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A Matter of Life and Death: Stranger than fiction


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Just saw A Matter of Life and Death , with David Niven and Kim Hunter, last night. The celestial judge was played by an actor I had never heard of named Abraham Sofaer. By an eerie coincidence, there was a highly regarded federal judge in Manhattan named Abraham Sofaer. (He is now dead and the time for his appeals has run out.) Even stranger, when I saw the name in the initial credits, I realized that the real-life judge Sofaer would have been of an appropriate age for a child actor part and was looking for him throughout the movie.

What are the odds?

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Abraham Sofaer played the apostle Paul in Quo Vadis, was the voice of the Phasian in star trek ep Charlie-X as well as the voice of the melkotian in 3rd year ep Spectre of the Gun and he even guest-starred on Lost in Space...

Lost in Space (1965)

and played a Hindu on Kolchak the Night Stalker.

 

 

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He also appeared in two episodes of "The Time Tunnel": "Revenge of the Gods" (1966, the one about The Trojan War) and "The Walls of Jericho" (1967, pictured below). The latter episode was interrupted and pre-empted during its original telecast by ABC News coverage about the tragic Apollo 1 fire that killed three astronauts.

See the source image

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28 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I loved Kolchak and remember the episode; now I'm nostalgic for Kolchak (ME TV used to run him on Sunday nights and I remember the original movie of the week that introduced him).

MeTV recently began airing "Kolchak" episodes early on Sunday mornings.

See the source image

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On 12/13/2020 at 2:10 PM, jakeem said:

He also appeared in two episodes of "The Time Tunnel": "Revenge of the Gods" (1966, the one about The Trojan War) and "The Walls of Jericho" (1967, pictured below). The latter episode was interrupted and pre-empted during its original telecast by ABC News coverage about the tragic Apollo 1 fire that killed three astronauts.

See the source image

Sorry to inform you but the screen capture from above is not of Abraham Sofaer. It is however the actor Arnold Moss who portrayed Anton Karidian in the Star Trek episode "The Conscience of the King", a first season episode from the original series.

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6 minutes ago, fxreyman said:

Sorry to inform you but the screen capture from above is not of Abraham Sofaer. It is however the actor Arnold Moss who portrayed Anton Karidian in the Star Trek episode "The Conscience of the King", a first season episode from the original series.

Thanks! It's Moss from "The Walls of Jericho" episode in which he played the city's high priest Malek. Sofaer was the blind father of the harlot Rahab (played by Myrna Fahey).

Of course, this reminds me of the 1966 Shirley MacLaine-Sir Michael Caine film "Gambit," in which Moss and John Abbott played secondary roles. The veteran actors looked so much alike that it made one wonder if their casting was deliberate.

IMG_8475

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On 12/13/2020 at 4:45 PM, chaya bat woof woof said:

I loved Kolchak and remember the episode; now I'm nostalgic for Kolchak (ME TV used to run him on Sunday nights and I remember the original movie of the week that introduced him).

I know this is the message board for me. I've only been here a few days and only posted 3-4 times but in my short time I've seen references to "Sometimes a Great Notion" and now "Kolchak". I thought I was the only one who ever remembered those productions. Next it will be someone who says something nice about "Bonfire of the Vanities".  I can't be the the only one who actually like it? Anyone? 

I've found a home!

 

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I didn't think "Bonfire" was all that bad, but too, not all that good.  But as it's said---  "To each-----"(etc.) 

And for 50 or so years of being a big fan of the book, I retch every time I read a reference to the abysmally wretched movie version of SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION.  

But too, I was also a huge fan of the KOLCHAK  TV movies and then the sadly short lived series.  

I'll welcome you too with a mention of my curiosity as to your screen name.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

I didn't think "Bonfire" was all that bad, but too, not all that good.  But as it's said---  "To each-----"(etc.) 

And for 50 or so years of being a big fan of the book, I retch every time I read a reference to the abysmally wretched movie version of SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION.  

But too, I was also a huge fan of the KOLCHAK  TV movies and then the sadly short lived series.  

I'll welcome you too with a mention of my curiosity as to your screen name.  ;) 

Sepiatone

1. While "Sometimes a Great Notion" is forgettable in many ways it did have a terrific cast and, for me, one of the greatest death scenes with Paul Newman and Richard Jaeckel which was later shamelessly ripped off in the Liam Neeson wilderness survival thriller "The Grey".

2. I always wanted to be a fly on the wall of the scriptwriters for "Kolchak".  I wonder what drug those guys were on. It was like if Buck Henry and Rod Serling were co-writers.  

3. I have always loved Mr. Magoo.  He could act! The Mr. Maggo version of "A Christmas Carol" is number 3 on my favorite versions of the story because it was my first introduction to the Christmas classic.  George C. Scott's is first and the Alastair Slim version is second. 

2. 

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On 12/13/2020 at 5:17 PM, jakeem said:

MeTV recently began airing "Kolchak" episodes early on Sunday mornings.

I sometimes catch a bit there just before Lost In Space...at 1am EST.  I remember The Night Stalker TV series when it was new.  It is disappointing after the two great and good TV movies. 

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21 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

1. While "Sometimes a Great Notion" is forgettable in many ways it did have a terrific cast and, for me, one of the greatest death scenes with Paul Newman and Richard Jaeckel which was later shamelessly ripped off in the Liam Neeson wilderness survival thriller "The Grey".

2. I always wanted to be a fly on the wall of the scriptwriters for "Kolchak".  I wonder what drug those guys were on. It was like if Buck Henry and Rod Serling were co-writers.  

3. I have always loved Mr. Magoo.  He could act! The Mr. Maggo version of "A Christmas Carol" is number 3 on my favorite versions of the story because it was my first introduction to the Christmas classic.  George C. Scott's is first and the Alastair Slim version is second. 

2. 

In "Notion" I'd replace  Fonda with WILL GEER    .  Swap Joe Moross with NED BEATTY (making it his film debut instead of "Deliverance").  And not cut so much of the novel out and change the ending to the book's. 

I never considered Magoo to be an actor!  :D   But always enjoyed the cartoons.  

Sepiatone

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2 hours ago, slaytonf said:

It sure was!  People act with their voice as much as their body.

Agree! Voice acting takes real talent. The radio serials, etc. were before my time, but they were acting all the same even if just in front of a microphone. I attended a production of the Prairie Home Companion one time. Definitely acting.

So Backus, besides Gilligan's Island and Rebel Without a Cause, was a real actor. Quite good, actually.

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2 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

Agree! Voice acting takes real talent. The radio serials, etc. were before my time, but they were acting all the same even if just in front of a microphone. I attended a production of the Prairie Home Companion one time. Definitely acting.

So Backus, besides Gilligan's Island and Rebel Without a Cause, was a real actor. Quite good, actually.

True.  And in feature animation (and they may do shorts the same way - not entirely sure), the voice actors record their parts in isolation, without the benefit of cueing and playing off their fellow actors reactions.   The voice tracks are laid down first before animators do their thing (I was going to say draw, but if it's computerized, is it still drawing?)  At least in Disney's case, they also video the actors as they record their parts, and, in part, use the facial expressions the voice actors have to help with their animation.

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