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Bring your Christmas blasphemies here.


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1 hour ago, ElCid said:

Christmas parades were created to bring families downtown so the kids could badger parents into purchasing something.  Same with department store santas.  As in A Christmas Story.

Every "town" around here had one this year, even the ones that barely qualify as a crossroads.  They are all very lame.  Remove the fire trucks, police cars, government "officials," high school band and dance studio kids advertising the studios and you don't have much left.

Oh, and I never liked the Beatles.  A couple of songs, such as Yesterday, are not too bad, but as for the others I passed then and I pass now.  I have purchased a lot of CD's over the past several years of music from the 50's-70's, but none with the Beatles.

While on this thread.  I don't like It's a Wonderful Life at all - too sappy and silly.  I will watch George C. Scott's A Christmas Carol, but pass on the others.  My wife watches all of them.

Okay, lemme see here.

He doesn't like the Beatles nor IAWL.

Hmmm, I wonder if it might be because he's a Mopar guy, if this might help explain this?

(...I mean, ya know how those kind'a guys always tend to be such contrarians about everything anyway)

;)

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34 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Bullying people with false victimhood.

I always thought saying "Merry Christmas" was an expression of well-wishing. 

I'm happy that most people see it that way. They must, if having it said to me by strangers (like store clerks) is any indication. I've been wished "Merry Christmas" by such people hundreds - if not thousands - of times. The number of times one of them has ever said "Seasons Greetings" to me is zero so far. I think a couple said "Happy Holidays" once or twice.

But "Merry Christmas" is what I hear most and I love that for the week or so before December 25. Always makes me feel good.

I'll never understand why anyone would get angry at such a peaceful, loving, emotionally-positive expression.

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1 hour ago, mister37 said:

I'll never understand why anyone would get angry at such a peaceful, loving, emotionally-positive expression.

And I don't know anyone who has.  Which illustrates my point.  The dominant culture, as a stratagem to preserve its position portrays itself as one of the very groups it victimizes in order to  delegitimize  honest objections to the impositions it makes on minority views.  Bad enough swords are used to belabor people about their shoulders and head,  so much worse to use an olive branch.

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11 hours ago, mister37 said:

I'll never understand why anyone would get angry at such a peaceful, loving, emotionally-positive expression.

Well how would you feel if a cashier said goodbye with "Allah has blessed you"? Or even the innocuous "namasté"?

I'm not a Christian and view Christmas as a religious holiday, even though the majority who "celebrate" it, don't. I always wonder how a Christian would react to bombardment of OTHER people's religious beliefs. 

I'm real happy when a cashier says a plain old "Thank you" since physically going into a store has severely diminished and there will be no Happy Holidays in 2020.

 

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6 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Well how would you feel if a cashier said goodbye with "Allah has blessed you"? Or even the innocuous "namasté"?

I'd feel good. 

Being well-wished is always welcome.

Although, I have to admit - I'd be puzzled at "namaste" on account of not knowing what it is.

But I wouldn't be angry, nor would I complain that what was said shouldn't be permitted to be said.

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14 hours ago, Dargo said:

Okay, lemme see here.

He doesn't like the Beatles nor IAWL.

Hmmm, I wonder if it might be because he's a Mopar guy, if this might help explain this?

(...I mean, ya know how those kind'a guys always tend to be such contrarians about everything anyway)

;)

Actually I'm not a Mopar guy - my '71 Dodge Challenger cured me of that forever.  I just like the looks of the mid to late 50's Chryslers and De Sotos.  My last American car was a '96 Ford Taurus.  Currently own two Japanese and one German vehicles.  Not a big fan of European cars either really.

As for music, late-'50's through early '70's, predominately rock, beach, doo-w o p, easy listening, country and similar.

 

12 hours ago, mister37 said:

I always thought saying "Merry Christmas" was an expression of well-wishing. 

I'm happy that most people see it that way. They must, if having it said to me by strangers (like store clerks) is any indication. I've been wished "Merry Christmas" by such people hundreds - if not thousands - of times. The number of times one of them has ever said "Seasons Greetings" to me is zero so far. I think a couple said "Happy Holidays" once or twice.

But "Merry Christmas" is what I hear most and I love that for the week or so before December 25. Always makes me feel good.

I'll never understand why anyone would get angry at such a peaceful, loving, emotionally-positive expression.

The ultra right-wing "Christians" began the whole battle over Merry Christmas vs. Seasons Greetings or Happy Holidays.  They were and still are up in arms over use of Seasons Greetings or Happy Holidays.  I was raised in a small town and attended an evangelical church.  Nobody cared whether you said Merry Christmas, Seasons Greetings or Happy Holidays.  Stores had signage with all three.

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1 minute ago, mister37 said:

I'm glad the stores had signs that included "Merry Christmas", considering that's the most common expression spoken during the 'season'.

Forgot.  Christmas cards then and now also contain all three expressions.

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21 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Season greetings.   Happy Holidays.     I.e. something NOT limited to Christians \ Christmas.

Something that makes compels atheist like myself to purchase gifts for others during December.

 

 

As I recall there were several "flaps" over terminology.  "Happy Holidays" was considered too inclusive for some,  too secular for others.  "Happy Holidays" didn't call special attention to Christmas for some people to be happy.   But still others preferred "Happy Holidays"  because it was more inclusive, seeing as to how Christmas was celebrated this time of year, Hanukkah too, along with  KWANZAA  and New Years also supposedly included in the greeting.  Personally, I find nothing wrong with any separate acknowledgement or an all encompassing greeting.  But some people always gotta gripe about something.

Sepiatone

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5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

As I recall there were several "flaps" over terminology.  "Happy Holidays" was considered too inclusive for some,  too secular for others.  "Happy Holidays" didn't call special attention to Christmas for some people to be happy.   But still others preferred "Happy Holidays"  because it was more inclusive, seeing as to how Christmas was celebrated this time of year, Hanukkah too, along with  KWANZAA  and New Years also supposedly included in the greeting.  Personally, I find nothing wrong with any separate acknowledgement or an all encompassing greeting.  But some people always gotta gripe about something.

Sepiatone

My wife worked in a friend-owned small retail store for many years.  (It always reminded me of the store in The Shop Around The Corner, although it didn't sell leather goods.)   During the Christmas season, my wife's practice was to say "Happy Holidays" to customers because we live in an area with people of widely varying religious backgrounds, and she figured that almost everyone celebrates some holiday around this time of the year -- even if only the calendar-mandated New Year.  (Other employees chose to say "Merry Christmas" -- it was up to them.)

Well, most people responded to my wife's "Happy Holidays" with a smile or other positive sign.  

But she says that there were always some people who acted as though she had said "F*V*ç*K  You," and responded "Merry Christmas" with a scowl.   Keep in mind that my wife was working in a store that sold, among other things, Christmas ornaments and items intended as gifts, and that it was decorated from floor to ceiling with Christmas decorations during the holiday season.   But some of the customers apparently thought that it was most important to enforce their own idea of which holiday everyone should acknowledge, emphasizing their own perceived victimhood rather unpleasantly, rather than enjoying the warm holiday setting that the store owner and the employees tried to create for everyone.

As some astute observer once said, "If there really was a 'War on Christmas,' Christmas won."

 

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8 minutes ago, BingFan said:

My wife worked in a friend-owned small retail store for many years.  (It always reminded me of the store in The Shop Around The Corner, although it didn't sell leather goods.)   During the Christmas season, my wife's practice was to say "Happy Holidays" to customers because we live in an area with people of widely varying religious backgrounds, and she figured that almost everyone celebrates some holiday around this time of the year -- even if only the calendar-mandated New Year.  (Other employees chose to say "Merry Christmas" -- it was up to them.)

Well, most people responded to my wife's "Happy Holidays" with a smile or other positive sign.  

But she says that there were always some people who acted as though she had said "F*V*ç*K  You," and responded "Merry Christmas" with a scowl.   Keep in mind that my wife was working in a store that sold, among other things, Christmas ornaments and items intended as gifts, and that it was decorated from floor to ceiling with Christmas decorations during the holiday season.   But some of the customers apparently thought that it was most important to enforce their own idea of which holiday everyone should acknowledge, emphasizing their own perceived victimhood rather unpleasantly, rather than enjoying the warm holiday setting that the store owner and the employees tried to create for everyone.

As some astute observer once said, "If there really was a 'War on Christmas,' Christmas won."

 

It's ironic that their "Merry Christmas" with a scowl destroyed the whole fundamental spirit of Christmas, which can be enjoyed by any human being, whether they are religious or not.

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1 hour ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I don't care if store clerks say "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Holidays." But I HATE Salvation Army bellringers in or in front of stores. Apart from certain policies of the parent organization, the ringers are always dead in the eyes and ring the bell mechanically. (Are they trained to do that?).

Yes, I believe they are trained to do that, Polly. I've heard they've taken the same courses in this as the TSA agents you see at airports!  LOL

But then again, years ago when my first job with the airlines was as a reservation agent with TWA in downtown Los Angeles, after answering the same seven freakin' questions I got day in and day out over the phone, I noticed MY eyes were startin' to get a little "dead" TOO, and this being before quitting that job and getting  one with another airline at LAX and where my job functions varied quite a bit more. I then noticed my eyes becoming much more lively again.

(...in other words, any monotonous job or function is usually going to have people becoming "dead in the eyes" after a while)

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Btw, and speaking of "dead in the eyes"...

Is it only me or has anyone else noticed that this "condition" seems to have been growing among the general population for years now?

Uh-huh, even BEFORE we've rolled into this damn forgetable year of 2020.

Yep, I see people with "dead eyes" EVERYWHERE it seems now days, and like life has been sucked right out of 'em.

(...and I ain't just talkin' about the poor guys you see on street corners with signs sayin' "Please Help", either)

 

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2 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I don't care if store clerks say "Merry Christmas" or "Happy Holidays." But I HATE Salvation Army bellringers in or in front of stores. Apart from certain policies of the parent organization, the ringers are always dead in the eyes and ring the bell mechanically. (Are they trained to do that?).

 You must live in a really big city with millions of people-- where  there's bound to be a little bit of coldness and monotony.

 Where I live --all my life-- the Bell Ringers for the Salvation Army have been warm and cordial people who stand in front of Kroger's, Walmart, Walgreens Etc.

They stand outside the stores in the cold and they never stop smiling and wishing you a Merry Christmas-- whether you drop something in the bucket or not.

No matter how frazzled or tired I feel when I see them, somehow they always manage to cheer me up-- even on the way into Walmart.LOL

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

Btw, and speaking of "dead in the eyes"...

Is it only me or has anyone else noticed that this "condition" seems to have been growing among the general population for years now?

Uh-huh, even BEFORE we've rolled into this damn forgetable year of 2020.

Yep, I see people with "dead eyes" EVERYWHERE it seems now days, and like life has been sucked right out of 'em.

(...and I ain't just talkin' about the poor guys you see on street corners with signs sayin' "Please Help", either)

 

Could it be because the rest of the facial features are hidden behind a mask and you're just paying more attention only to the eyes nowadays?

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9 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Could it be because the rest of the facial features are hidden behind a mask and you're just paying more attention only to the eyes nowadays?

Not a bad guess here Tex, but nope, like I said earlier, I've noticed this AND have actually commented upon this sort'a thing to others for many years now.

(...and has always brought to mind Thoreau's "quiet desperation" line)

 

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From Wikipedia:  '"Happy Holiday" was introduced by Bing Crosby and Marjorie Reynolds (dubbed by Martha Mears) in the 1942 film Holiday Inn in a scene when the Inn opens for the first time. While it is commonly regarded as a Christmas song, in the film it is performed on New Year's Eve, and expresses a wish for the listener to enjoy "happy holidays" throughout the entire year.

Jo Stafford was the first to release it on a Christmas album, on her album of the same name in 1955.[2]

The Kay Thompson song "The Holiday Season" is sometimes paired with "Happy Holiday" as a medley. This was first popularized by Andy Williams (who Thompson herself discovered and mentored). Other artists who have covered the "Happy Holiday"/"Holiday Season" medley include The Manhattan Transfer, She & Him, and Michael W. Smith."

I think the Christian Evangelicals and Republicans started this whole anything other than Merry Christmas is evil.   I do not recall this ever being a discussion until fairly recently.

For me, Happy Holidays, Seasons Greetings, etc. are fine and cover the holiday season, which begins with Thanksgiving and ends with New Year's Day.

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