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Your Choice For 1948 Best Picture Oscar


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Choose which one you would have voted for from the actual nominees with your reason why.

THE NOMINEES:

Hamlet*

Johnny Belinda

The Red Shoes

The Snake Pit

Treasure Of The Sierra Madre

*=actual winner

I was struck by how different each film was, they were all  great in their own way. I had to ponder awhile but I finally decided my personal choice would be Sierra Madre. John Huston's direction takes you right into the middle of the action, especially a tough and exhausting barroom brawl and the later suspenseful desert scenes. The acting was excellent from perhaps Bogart's best ever performance right down to the smallest bit part. The writing was great too, it was one of the more interesting looks at greed and paranoia. 

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My second favorite movie of 1948 is Hamlet.  (My favorite, I Remember Mama,  received 4 nods but not for Best Pic.) I've seen all of the screen versions of Hamlet and, unlike Hamlet who just couldn't make up his mind, I can:  this version is the best.  Oscars went to Best Picture, Actor Laurence Olivier, Art-Set Decoration and Costumes.  Olivier lost the Director Oscar to John Huston for Treasure of Sierra Madre, who richly deserved to be recognized.  As did Walter Huston for Supporting Actor.  It is puzzling why Bogart, who gave one of his greatest performances, was not nominated.  1948 was a terrific year for movies.  These three pictures, for me, were at the top of an excellent list.     

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4 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Choose which one you would have voted for from the actual nominees with your reason why.

THE NOMINEES:

Hamlet*

Johnny Belinda

The Red Shoes

The Snake Pit

Treasure Of The Sierra Madre

*=actual winner

I was struck by how different each film was, they were all  great in their own way. I had to ponder awhile but I finally decided my personal choice would be Sierra Madre. John Huston's direction takes you right into the middle of the action, especially a tough and exhausting barroom brawl and the later suspenseful desert scenes. The acting was excellent from perhaps Bogart's best ever performance right down to the smallest bit part. The writing was great too, it was one of the more interesting looks at greed and paranoia. 

It's an unlikely group of films in some ways: let's film Shakespeare . . . make a film about the world of ballet . . . about a schizophrenic patient . . . about a woman who's deaf and can't speak and gets raped. Not a lot of obvious moneymakers. Oscar's pick, Hamlet, is the one I like least. I would vote for The Red Shoes, with Treasure of the Sierra Madre a close second. Some of my other 1948 favorites are Letter from an Unknown Woman and Raw Deal. The Fallen Idol was also released in1948, though maybe not in the US.

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One film stands far above the other four for me. But, perhaps, from my selection of an avatar, you already know which one I mean. It is unquestionably one of my ten favourite films of all time. My second favourite film of 1948 is a massively underrated tongue-in-cheek swashbuckler, Adventures of Don Juan. Then, again, "superficial" "non-important," merely entertaining films of this type are never taken seriously when it comes to the big awards.

And, yes, I've seen the other four films nominated on the 1948 Oscar list.

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If it were not for using trick photography during the dance scenes, Which I think is incredibly unfair to the dancers and a cheat, I would say THE RED SHOES. 

as is though, I’m SIERRA MADRE all the way, with LETTER FROM AN UNKNOWN WOMAN runner up. 

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8 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

My second favorite movie of 1948 is Hamlet.  (My favorite, I Remember Mama,  received 4 nods but not for Best Pic.) I've seen all of the screen versions of Hamlet and, unlike Hamlet who just couldn't make up his mind, I can:  this version is the best.  Oscars went to Best Picture, Actor Laurence Olivier, Art-Set Decoration and Costumes.  Olivier lost the Director Oscar to John Huston for Treasure of Sierra Madre, who richly deserved to be recognized.  As did Walter Huston for Supporting Actor.  It is puzzling why Bogart, who gave one of his greatest performances, was not nominated.  1948 was a terrific year for movies.  These three pictures, for me, were at the top of an excellent list.     

I agree with you that I Remember Mama is the best (and my favorite) film of 1948. Though I like Olivier's Hamlet,  I prefer Branagh's 1996 version, partly because his cuts are not so drastic, and partly for other reasons of acting and camera style.  Olivier cuts Rosenkrantz, Guildenstern, and Fortanbras, as well as a lot of dialogue. I like my Hamlet to be as complete as possible. I realize that one has to make cuts when adapting a long play for the screen, but I think Olivier doesn't always make the right choices. But of course it's good to have a record of his performance.

I'm not a fan of The Treasure of Sierra Madre. Although I enjoy many of John Huston's works, I don't think it was until Wise Blood and The Dead that Huston made truly great films.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Choose which one you would have voted for from the actual nominees with your reason why.

THE NOMINEES:

Hamlet*

Johnny Belinda

The Red Shoes

The Snake Pit

Treasure Of The Sierra Madre

From this list, I'd choose HAMLET. I think the Academy got it "right."

But my favorite film from 1948 is not on this list. It's one I choose for sentimental reasons-- THE MIRACLE OF THE BELLS.

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5 hours ago, kingrat said:

It's an unlikely group of films in some ways: let's film Shakespeare . . . make a film about the world of ballet . . . about a schizophrenic patient . . . about a woman who's deaf and can't speak and gets raped. Not a lot of obvious moneymakers. Oscar's pick, Hamlet, is the one I like least. I would vote for The Red Shoes, with Treasure of the Sierra Madre a close second. Some of my other 1948 favorites are Letter from an Unknown Woman and Raw Deal. The Fallen Idol was also released in1948, though maybe not in the US.

I'm with you here.   My selection would be The Red Shoes with Sierra Madre a close second.     If it wasn't for the ending,  I would have selected Sierra Madre.   Those lines Curtin says at the end about helping a widow,  for a guy he only knew for a few hours,,,,,,,  are just too sappy for me.   (also what I find to be the overly long Indian scenes,,, even with Walter Huston's spot on acting in those scenes).

 

 

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My choice is clearly The Red Shoes.  Not merely are the cinematography and choreography excellent, they seminal.  And while the message of The Treasure of the sierra Madre important andtrue, the message of The Red Shoes (that true art is difficult and more important than love) gets points  for being less popular.

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I'd have voted Sierra Madre, probably, but Tim Holt (God love him, by all accounts a good man) just wasn't a very good actor and was in way over his head. His stilted delivery kills the buzz too often for me.

Hamlet may not be as entertaining, but I'm glad it was done. Here is a snippet from act III scene ii, just before the play within the play. Jean Simmons made a very sympathetic Ophelia.

(The full movie is available on YT, but it comes with bright yellow subtitles in Portuguese.)

 

Edit: Re-reading this and after looking over Tim Holt's filmography, I think I was too harsh. I should say I don't think he was all that great in Sierra Madre.  He made many, many movies and won wide acclaim. I just know him best from Madre. 

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1 hour ago, LuckyDan said:

I'd have voted Sierra Madre, probably, but Tim Holt (God love him, by all accounts a good man) just wasn't a very good actor and was in way over his head. His stilted delivery kills the buzz too often for me.

Hamlet may not be as entertaining, but I'm glad it was done. Here is a snippet from act III scene ii, just before the play within the play. Jean Simmons made a very sympathetic Ophelia.

(The full movie is available on YT, but it comes with bright yellow subtitles in Portuguese.)

 

Edit: Re-reading this and after looking over Tim Holt's filmography, I think I was too harsh. I should say I don't think he was all that great in Sierra Madre.  He made many, many movies and won wide acclaim. I just know him best from Madre. 

I see where you’re coming from with Tim Holt. He has a very effortless style that could be taken either way: 

1. This guy isn’t trying

or

2. This guy is a natural

Personally, I am somewhat inclined to go with the second, although I have not seen many of his “legit“ films- I know he appeared in an absolute ton of B-westerns. I also admit that I find him *very* attractive, Especially when he is scruffy or stubbled and we all know how especially shameless I am when it comes to a handsome face- ESPECIALLY a scruffy or stubbled one. 

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I hope you’ll forgive me because I understand where you’re all coming from, but I still say THE RED SHOES is marred by the camera tricks employed in the dance scene. And every time I see it, it honestly enrages me it is so unfair to the dancers. I mean, the whole movie deals with the fact the dancers have to contort their bodies, defy gravity, bend the will of the earth and the human body and physiology to achieve what they achieve- and then the directors undercut all of this by using, if I recall correctly, freeze frames, and are there times where they reversed or sped up the film? It’s been a While since I have seen it, but every time I do it just bothers me that the dancers are not allowed to dance and perform the number without the manipulation of the filmmakers, Which is unnecessary, and, for me personally, disrespectful. I mean the Director(s) dont pull this kind of crap on the actors when they’re acting, he doesn’t speed up in reverse and freeze frame their scenes.

Otherwise though, yeah it is an absolutely fantastic film, and Anton Walbrook would without a doubt be my choice for the best actor of 1948, even over Bogart.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I see where you’re coming from with Tim Holt. He has a very effortless style that could be taken either way: 

1. This guy isn’t trying

or

2. This guy is a natural

Personally, I am somewhat inclined to go with the second, although I have not seen many of his “legit“ films- I know he appeared in an absolute ton of B-westerns. I also admit that I find him *very* attractive, Especially when he is scruffy or stubbled and we all know how especially shameless I am when it comes to a handsome face- ESPECIALLY a scruffy or stubbled one. 

Sitting here stroking my beard and considering Holt's only other performance I really remember and that was in The Magnificent Ambersons. Even Welles said he was a most "interesting actor." I think anyone, even Garfield (who was considered for a part at one time) would have had a difficult time staying equal to the performances of Bogart and Huston in that one. 

But as I always say when tossing out opinions on things I know little about, what the hell do I know?

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1 hour ago, LuckyDan said:

Sitting here stroking my beard and considering Holt's only other performance I really remember and that was in The Magnificent Ambersons. Even Welles said he was a most "interesting actor." I think anyone, even Garfield (who was considered for a part at one time) would have had a difficult time staying equal to the performances of Bogart and Huston in that one. 

But as I always say when tossing out opinions on things I know little about, what the hell do I know?

He’s also in MY DARLING CLEMENTINE and several westerns where he plays, literally “ TIM HOLT,” Which I don’t know, HAD to have been a little weird.

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On 1/8/2021 at 11:11 AM, filmnoirguy said:

I've seen all of the screen versions of Hamlet and, unlike Hamlet who just couldn't make up his mind, I can:  this version is the best.   

I watched it from start to finish this morning and though I have not seen all screen versions, this one would be hard to beat. Many scenes are visually stunning, especially the image of Ophelia floating across the screen, calmly and serenely, singing softly, to her death. Olivier made me laugh a few times with his "why whatever can you mean?" feigned innocence and mannerisms.

And I did not know that the writers of The Addams Family tv show based their Ophelia on Jean Simmons' characterization, but even that knowledge did not distract from the poignance of her portrayal.

I'm going to watch it again soon with the text in hand so I can keep up a little better. 

 

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it might not be the best, but a serious candidate for MOST ENDURING picture of 1948 would be ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN, [dare I say even more than THE RED SHOES!]

OIP.baZlX0dPUICQGYm4j3zBWQHaLH?pid=Api&r

AND MAYBE THE BEST POSTER ART OF THE YEAR AS WELL!

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