Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Several months ago I recorded "Vertigo" to watch.  It was my first time seeing it.  I don't remember what channel I taped it on, but it had commercials.  I looove James Stewart!  I'm also a big Hitchcock fan.  I understood the film up to the end.  Then I got confused.  Well, it's gonna be on TCM next week.  I'm thinking to record it again & give it a second try.  Maybe without commercials I'll understand it.  Was anyone else confused?

Vertigo hits the dizzy heights as critics name it best film of all time |  The Independent | The Independent

Lori

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, slaytonf said:

I could offer you my take, but maybe it would be best to see the movie again first.

That's more or less MY spin too.  I never liked it much, but that shouldn't have anything to do with how YOU regard it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is definitely not one of my favorite Hitchcocks.  It's fine and there are parts I like, but it's not one that I return to over and over like Rear Window.  I do like Vertigo much more than Marnie, however.  It took me seeing Vertigo in the theater for me to finally put all the pieces together. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

Whatever it is, VERTIGO is a movie you want to see again or not.  I love it...  and hate it.  That one is special with a gorgeous score by BERNARD HERRMANN

His scores are fantastic!!!  He scored 7 Hitchcock films!  My favorite is "North by Northwest".  I love that score!  I heard it on a Disney bus once!

Lori

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vertigo is one of my favourite Hitchcock films, not for the logic of its story (and there are plenty of holes in this story line) but for its tale about obsession.

It's genuinely disturbing to see James Stewart, he of the formerly wholesome screen persona, delving deep, as he did in many of his roles in the '50s, to find a darker place in a character to portray. Vertigo's ending remains haunting, as a film with a dream-like quality, enhanced so much by Bernard Herrmann's musical score, ends as a nightmare.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

This is definitely not one of my favorite Hitchcocks.  It's fine and there are parts I like, but it's not one that I return to over and over like Rear Window.  I do like Vertigo much more than Marnie, however.  It took me seeing Vertigo in the theater for me to finally put all the pieces together. 

I saw "Rear Window" once & loved it.  It's gonna be on TCM next month.  Looking forward to seeing it again.  I saw part of "Marnie".  "The 39 Steps" and "Sabotage" were kinda dull.  I can always watch "Strangers on a Train" over & over.  Same for "North by Northwest" and "Rope".  "Saboteur" and "Suspicion" are very good also.

Lori

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Lori Ann said:

I saw "Rear Window" once & loved it.  It's gonna be on TCM next month.  Looking forward to seeing it again.  I saw part of "Marnie".  "The 39 Steps" and "Sabotage" were kinda dull.  I can always watch "Strangers on a Train" over & over.  Same for "North by Northwest" and "Rope".  "Saboteur" and "Suspicion" are very good also.

Lori

I love The 39 Steps.  The Lady Vanishes is another of the Hitchcock films made prior to his first Hollywood film (Rebecca) and it's also fantastic.

Rear Window is my favorite Hitchcock, I've seen it at least a dozen times.  I also enjoy Strangers on a Train.  After 'Window,' I love Psycho and The Birds.  I also enjoyed Spellbound, Rebecca, Foreign Correspondent, and To Catch a Thief

I don't like Marnie because of what Sean Connery's character does to Marnie. It puts me off the whole rest of the film. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

His scores are fantastic!!!  He scored 7 Hitchcock films!  My favorite is "North by Northwest".  I love that score!  I heard it on a Disney bus once!

Lori

Bernard Hermann re-used pieces of his score from On Dangerous Ground (with Robert Ryan and Ida Lupino) for North By Northwest

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

I saw "Rear Window" once & loved it.  It's gonna be on TCM next month.  Looking forward to seeing it again.  I saw part of "Marnie".  "The 39 Steps" and "Sabotage" were kinda dull.  I can always watch "Strangers on a Train" over & over.  Same for "North by Northwest" and "Rope".  "Saboteur" and "Suspicion" are very good also.

Lori

Lori, I read in the other thread you like Doris Day. If you haven't seen Hitchcock's remake of his The Man Who Knew Too Much with Doris and James Stewart highly recommend watching that one. TCM does show it every so often. Great film. btw, I love Vertigo, I'm sure if you rewatch it you'll understand the ending. 
Rear Window is also my favorite Hitchcock, I'd be hard pressed to think of one I didn't like, although cannot watch Psycho. First saw it in a theater, unfortunately I was under 10 when I saw it and that probably has a lot to do with why I can't watch that film.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I, too, am a HUGE Hitchcock fan.  Perhaps after you’ve seen the movie again – or before if you want – check out the following commentaries:

How Hitchcock blocks a scene- using Vertigo as the example – There are other good You Tube videos on Vertigo – this is just a sample

 

Vertigo – Ending explained

 

Film-makers comment on Vertigo

 

Hitchcock remembered by screenwriter Samuel Taylor

 

Influence of Vertigo

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Psycho is probably Hitchcock's most celebrated film, certainly his most famous, and it had a great influence, of course, on slasher films to come. Well crafted as it may be,  though, it's a difficult film for me to really enjoy because of its darkness.

Many of my favourite Hitchcocks are those done with a light touch, the last of them being North By Northwest.

Being, essentially, a psychological study with the superficial trappings of a mystery, Vertigo is not a light hearted film and it puzzled many critics and viewers at the time of its release, failing to be the hit its director desired it to be. Hitchcock, rather ungraciously, blamed James Stewart for part of the film's failure, deciding the actor had been too old for his role. Hitchcock created a great film, in my opinion, though I am less impressed by his criticism of Stewart, especially since I regard his dark portrait as Scotty to be one of the most startling and impressive of his career. Casting this actor against type was a brilliant move.

 

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to give any spoilers away but one thing I liked is that Hitchcock didn't play me for a fool (re: Kim Novak's character).  There is also a great moment where Barbara Bel Geddes paints a particular portrait.  And the finale reflects Hitchcock's supposed hatred of Catholic school.  Rather ironic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rear Window is not only my favorite Hitchcock mystery, but also my fourth favorite film of all time.  Having said that, I think James Stewart was robbed of an Oscar nod for Vertigo.  In my opinion, it was the Best Actor's performance of 1958.  I own both movies on Blu-ray and watch each once a year. 

Other Hitchcock films that are favorites include Strangers on a Train, North By Northwest, Psycho, Rebecca.  In fact, I've never seen one of his movies I haven't liked.

His daughter Pat wrote that  putting Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant together in an espionage story set in post WW2 South America complete with Nazi spies along with an exciting climax made Notorious her personal favorite.   She also revealed that Hitch's favorite was Shadow of a Doubt set in Santa Rosa, CA.  He loved the fact that a small town could have the Merry Widow killer living amongst them as they enjoyed his company.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Psycho is probably Hitchcock's most celebrated film, certainly his most famous, and it had a great influence, of course, on slasher films to come. Well crafted as it may be,  though, it's a difficult film for me to really enjoy because of its darkness.

Many of my favourite Hitchcocks are those done with a light touch, the last of them being North By Northwest.

Being, essentially, a psychological study with the superficial trappings of a mystery, Vertigo is not a light hearted film and it puzzled many critics and viewers at the time of its release, failing to be the hit its director desired it to be. Hitchcock, rather ungraciously, blamed James Stewart for part of the film's failure, deciding the actor had been too old for his role. Hitchcock created a great film, in my opinion, though I am less impressed by his criticism of Stewart, especially since I regard his dark portrait as Scotty to be one of the most startling and impressive of his career. Casting this actor against type was a brilliant move.

 

Somewhere in the past I've read that while filming Vertigo Hitchcock was talking to Stewart about starring in North By Northwest.  When Vertigo wasn't the expected hit, Hitchcock decided that maybe it was because Stewart looked too old for not only the role of Scotty Ferguson, but also for Roger Thornhill.  Enter Cary Grant who was 4 years older than James Stewart.  Personally, I'm glad Stewart was cast in Vertigo, and equally glad Grant was cast in North By Northwest.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

When Kim Novak made an appearance at TIFF five years ago she said that (SPOILER ALERT FOR THOSE WHO HAVEN'T SEEN VERTIGO) she identified with the two roles she played in the film. She connected with Madeleine as an artificially created image but, perhaps even more so, with Judy, as a person who wanted to be loved for just being herself.

The emotional vulnerability that Stewart and Novak both bring to the film's final scene (she honest with him for the first time in the film) adds to the devastating irony of what is about to happen to them.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like this is turning into a Hitchcock thread. Which is just fine - who doesn't like Hitch?

Many things to say about "Vertigo", but right now I'll settle for the music.  This soundtrack  by Hitchcock stalwart Bernard Herrmann has to be one of the most evocative, memorable themes in all filmdom.  It has such a mysterious, yearning quality.  It really captures the whole feeling of the film - which is, of course, mysterious and yearning.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

some poll

"Some poll" is probably the Sight & Sound international critics survey, which first appeared in 1952, wherein the British magazine Sight & Sound got film critics worldwide to list what they thought were the 10 greatest films of all time, and they've been doing this every 10 years ever since. The Bicycle Thief placed first that very first year, but then Citizen Kane won every time until, I think 2012 (2002?) when it dropped to second behind Vertigo. If people are still alive then, there will be another list in two years.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Lori, I read in the other thread you like Doris Day. If you haven't seen Hitchcock's remake of his The Man Who Knew Too Much with Doris and James Stewart highly recommend watching that one. TCM does show it every so often. Great film. btw, I love Vertigo, I'm sure if you rewatch it you'll understand the ending. 
Rear Window is also my favorite Hitchcock, I'd be hard pressed to think of one I didn't like, although cannot watch Psycho. First saw it in a theater, unfortunately I was under 10 when I saw it and that probably has a lot to do with why I can't watch that film.

I haven't yet seen "The Man Who Knew Too Much".  It's gonna be on TCM next month.  I can't wait to finally see it!!!  My 2 favorite actors in one film!

Lori

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Psycho is probably Hitchcock's most celebrated film, certainly his most famous, and it had a great influence, of course, on slasher films to come. Well crafted as it may be,  though, it's a difficult film for me to really enjoy because of its darkness.

Many of my favourite Hitchcocks are those done with a light touch, the last of them being North By Northwest.

Being, essentially, a psychological study with the superficial trappings of a mystery, Vertigo is not a light hearted film and it puzzled many critics and viewers at the time of its release, failing to be the hit its director desired it to be. Hitchcock, rather ungraciously, blamed James Stewart for part of the film's failure, deciding the actor had been too old for his role. Hitchcock created a great film, in my opinion, though I am less impressed by his criticism of Stewart, especially since I regard his dark portrait as Scotty to be one of the most startling and impressive of his career. Casting this actor against type was a brilliant move.

 

I thought James Stewart did a great job.  I just got lost near the end.  I was enjoying it (and understanding it) up until the end.

Lori

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always liked the fact that Elster got away with it, at least in the American version. He was

kind of creepy and arrogant, but it's nice to see a smart villain getting a break once in a while.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I always liked the fact that Elster got away with it, at least in the American version. He was

kind of creepy and arrogant, but it's nice to see a smart villain getting a break once in a while.

Yeh but the audience doesn't even really care about what happens to Elster. Scotty and Madeleine/Judy are the primary concerns of the film. Elster is just an after thought.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...