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21 minutes ago, TopBilled said:

Thanks. I see the films are listed by Eastern time zone.

I like how you've listed the themes.

Good job!

You're welcome.  It's all there to begin with though, I'm just going the last mile and dumping it to a user-friendly web page.  I thought some semblance of normalcy might be good.

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4 minutes ago, MovieCollectorOH said:

You're welcome.  It's all there to begin with though, I'm just going the last mile and dumping it to a user-friendly web page.  I thought some semblance of normalcy might be good.

I assume you'll be adding in the missing themes as they become known.

***

I'm pleased to see Miriam Hopkins being honored. Long overdue!

Screen Shot 2020-11-07 at 6.34.26 AM

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Yes and they are showing These Three and the Children's Hour which is essentially the same story, about school girls who lie on their teachers. Miriam plays one of the teachers in the 1930 version and she plays the talented Shirley McClain's aunt in the 1960 version. 

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1 hour ago, Oneeyeopen said:

Yes and they are showing These Three and the Children's Hour which is essentially the same story, about school girls who lie on their teachers. Miriam plays one of the teachers in the 1930 version and she plays the talented Shirley McClain's aunt in the 1960 version. 

Miriam was a favorite of director William Wyler. He directed her in THESE THREE (1936) and later rehired her for a supporting role in the remake THE CHILDREN'S HOUR (1961), which he directed as well.

He also directed her in THE HEIRESS (1949) and CARRIE (1952).

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

I assume you'll be adding in the missing themes as they become known.

***

I'm pleased to see Miriam Hopkins being honored. Long overdue!

Screen Shot 2020-11-07 at 6.34.26 AM

Yes,  this is a great selection.     Yea,  no Temple Drake (I saw your other thread),   but still a solid set of films for the month.

 

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Daytime New Year's Day appears to be all screwball comedies:

Twentieth Century (John Barrymore, Carole Lombard) (Columbia, 1934)
A Night at the Opera (The Marx Brothers) (MGM, 1935)
The Awful Truth (Cary Grant, Irene Dunn) (Columbia, 1937)
Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday, William Holden) (Columbia, 1950)
Lover Come Back (Doris Day, Tony Randall) (Universal, 1961)
The Fortune Cookie (Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau) (United Artists, 1966)
The Producers (Zero Mostel, Gene Wilder) (Embassy, 1967)

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I was struggling to figure out the primetime theme for New Year's Day, until I realized MCOH was inserting his guess. And yes indeed, these movies are all about "fresh starts", moving to a new locale or otherwise starting over.

It's a Gift (W.C. Fields, Kathleen Howard) (Universal, 1934)
Please Don't Eat the Daisies (Doris Day, David Niven) (MGM, 1960)
The Sundowners (Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum) (Warner Bros., 1960)
The Big Chill (Tom Berenger, Glenn Close) (Columbia, 1983)
Murphy's Romance (Sally Field, James Garner) (Columbia, 1985)

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42 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Daytime New Year's Day appears to be all screwball comedies:

Twentieth Century (John Barrymore, Carole Lombard) (Columbia, 1934)
A Night at the Opera (The Marx Brothers) (MGM, 1935)
The Awful Truth (Cary Grant, Irene Dunn) (Columbia, 1937)
Born Yesterday (Judy Holliday, William Holden) (Columbia, 1950)
Lover Come Back (Doris Day, Tony Randall) (Universal, 1961)
The Fortune Cookie (Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau) (United Artists, 1966)
The Producers (Zero Mostel, Gene Wilder) (Embassy, 1967)

TCM should have included It's Love I'm After with Leslie Howard, Bette Davis,  and Olivia DeHavilland.    It is set on New Years eve \ day and for me one of the top 5 screwball comedies of the 30s.

It's Love I'm After (Film) - TV Tropes

 

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Happy to see Yvonne De Carlo getting a primetime spotlight on January 25th.

***

CRISS CROSS (1949)

Screen Shot 2019-12-14 at 6.50.47 AM.jpeg

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL (1956)

Screen Shot 2020-07-25 at 3.04.56 PM.jpeg

BAND OF ANGELS (1957)

Screen Shot 2020-07-25 at 3.32.26 PM

MUNSTER GO HOME! (1966)

screen-shot-2020-07-25-at-4.10.21-pm.jpeg

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6 hours ago, Oneeyeopen said:

Thank you so much!!!

Made my weekend.

I echo your words. I was all set for a rather dreary Saturday until I saw that the January schedule was up. Thanks once again to MovieCollectorOH. Suggest we nominate him for the Robert Osborne Award for services above and beyond!

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January 2 daytime is the usual Saturday hodgepodge.  I'm not sure if there is a theme. There are several shorts, Anyway, here are all the features being shown.

Treasure Island (Wallace Beery, Jackie Cooper) (MGM, 1934)
Bulldog Drummond Comes Back (John Barrymore, John Howard) (Paramount, 1937)
The Girl from Mexico (Lupe Velez, Donald Woods) (RKO, 1937)
Reunion in France (Joan Crawford, John Wayne) (MGM, 1942)
The Story of G.I. Joe (Burgess Meredith, Robert Mitchum) (United Artists, 1945)
Lawrence of Arabia (Peter O'Toole, Omar Sharif) (Columbia, 1962) 

 

 

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MCOH says the primetime theme for January 2 is "Flower Power". It's a bit of a tenuous connection, but they've linked a rerun of a Brad Bird Essential with a Hitchcock classic because both films feature flowers.

City Lights (Charles Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill) (United Artists, 1931)
Vertigo (James Stewart, Kim Novak) (Paramount, 1958)

Then, it's time for Noir Alley:
The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry (George Sanders, Geraldine Fitzgerald) (Universal, 1945)

The overnight movies are connected by having the word "Winter" in their titles:
If Winter Comes (Walter Pidgeon, Deborah Kerr) (MGM, 1947)
Winter Meeting (Bette Davis, Janis Page) (Warner Bros., 1948)

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January 3 Daytime

We begin with two movies that might be linked by the theme of obsessive love:
The Blue Angel (Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings) (Paramount, 1930)
The Private Lives of Elizabeth & Essex (Bette Davis, Errol Flynn,) (Warner Bros., 1939)

Then a re-run of last night's Noir Alley.

I believe Sunday daytime programming has traditionally not required any connecting theme, and I don't think there is any.

Lydia (Merle Oberson, Joseph Cotten) (United Artists, 1941)
Friendly Persuasion (Gary Cooper, Dorothy McGuire) (Allied Artists, 1956)
The Miracle Worker (Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke) (United Artists, 1962)
A Little Romance (Laurence Olivier, Diane Lane) (Orion, 1979)

 

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34 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

MCOH says the primetime theme for January 2 is "Flower Power". It's a bit of a tenuous connection, but they've linked a rerun of a Brad Bird Essential with a Hitchcock classic because both films feature flowers.

City Lights (Charles Chaplin, Virginia Cherrill) (United Artists, 1931)
Vertigo (James Stewart, Kim Novak) (Paramount, 1958)

Then, it's time for Noir Alley:
The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry (George Sanders, Geraldine Fitzgerald) (Universal, 1945)

The overnight movies are connected by having the word "Winter" in their titles:
If Winter Comes (Walter Pidgeon, Deborah Kerr) (MGM, 1947)
Winter Meeting (Bette Davis, Janis Page) (Warner Bros., 1948)

CHAPLIN'S CITY LIGHTS is almost a tie to his 1936 MODERN TIMES &both must rank among HOLLYWOODS TOP TEN BEST FILMS EVER MADE YET! & of course his peers at the ACADEMY snubbed both, theory is because CHARLIE didn't switch to full sound yet?

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5 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

January 3 Daytime

We begin with two movies that might be linked by the theme of obsessive love:
The Blue Angel (Marlene Dietrich, Emil Jannings) (Paramount, 1930)
The Private Lives of Elizabeth & Essex (Bette Davis, Errol Flynn,) (Warner Bros., 1939)

Then a re-run of last night's Noir Alley.

I believe Sunday daytime programming has traditionally not required any connecting theme, and I don't think there is any.

Lydia (Merle Oberson, Joseph Cotten) (United Artists, 1941)
Friendly Persuasion (Gary Cooper, Dorothy McGuire) (Allied Artists, 1956)
The Miracle Worker (Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke) (United Artists, 1962)
A Little Romance (Laurence Olivier, Diane Lane) (Orion, 1979)

 

1979 Oscar victor for Best Score LITTLE ROMANCE was among RON HOWARD'S top flix for that great cinematic year!

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Happy to see Yvonne De Carlo getting a primetime spotlight on January 25th.

***

CRISS CROSS (1949)

Screen Shot 2019-12-14 at 6.50.47 AM.jpeg

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL (1956)

Screen Shot 2020-07-25 at 3.04.56 PM.jpeg

BAND OF ANGELS (1957)

Screen Shot 2020-07-25 at 3.32.26 PM

MUNSTER GO HOME! (1966)

screen-shot-2020-07-25-at-4.10.21-pm.jpeg

Who also preferred THE MUNSTERS to THE ADDAM'S FAMILY?

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5 minutes ago, spence said:

1979 Oscar victor for Best Score LITTLE ROMANCE was among RON HOWARD'S top flix for that great cinematic year!

1979 at the age of 15 or so was the year that put the hook in me for the first time & I became 100% not only a movie lover, but a collector as well   But first i wanted to see why so many including the likes of tv hosts MIKE DOUGLAS, MERV GRIFFIN & others would cal;l KANE the greatest & ALWAYS refer to SPENCE as THE GREAT SPENCER TRACY

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