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The triumph of President Joe Biden and healing the nation


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1 hour ago, NipkowDisc said:

but what I find offensive is her thinking there are hordes of white guys just seething with hatred because she is a VP-Elect.

Can you honestly say you are not one of the white guys she is referring to?

If I'm mistaken you have my sincere apology.     Really,  no joke here,   but it is very hard to tell with you.    

But if you're really saying something along the lines  of "can't we all just get along",  I'm willing and my gut tells me so is Harris

  

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Can you honestly say you are not one of the white guys she is referring to?

If I'm mistaken you have my sincere apology.     Really,  no joke here,   but it is very hard to tell with you.    

But if you're really saying something along the lines  of "can't we all just get along",  I'm willing and my gut tells me so is Harris

  

 

Man, what a GREAT and insightful question to ask Nip here, James!

And now if ONLY he'd actually CONTEMPTLATE the reason for you asking it and THEN begin a little self-examinaming scearch deep in his soul in order to find the true and correct answer to it.

(...however I'm sorry to say, the chances of this happening are about as  good as Donald Trump still finding his fat butt in the White House after January 20, 2021)

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Today's article:

Bush congratulates Biden, says election was 'fundamentally fair' and 'its outcome is clear'

By Eric Bradner, CNN  7 hrs ago
 

Former President George W. Bush congratulated President-elect Joe Biden in a phone call Sunday and said that, while President Donald Trump has the right to pursue legal challenges and recounts, the 2020 race was "fundamentally fair" and "its outcome is clear."

The gesture by Bush, the only living former Republican president, was a break from his party's outgoing president, Trump, who has so far refused to concede the race. In the statement, Bush said he had called Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on Sunday.

"Though we have political differences, I know Joe Biden to be a good man, who has won his opportunity to lead and unify our country," Bush said. "The President-elect reiterated that while he ran as a Democrat, he will govern for all Americans. I offered him the same thing I offered Presidents Trump and Obama: my prayers for his success, and my pledge to help in any way I can."

Bush also offered congratulations in the statement to Trump "on a hard-fought campaign," nodding to his "extraordinary political achievement" of winning the votes of more than 70 million Americans, the second-most in history behind Biden. "They have spoken, and their voices will continue to be heard through elected Republicans at every level of government," Bush said.

Bush in 2000 was elected by a much smaller margin than Biden, with his race against Democratic then-Vice President Al Gore coming down to 537 votes in Florida and a Supreme Court decision in December. He said Trump "has the right to request recounts and pursue legal challenges," but said Biden's win was clear.

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This article discusses Biden's religion, as well as the religion of Kamala Harris:

Biden to become only the second Catholic president

Caitlin O'Kane  17 hrs ago

When President-elect Joe Biden assumes office in January, he will become only the second Catholic president in U.S. history, following John F. Kennedy. On Saturday, after Mr. Biden was projected winner of the presidential race, Catholics around the world reacted to the historic moment. 

During his victory speech Saturday night, Mr. Biden referenced his faith when he quoted the hymn "On Eagles' Wings," which he said meant a lot to his family, particularly his late son Beau who died of cancer in 2015. "It captures the faith that sustains me and which I believe sustains America," Biden said, before reciting some of the lyrics.

James J. Martin SJ, an American Jesuit priest who serves as a consultant to the Vatican's communications secretary, tweeted about the significance. 

"The surprise 'On Eagles' Wings' reference by @JoeBiden, which made my phone buzz like crazy, made me realize: this means four years of not only a Catholic president, but an injection of #Catholic culture into our national conversation in a way probably not seen since JFK," Martin wrote.

Martin also shared a screenshot showing "On Eagles' Wings" was trending on Twitter in the U.S.

Sr. Simone Campbell, an American Roman Catholic Religious Sister, lawyer and activist, also tweeted about Biden. "Congratulations to my friend, and our President-elect, Joseph R. Biden!" she wrote. "I look forward to working with you and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris to create a more perfect union."

"Glad that our nation has picked @JoeBiden and @KamalaHarris to lead us into a new chapter," Campbell's tweet continued.

Archbishop José H. Gomez, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops also issued a statement on the election.

"I believe that at this moment in American history, Catholics have a special duty to be peacemakers, to promote fraternity and mutual trust, and to pray for a renewed spirit of true patriotism in our country," Gomez said in the statement. 

"Democracy requires that all of us conduct ourselves as people of virtue and self-discipline. It requires that we respect the free expression of opinions and that we treat one another with charity and civility, even as we might disagree deeply in our debates on matters of law and public policy," he continued. 

"As we do this, we recognize that Joseph R. Biden, Jr., has received enough votes to be elected the 46th President of the United States. We congratulate Mr. Biden and acknowledge that he joins the late President John F. Kennedy as the second United States president to profess the Catholic faith. We also congratulate Sen. Kamala D. Harris of California, who becomes the first woman ever elected as vice president."

On Election Day, Mr. Biden, a devout Catholic, started out by attending Mass and visiting the graves of his son, Beau, and his first wife Neilia and infant daughter Naomi, who were both killed in a car crash in 1972.

On Sunday, Mr. Biden did the same, attending Mass with his daughter Ashley and grandson Hunter at St. Joseph on the Brandywine Catholic Church in Wilmington, Delaware, and then visiting his family members' graves. 

Mr. Biden's Catholic faith caused few ripples on the campaign trail, in stark contrast to the attention that surrounded John F. Kennedy's religion when he ran for president in 1960. At the time, many Protestants were suspicious about whether Kennedy might place loyalty to the Vatican over U.S. interests, and he gave a widely reported speech reassuring Americans, "I believe in a president whose religious views are his own private affair, neither imposed by him upon the nation, or imposed by the nation upon him as a condition to holding that office."

The Pew Research Center notes that while Catholicism "has long been the nation's largest religious denomination," only two other Catholics — Democrats Al Smith in 1928 and John Kerry in 2004 — have ever been major party presidential nominees.

Mr. Biden's running mate, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris considers herself a Baptist but also grew up with exposure to her mother's Hindu traditions, and her husband, Douglas Emhoff, is Jewish. 

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

This article discusses Biden's religion, as well as the religion of Kamala Harris:

Biden to become only the second Catholic president

Caitlin O'Kane  17 hrs ago

When President-elect Joe Biden assumes office in January, he will become only the second Catholic president in U.S. history, following John F. Kennedy. On Saturday, after Mr. Biden was projected winner of the presidential race, Catholics around the world reacted to the historic moment. 

 

Wonder like JFK, will Biden give a speech.... Before this decade is out to put a man on Mars and return him safely to the Earth? ;)

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2 hours ago, hamradio said:

Wonder like JFK, will Biden give a speech.... Before this decade is out to put a man on Mars and return him safely to the Earth? ;)

Number 1 fundamentally on Biden's plate is to make sure that all Americans are given equal opportunity:

At The Ballot Box

For Justice

In Education

At Work

And always important--

in their everyday lives.

 

No American demographic should be treated better or have privilege over in other demographic or groups of Americans.

No American is above the law.

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30 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

Number 1 fundamentally on Biden's plate is to make sure that all Americans are given equal opportunity:

At The Ballot Box

For Justice

In Education

At Work

And always important--

in their everyday lives.

 

No American demographic should be treated better or have privilege over in other demographic or groups of Americans.

No American is above the law.

Number one as he has said, is to control COVID-19.

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6 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Number one as he has said, is to control COVID-19.

Do you believe the Federal government should impose on state governments with regards to controls on Covid-19?  

I'm on the fence about that.      It might not even be constitutional and if a case went to the SC,  I assume they would rule it wasn't.

Maybe the Biden admin should do something similar to the 55 MPH speed limit were the Feds didn't have the authority to impose that on state highways;  I.e. any Covid-19 stimulus money is withheld from states that don't mandate certain policies.    (which was what the Feds did to get states to adopt the 55 MPH speed limit).

If the Feds can't impose mandates,  I would like a travel ban on those states that don't play-ball.   I.e.  no one can leave the state,  period.    (but that would likely violate the commence clause)

 

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18 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

If the Feds can't impose mandates,  I would like a travel ban on those states that don't play-ball.   I.e.  no one can leave the state,  period.    (but that would likely violate the commence clause)

I can't imagine how that would work...maybe for airlines, but every road that crosses a state line?  

The only way I can see it working is:  everything except essential businesses everywhere close...people will get $ from the fed (and no more of this sending the dough to corporate fat cats)..in fact, businesses shouldn't get paid...their owners and workers will receive $ that will keep them afloat individually; lot of money? yeah, but nothing compared to corporate welfare, or over funding the military just to keep boeing or lockheed happy.  People in groups w/o masks should be dealt with like somebody walking around with a tube of anthrax...a threat to the community.

I know all this could never be enforceable, but I don't know the cure for selfish, ignorant people who don't care about anyone else and don't see the long term ramifications of all this.

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2 minutes ago, shutoo said:

I can't imagine how that would work...maybe for airlines, but every road that crosses a state line?  

The only way I can see it working is:  everything except essential businesses everywhere close...people will get $ from the fed (and no more of this sending the dough to corporate fat cats)..in fact, businesses shouldn't get paid...their owners and workers will receive $ that will keep them afloat individually; lot of money? yeah, but nothing compared to corporate welfare, or over funding the military just to keep boeing or lockheed happy.  People in groups w/o masks should be dealt with like somebody walking around with a tube of anthrax...a threat to the community.

I know all this could never be enforceable, but I don't know the cure for selfish, ignorant people who don't care about anyone else and don't see the long term ramifications of all this.

Yea,  what I mentioned is a crazy idea but as you say;  " I don't know the cure for selfish, ignorant people who don't care about anyone else".

Related to "couldn't be enforced anyhow":  Note that CA has a strict bring-guns-to-CA policy.   I.e. there are all sorts of restrictions,  like one has to ship the gun to a gun dealer in CA,  and after the gun dealer ensures all CA laws have been followed (e.g. background checks,  the gun isn't an assault weapon that is banned in CA,  waiting period, etc..) they can pick it up at the dealer.     

But due to logistics it is easy to just drive into CA with one's guns and most of the time only 'after the fact' is someone found to violate the CA policy (e.g. have an illegal gun or one that was never registered).      There is a border check-point on major freeways,  but they care more about bringing in illegal plants and fruits than guns.  

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Do you believe the Federal government should impose on state governments with regards to controls on Covid-19?  

Not really sure how Biden plans to do this.  During the campaign and afterwards he said he was going to work with the governors - good luck with that in red states.  I think he will try whatever options (limited though they may be) to do what he can.  Then get the federal government to clearly present Covid as a pandemic and that people and governments need to take the advice of his CDC.

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Today at work some documents crossed my desk involving a case I have been investigating. These were court orders and one of the signatures on the main document belonged to Kamala Harris. It was from 2014 when she was the Attorney General in Sacramento.

I just thought that was interesting. 

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This article caught my eye. (I found it on businessinsider.com) The interview below was conducted last Friday, before Biden declared victory:

Former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger reveals his hopes for the next president: 'I like Joe Biden'

To this day, Henry Kissinger is the most famous Secretary of State the US has seen.

Born in Fürth in 1923, Kissinger is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and has acted as a foreign policy advisor to all US-presidents since John F. Kennedy.

On Friday, he spoke from New York with CEO of Axel Springer SE Mathias Döpfner to mark the end of the WELT Economic Summit in Paris.

Politicians and entrepreneurs from all over the globe joined in the conversation — from Capgemini's CEO Aiman Ezzat and the CEO of Polish airline LOT Rafal Milczarski to CEO of Rewe Group Lionel Souque and the Editor-in-Chief and Managing Director of WELT Group, Ulf Poschardt.

Carried out on Friday, Joe Biden was the likely winner of the presidency at the time of this interview but his victory hadn't yet been officially confirmed.

Speaking with Mathias Döpfner, Kissinger revealed what he expected from the new president, the merits of the Trump administration, Realpolitik beyond hate, and his longing for harmony.

Mathias Döpfner: How will this election impact the American people? And what does it mean for Europe, for transatlantic relations?

Henry Kissinger: The most important question this election has brought about is how the next President — whoever that may be — is to succeed in creating cohesion among the American people. As it stands, the losing party will claim that there were either procedural disputes or legal ones — disputes that our system allows us to take to court. Whatever the eventual outcome, the overarching challenge for whichever is the next administration will be to create some degree of unity.

Döpfner: How can this be achieved when we find ourselves in a political climate where the two parties are more diametrically opposed than ever?

Kissinger: Two of the main challenges for the next president will be, firstly, to establish whether the decision-making process is working properly and, secondly, whether it's possible to put together an appropriately non-partisan cabinet.

Döpfner: How optimistic are you on that front?

Kissinger: I'm very hopeful this could be achieved in the near future. I've known Biden for decades. While I've disagreed with him on some political issues, he's not trigger-happy when it comes to decision-making. The fundamental problems the US has on its hands are getting on top of grievances it has on its own soil and accepting that the pressing issues it faces can't be resolved in the space of a single term. The American people will have to grapple with them indefinitely.

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3 hours ago, TopBilled said:

This article caught my eye. (I found it on businessinsider.com) The interview below was conducted last Friday, before Biden declared victory:

Former US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger reveals his hopes for the next president: 'I like Joe Biden'

To this day, Henry Kissinger is the most famous Secretary of State the US has seen.

Born in Fürth in 1923, Kissinger is a Nobel Peace Prize winner and has acted as a foreign policy advisor to all US-presidents since John F. Kennedy.

On Friday, he spoke from New York with CEO of Axel Springer SE Mathias Döpfner to mark the end of the WELT Economic Summit in Paris.

Politicians and entrepreneurs from all over the globe joined in the conversation — from Capgemini's CEO Aiman Ezzat and the CEO of Polish airline LOT Rafal Milczarski to CEO of Rewe Group Lionel Souque and the Editor-in-Chief and Managing Director of WELT Group, Ulf Poschardt.

Carried out on Friday, Joe Biden was the likely winner of the presidency at the time of this interview but his victory hadn't yet been officially confirmed.

Speaking with Mathias Döpfner, Kissinger revealed what he expected from the new president, the merits of the Trump administration, Realpolitik beyond hate, and his longing for harmony.

Mathias Döpfner: How will this election impact the American people? And what does it mean for Europe, for transatlantic relations?

Henry Kissinger: The most important question this election has brought about is how the next President — whoever that may be — is to succeed in creating cohesion among the American people. As it stands, the losing party will claim that there were either procedural disputes or legal ones — disputes that our system allows us to take to court. Whatever the eventual outcome, the overarching challenge for whichever is the next administration will be to create some degree of unity.

Döpfner: How can this be achieved when we find ourselves in a political climate where the two parties are more diametrically opposed than ever?

Kissinger: Two of the main challenges for the next president will be, firstly, to establish whether the decision-making process is working properly and, secondly, whether it's possible to put together an appropriately non-partisan cabinet.

Döpfner: How optimistic are you on that front?

Kissinger: I'm very hopeful this could be achieved in the near future. I've known Biden for decades. While I've disagreed with him on some political issues, he's not trigger-happy when it comes to decision-making. The fundamental problems the US has on its hands are getting on top of grievances it has on its own soil and accepting that the pressing issues it faces can't be resolved in the space of a single term. The American people will have to grapple with them indefinitely.

I am hopeful for Biden, but his major obstacle to success on far too many fronts will be Mitch McConnell.  With another six year term under his belt and more Republicans in the US House, he will consider that he has a mandate to stop everything Biden and/or Dems. want.

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18 hours ago, ElCid said:

Not really sure how Biden plans to do this.  During the campaign and afterwards he said he was going to work with the governors - good luck with that in red states.  I think he will try whatever options (limited though they may be) to do what he can.  Then get the federal government to clearly present Covid as a pandemic and that people and governments need to take the advice of his CDC.

State rights can be sacrosanct IMHO as long as they don't impose on other states' rights of put the rest of them and the nation in any kind of harmful danger.  For example, if one state, for whatever reason, chooses NOT to comply with federal government recommendations on Covid matters this likely puts other states and the nation at risk due to the impossibility and improbability of that state's ability to control interstate travel it's population might undergo.  Then I imagine, Biden, as president might have the authority to step in.  

Sepiatone

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17 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

State rights can be sacrosanct IMHO as long as they don't impose on other states' rights of put the rest of them and the nation in any kind of harmful danger.  For example, if one state, for whatever reason, chooses NOT to comply with federal government recommendations on Covid matters this likely puts other states and the nation at risk due to the impossibility and improbability of that state's ability to control interstate travel it's population might undergo.  Then I imagine, Biden, as president might have the authority to step in.  

Sepiatone

We'll see.

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7 hours ago, ElCid said:

I am hopeful for Biden, but his major obstacle to success on far too many fronts will be Mitch McConnell.  With another six year term under his belt and more Republicans in the US House, he will consider that he has a mandate to stop everything Biden and/or Dems. want.

I would caution against people making McConnell a new "foe" or "villain." The country won't heal if we're too busy trying to stage the next boxing match.

One of the reasons I had been decidedly apolitical most of my adult life is because in college I realized the American political system is horrendously two-dimensional. There are more than two sides to things but people are so ingrained to think good-bad, black-white and Republican-Democrat in our country. And our media plays into it. I honestly think it's because a large percentage of Americans are not college-educated, so our political process has a high school mentality. And I find that an impediment to our progress as a whole.

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  • TopBilled changed the title to The triumph of President Joe Biden and healing the nation

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