Of Oz. It was amazing to see all the elements & how it fit a body in person. Remember-the camera ALWAYS lies. 

Check out vintage "Hollywood Patterns" which are readily available, you may find an actual pattern for this dress. Also smart buying small vintage mink fur pieces whenever seen in thrift shops for exactly this kind of re-purpose. Polyester fur just ruins the illusion.

s-l1600.jpg

I own a beautiful circa 1960 designer knock off of Liz Taylor's dress in CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF. It's beautifully cut & fitted and the crepe flows & drapes dramatically.  Unfortunately I don't fill it out the same as Liz.

cat-on-a-hot-tin-roof.jpg

It's very similar to Travilla's "Seven Year Itch" dress Marilyn wore, but that dress had strong pleating to create movement. The Helen Rose dress above is so light, it floats!

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14 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

It appears you really like velvet.      I don't mean to be overly critical,   but is there much of a market for velvet dresses? 

To me it is the lease attractive fabric.   

I love velvet!  It's beautiful & soft.  And there's something really nice about black velvet.  Very pretty.  I get my material from an ebay seller in California.  Sadly, she doesn't sell crushed velvet which I'd like for a future dress I have in mind.  I'm not sure about the market, since I never made a dress for selling.

 

Lori

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Personally, I love velvet & wear a lot of it. That "replica" dress is not exactly the same pieces as the original, which is why you can make anything you like & claim it as a "replica". There is no way you are going to be able to decipher every cut & line.

There are replica patterns available for very famous Hollywood costumes. I know someone who made the Wicked Witch's dress from Wizard Of Oz. It was amazing to see all the elements & how it fit a body in person. Remember-the camera ALWAYS lies. 

Check out vintage "Hollywood Patterns" which are readily available, you may find an actual pattern for this dress. Also smart buying small vintage mink fur pieces whenever seen in thrift shops for exactly this kind of re-purpose. Polyester fur just ruins the illusion.

s-l1600.jpg

I own a beautiful circa 1960 designer knock off of Liz Taylor's dress in CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF. It's beautifully cut & fitted and the crepe flows & drapes dramatically.  Unfortunately I don't fill it out the same as Liz.

cat-on-a-hot-tin-roof.jpg

It's very similar to Travilla's "Seven Year Itch" dress Marilyn wore, but that dress had strong pleating to create movement. The Helen Rose dress above is so light, it floats!

I never saw patterns for Hollywood dresses.  Very interesting!  Most of my recent dresses have been made without a pattern.  Ah, Helen Rose!  I love her designs!!  I love Irene also!

 

Lori

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5 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I love velvet!  It's beautiful & soft.  And there's something really nice about black velvet.  Very pretty.  I get my material from an ebay seller in California.  Sadly, she doesn't sell crushed velvet which I'd like for a future dress I have in mind.  I'm not sure about the market, since I never made a dress for selling.

 

Lori

Isn't velvet difficult to pleat?     E.g.  like the dress Liz is wearing above or even the Bette Davis dress from Eve?     

Or to get a layered look?

 

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Isn't velvet difficult to pleat?     E.g.  like the dress Liz is wearing above or even the Bette Davis dress from Eve?     

Or to get a layered look?

 

Yes, velvet is not easy to pleat.  I place velvet in the medium to thick materials.  I love the velvet I buy from ebay.  It has a stretch to it.  As I said in my original post, I'm not planning to make an exact duplicate of the Bette Davis dress.  I just want to make somewhat similar.  Do it my way.

 

Lori

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15 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I just want to make somewhat similar.  Do it my way.

 

Customized fitting. It is Hollywood's biggest secret*. Even Brad Pitt's white undershirts & ratty jeans have been professionally tailored to flatter his physique.

*Second biggest secret is hair is often "volumized" from an unseen angle. Every professional photographer will tell you "the camera always lies".

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On 10/8/2020 at 7:16 PM, Lori Ann said:

Interesting.  I always thought the dress was black.  I was planning to make it in black velvet.

 

Lori

I'm not big on fashion, but I know what I like ( ;) )  .  And I'd say I can't think of anyone with any ounce of self respect or taste who would want to buy, let alone wear such a train wreck(aka: "happy accident"  :rolleyes: )

Sepiatone

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2 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I'm not big on fashion, but I know what I like ( ;) )  .  And I'd say I can't think of anyone with any ounce of self respect or taste who would want to buy, let alone wear such a train wreck(aka: "happy accident"  :rolleyes: )

Sepiatone

It's a pretty dress.  Even for a 1950 film.  I'm not sure what year the film takes place though.  I've only seen parts of it.  But someone might want it for a future TCM festival, or a TCM cruise, or a Halloween costume.  A big collector of anything related to Bette Davis or "All About Eve" might find it interesting to own.

 

Lori

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On 10/8/2020 at 8:16 PM, jamesjazzguitar said:

It appears you really like velvet.      I don't mean to be overly critical,   but is there much of a market for velvet dresses? 

To me it is the lease attractive fabric.   

You mean the least attractive to lease?

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On 10/9/2020 at 7:17 AM, TikiSoo said:

Personally, I love velvet & wear a lot of it. That "replica" dress is not exactly the same pieces as the original, which is why you can make anything you like & claim it as a "replica". There is no way you are going to be able to decipher every cut & line.

There are replica patterns available for very famous Hollywood costumes. I know someone who made the Wicked Witch's dress from Wizard Of Oz. It was amazing to see all the elements & how it fit a body in person. Remember-the camera ALWAYS lies. 

Check out vintage "Hollywood Patterns" which are readily available, you may find an actual pattern for this dress. Also smart buying small vintage mink fur pieces whenever seen in thrift shops for exactly this kind of re-purpose. Polyester fur just ruins the illusion.

s-l1600.jpg

I own a beautiful circa 1960 designer knock off of Liz Taylor's dress in CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF. It's beautifully cut & fitted and the crepe flows & drapes dramatically.  Unfortunately I don't fill it out the same as Liz.

cat-on-a-hot-tin-roof.jpg

It's very similar to Travilla's "Seven Year Itch" dress Marilyn wore, but that dress had strong pleating to create movement. The Helen Rose dress above is so light, it floats!

Betty Grable first wore this style of dress with the "strong pleating" in 1951's Meet Me After the Show.  I think it may have been yellow.

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On 10/9/2020 at 11:25 AM, Lori Ann said:

I never saw patterns for Hollywood dresses.  Very interesting!  Most of my recent dresses have been made without a pattern.  Ah, Helen Rose!  I love her designs!!  I love Irene also!

 

Lori

I’m very fond of wardrobe designed by Bill Thomas. Are you familiar with him? 

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1 hour ago, HelenBaby2 said:

I’m very fond of wardrobe designed by Bill Thomas. Are you familiar with him? 

Yes, I know a few of his film costume designs.

 

Lori

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23 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

It's a pretty dress.  Even for a 1950 film.  I'm not sure what year the film takes place though.  I've only seen parts of it.  But someone might want it for a future TCM festival, or a TCM cruise, or a Halloween costume.  A big collector of anything related to Bette Davis or "All About Eve" might find it interesting to own.

 

Lori

Yeah, I'll buy that.  ;) EVrybody tries to look scary on Halloween.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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On 10/10/2020 at 11:20 AM, Lori Ann said:

someone might want it for a future TCM festival, or a TCM cruise, or a Halloween costume.

I was once Baby Jane for Halloween, a very easy costume/wig/make up to replicate.

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