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Republican Voter Suppression


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40 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Depends on how one defines "registered";   E.g. there is motor voter registration,   where one is automatically registered to vote when they get their driver license.    

Anyhow;  of course the GOP efforts go far beyond the ONE example I mentioned.    I still believe most of these can be overcome,  mostly by showing up to vote on election day.

Also,   based on what I read most of these GOP efforts make it more difficult for older people to vote  (not just poor people that may move a lot or not have a car).    Hopefully many of these GOP efforts reduce voting by older white folks that vote GOP to offset the impact to poorer voters and \ or people-of-color.

Either way Stacy isn't going to give up and either am I.   I.e.  I'm donating  5K to her efforts.     

As for the Supreme Courts:   I believe they ruled correctly in that state representatives have wide powers related to a state's election laws.     

Your donation is commendable.  Let's hope it helps.

While it is true that many older white people (such as I) vote early or by mail, many Republican voters will go to the polls on election day if they have to.

Unfortunately the wide latitude states have in election laws and election administration has permitted far, far too much discrimination and suppression.  Just as when Supreme Court determined states could decide on how to run schools, restaurants, lodging, zoning,  public transportation and even who could vote at all.

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42 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Your donation is commendable.  Let's hope it helps.

While it is true that many older white people (such as I) vote early or by mail, many Republican voters will go to the polls on election day if they have to.

Unfortunately the wide latitude states have in election laws and election administration has permitted far, far too much discrimination and suppression.  Just as when Supreme Court determined states could decide on how to run schools, restaurants, lodging, zoning,  public transportation and even who could vote at all.

The Supreme Count is very likely to  overturn a state voting law that overly impacts (disenfranchise),  a certain segment of society.    But that isn't the case with mail in voting based on your own example that older voter  "will go to the polls on election day if they have to".       I.e.  the Dem lawyers would have to show that people-of-color (or some other segment of voters) need to use mail in voting more so than older voters,  and I don't see where they can prove this.    I.e.  if older GOP voters can "go to the polls on election day if they have to" so can Dem leaning people-of-color voters.     The fact that historically the latter have NOT done so,   isn't a legal consideration. 

 

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14 hours ago, mr6666 said:

:blink:

This last is by far the dumbest thing from the dumb-a$$ Republican Party yet.   I would hope that state and Federal courts would rule this as Unconstitutional.

As for ID for absentee voting, how will this be provided?  Will they accept a copy from a home printer as being valid?  Will they require a notarized copy?  Do they have to send a copy with the request for the ballot as well a with the ballot itself?

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1 hour ago, ElCid said:

This last is by far the dumbest thing from the dumb-a$$ Republican Party yet.   I would hope that state and Federal courts would rule this as Unconstitutional.

As for ID for absentee voting, how will this be provided?  Will they accept a copy from a home printer as being valid?  Will they require a notarized copy?  Do they have to send a copy with the request for the ballot as well a with the ballot itself?

It does sound really dumb UNLESS there is also a clause that only prevents people who can be clearly identified with a political party or candidate from providing the assistance.    (and of course there are already rules that prevent such people,  signs etc...  at polling places  and that GOPers and Trumpers violated in pass elections).

This is similar to driving people to polls (by non relatives);  This should be legal expect when organized by a partisan group \ PAC etc...  (an area where Abrams' effort got close to such a line).

As for the ID:   I agree with such a concept since using software (or human beings)  to "match" a signature on a ballot to a one "on file" by some government agency isn't very reliable.

I would agree with a rule that accepted a copy of one's Driver license,  passport or other official government document.   Again, I don't believe some form of validation is unreasonable  (even if the intentions of the pols asking for such rules are nefarious).

 PS:  note that I just got my shots and there were 3 different ID checks.     (all expected the same ID, which for me was my driver license).   

 

 

 

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Sure.  And a driver's license (or state ID) should be all that's needed at the polling place.  Where I live all I ever had to show was my voter registration card, which in Lincoln Park can be obtained at the city clerk's office.

Sepiatone

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5 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Sure.  And a driver's license (or state ID) should be all that's needed at the polling place.  Where I live all I ever had to show was my voter registration card, which in Lincoln Park can be obtained at the city clerk's office.

Sepiatone

The issue in question was what type of ID should be supplied for a mail-in \ absentee ballot.

 

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2 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Sure.  And a driver's license (or state ID) should be all that's needed at the polling place.  Where I live all I ever had to show was my voter registration card, which in Lincoln Park can be obtained at the city clerk's office.

Sepiatone

Interesting.  Our voter registration cards are mailed to us here, every 2 years.  Until a few years ago, it was all you needed to vote.  Now you need a state or national ID (military, passport, etc).    There are exceptions to the ID requirement, though.

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5 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Interesting.  Our voter registration cards are mailed to us here, every 2 years.  Until a few years ago, it was all you needed to vote.  Now you need a state or national ID (military, passport, etc).    There are exceptions to the ID requirement, though.

Before the change what happened if one moved between the two year "re-check" period?  E.g.  would the registration cards just be forwared to the new address and  one could  just sign and return? 

 I ask because voting policies that "required" having a stable address was one of the areas that lead to voter suppression of the less-well-off and people-of-color.      Thus Dems in states  where they had the power tried to undo such stable-address requirements.

 

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4 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Before the change what happened if one moved between the two year "re-check" period?  E.g.  would the registration cards just be forwared to the new address and  one could  just sign and return? 

 I ask because voting policies that "required" having a stable address was one of the areas that lead to voter suppression of the less-well-off and people-of-color.      Thus Dems in states  where they had the power tried to undo such stable-address requirements.

 

I've not moved since 1993, so I haven't had to deal with that in a long time.  When you check in at the polling place, the first question asked is if you are still living at the address on the card.   I suppose you could lie.  They cross-check it with a computerized list at the polling place. 

The card is marked "RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED" so it won't be forwarded.  On the back of my card it states:

If you move within your county, or if any information on this certificate changes or is incorrect, correct the information in the space provided, sign below, and return this certificate to the voter registrar.  If you move to a new county, you must re-register by completing and providing a new voter registration application to your new county.

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23 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I've not moved since 1993, so I haven't had to deal with that in a long time.  When you check in at the polling place, the first question asked is if you are still living at the address on the card.   I suppose you could lie.  They cross-check it with a computerized list at the polling place. 

The card is marked "RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED" so it won't be forwarded.  On the back of my card it states:

If you move within your county, or if any information on this certificate changes or is incorrect, correct the information in the space provided, sign below, and return this certificate to the voter registrar.  If you move to a new county, you must re-register by completing and providing a new voter registration application to your new county.

Useful information.    Of course since the card won't be forwarded,  if someone moved (within the county or not),  they couldn't read what was on the back.  (i.e.  they would have to have read that the last time they did receive the card,   and done the follow up with the voter registrar,   but clearly they didn't since the card is still going to an "old" address).

 

 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

The issue in question was what type of ID should be supplied for a mail-in \ absentee ballot.

 

I vote by absentee and too, a valid driver's license/state ID was all that was required.   

 

1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Interesting.  Our voter registration cards are mailed to us here, every 2 years.  Until a few years ago, it was all you needed to vote.  Now you need a state or national ID (military, passport, etc).    There are exceptions to the ID requirement, though.

Ours are too, but in the case it gets misplaced or otherwise damaged the city clerk here will gladly issue a replacement.  And still all you need to vote.

Sepiatone

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44 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I vote by absentee and too, a valid driver's license/state ID was all that was required.   

 

Ours are too, but in the case it gets misplaced or otherwise damaged the city clerk here will gladly issue a replacement.  And still all you need to vote.

Sepiatone

Interesting;   How did you supply this valid driver's license?  E.g.  did you make a copy and place that copy in the envelope along with your ballot?

OR are you saying one doesn't need to supply the document as part of sending in the ballot but only have such a document "on file" with the county\state?

 

 

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22 hours ago, mr6666 said:

:blink:

Jesus H. Christ! And these are Christians???? WHY should that be illegal??????? Or are they concerned about Covid safety? LOL!

They want people to suffer as much as possible.

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5 hours ago, ElCid said:

This last is by far the dumbest thing from the dumb-a$$ Republican Party yet.   I would hope that state and Federal courts would rule this as Unconstitutional.

As for ID for absentee voting, how will this be provided?  Will they accept a copy from a home printer as being valid?  Will they require a notarized copy?  Do they have to send a copy with the request for the ballot as well a with the ballot itself?

No, you'll have to send your id in with your application! LOL.

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6 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Jesus H. Christ! And these are Christians???? WHY should that be illegal??????? Or are they concerned about Covid safety? LOL!

As I posted above there would be a valid reason for such assistance to be illegal;    because those giving it are clearly associated with a specific political party or candidate. 

E.g..   you wouldn't want people wearing MAGA red hats to be handling out food and water to those waiting in line to vote.

 

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6 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Interesting.  Our voter registration cards are mailed to us here, every 2 years.  Until a few years ago, it was all you needed to vote.  Now you need a state or national ID (military, passport, etc).    There are exceptions to the ID requirement, though.

In S.C. your registration card is good until you move.  I registered for current location in 1991 and I think I got one new card since then because of a change of the cards or something.  

S.C. requires picture ID to vote in person using such things as military ID, drivers' license, concealed weapons permit (yes, really) and a couple of others.

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The Washington Post
The Post Most
 
 
1d50ae052bdc2d74585b2ed1d1a3e604-EIZ4ZEQ5IEI6XLKTJQP5USMQPU-600-0-70-8.jpg

(Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

How GOP-backed voting measures could create hurdles for tens of millions of voters

The push to enact hundreds of new restrictions could potentially amount to the most sweeping contraction of ballot access since the end of Reconstruction, a Post analysis has found.

By Amy Gardner, Kate Rabinowitz and Harry Stevens   Read more »

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2 hours ago, Bogie56 said:
The Washington Post
The Post Most
 
 
1d50ae052bdc2d74585b2ed1d1a3e604-EIZ4ZEQ5IEI6XLKTJQP5USMQPU-600-0-70-8.jpg

(Salwan Georges/The Washington Post)

How GOP-backed voting measures could create hurdles for tens of millions of voters

The push to enact hundreds of new restrictions could potentially amount to the most sweeping contraction of ballot access since the end of Reconstruction, a Post analysis has found.

By Amy Gardner, Kate Rabinowitz and Harry Stevens   Read more »

I doubt it is "the most sweeping contraction of ballot access since the end of Reconstruction."  Maybe since the end of the Jim Crow era.  Of course, many of these new laws are in non-Southern states, but historically states in the North, Mid-West and West also discriminated against minorities.

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3 hours ago, ElCid said:

I doubt it is "the most sweeping contraction of ballot access since the end of Reconstruction."  Maybe since the end of the Jim Crow era.  Of course, many of these new laws are in non-Southern states, but historically states in the North, Mid-West and West also discriminated against minorities.

All but a handful of states had laws that discriminated against minorities, whether it was separate public facilities, suppression of voting rights, miscegenation, housing or employment.  Some examples are listed here:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Jim_Crow_law_examples_by_state

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