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Who should have won Best song?


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People, or at least me, wonder who should  have won the Oscars.  The thing about Best song is that I can never tell if a song wasn't nominated because the Academy was too stupid to choose it, or because it wasn't eligible for some reason.  I remember my brother being annoyed that "Man of Constant Sorrow" wasn't nominated for O Brother, Where Art Thou?, not realizing that it was a decades old standard.

Any alternatives?

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7 hours ago, skimpole said:

Any alternatives?

In 1964, "Chim Chim Cheree" from Mary Poppins won the Oscar. I would have hoped one of the Beatles' songs from A Hard Day's Night would have won or at least be nominated, maybe the beautiful and haunting "And I Love Her".

These were the other nominees from that year:

title song from Dear Heart

title song from Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte

"My Kind Of Town" from Robin And The Seven Hoods

title song from Where Love Has Gone

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I'm not sure what qualifies.  I prefer Feed the Birds to Chim Chim Cheree.  The Beatle's songs may have been ineligible because they came off their albums.  I like My Kind of Town.  Slightly off topic, I think The Beatles lost out on the Grammy for Best New Artist to Alvin and the Chipmunks.

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In both construct lyrically and musically, I thought "Somewhere Out There" from AN AMERICAN TAIL('86)  was FAR superior to the  top 40 "pop" tripe of "Take My Breath Away" from TOP GUN('86) which, between the two, wound up with the statuette.    Heh....

And even today, they STILL try to sell us on the lie that movie popularity( which rarely translates into quality)  never plays into who or what wins an award.

Sepiatone

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5 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I'm not sure what qualifies.  I prefer Feed the Birds to Chim Chim Cheree.  The Beatle's songs may have been ineligible because they came off their albums.  I like My Kind of Town.  Slightly off topic, I think The Beatles lost out on the Grammy for Best New Artist to Alvin and the Chipmunks.

Really, The Chipmunk's debut with their "Chipmunk Song(Christmas Don't Be Late) "  won three Grammy's in 1958, four years before The Beatles  even formed as a band.  And even then didn't release a single that would be considered Grammy worthy for another year.

Sepiatone

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9 hours ago, skimpole said:

People, or at least me, wonder who should  have won the Oscars.  The thing about Best song is that I can never tell if a song wasn't nominated because the Academy was too stupid to choose it, or because it wasn't eligible for some reason.  I remember my brother being annoyed that "Man of Constant Sorrow" wasn't nominated for O Brother, Where Art Thou?, not realizing that it was a decades old standard.

Any alternatives?

Yes, the rules were arcane, and they changed from time to time. For a time, each studio got to nominate one song, which meant that, for instance, only one song from Meet Me in St. Louis could be nominated. The Inside Oscar books usually include for each year songs that weren't nominated. I can't vouch for their accuracy, but it's a start. They do mention songs from the Beatles' movies, so we could assume that these songs were eligible. Songwriters like the Beatles, Neil Diamond, and the Bee Gees who had big careers outside of Hollywood were often snubbed in favor of insiders.

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30 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I'm not sure what qualifies.  I prefer Feed the Birds to Chim Chim Cheree.  The Beatle's songs may have been ineligible because they came off their albums.  I like My Kind of Town.  Slightly off topic, I think The Beatles lost out on the Grammy for Best New Artist to Alvin and the Chipmunks.

My main concern in 1964 was learning how to crawl and walk, so obviously I have no first hand experience with 1964 films when they came out. 

I thought, like you did, that the album came first, and then the film A Hard Day's Night.   But they were released virtually simultaneously, and the Wiki articles state that Side 1 of the album is the film soundtrack, implying that the songs were written for the film.

My guess is that the music was just too "out there" for the Academy to nominate.

I prefer "Feed the Birds" as well.

Another overlooked song from that year was "Goldfinger"

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Here are some  songs, nominated or not, I think should have won:

1937:  "They Can't Take That Away from Me" from Shall We Dance

1944:   "The Trolley Song" from Meet Me in St. Louis  (Or "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas" not nominated from same movie)

1954:  "The Man That Got Away" from A Star is Born

1960:  "The Second Time Around" from High Time

1964:  "A Hard Day's Night" from same  (not nominated)

1967:  "The Look of Love" from Casino Royale

1977:  "Nobody Does It Better" from The Spy Who Loved Me

1980:  "On the Road Again" from Honeysuckle Rose

 

 

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1 hour ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I think The Beatles lost out on the Grammy for Best New Artist to Alvin and the Chipmunks.

Not true, The Beatles did win Best New Artist of 1964. They beat out Antonio Carlos Jobim , Morgana King, Astrud Gilberto and Petula Clark

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

 

My main concern in 1964 was learning how to crawl and walk, so obviously I have no first hand experience with 1964 films when they came out. 

I thought, like you did, that the album came first, and then the film A Hard Day's Night.   But they were released virtually simultaneously, and the Wiki articles state that Side 1 of the album is the film soundtrack, implying that the songs were written for the film.

My guess is that the music was just too "out there" for the Academy to nominate.

I prefer "Feed the Birds" as well.

Another overlooked song from that year was "Goldfinger"

I don't think the songs on the album  "Hard Day's Night" were written specifically for the film.  I believe it was the other way around, that the  songs for HDN already existed and had been recorded, and that they  (whoever "they" were) just kind of made the various songs from the album fit in appropriate spots in the movie.   "Hard Day's Night" isn't a musical in the typical sense, in that it's not like it has a story with songs that support what's going on in the plot.  They're just those great Lennon-McCartney  compositions, scattered throughout the movie at opportune moments. 

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Yes, the rules were arcane, and they changed from time to time. For a time, each studio got to nominate one song, which meant that, for instance, only one song from Meet Me in St. Louis could be nominated. The Inside Oscar books usually include for each year songs that weren't nominated. I can't vouch for their accuracy, but it's a start. They do mention songs from the Beatles' movies, so we could assume that these songs were eligible. Songwriters like the Beatles, Neil Diamond, and the Bee Gees who had big careers outside of Hollywood were often snubbed in favor of insiders.

there's also the year A KISS TO BUILD A DREAM ON from THE STRIP was nominated even thought it had already been released and recorded.

GREAT SONG THO.

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4 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

In 1964, "Chim Chim Cheree" from Mary Poppins won the Oscar. I would have hoped one of the Beatles' songs from A Hard Day's Night would have won or at least be nominated, maybe the beautiful and haunting "And I Love Her".

These were the other nominees from that year:

title song from Dear Heart

title song from Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte

"My Kind Of Town" from Robin And The Seven Hoods

title song from Where Love Has Gone

An awful pick that year. Even as a child I thought so! LOL

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The late Gerry Marsden could have been nominated for "Ferry Cross the Mersey" in 1965, which had some great actual and potential choices. "The Shadow of Your Smile" (which won) and "I Will Wait for You" have both become standards. The other three nominees were "What's New Pussycat?" (a fun song from Burt Bacharach) and the less remembered "Ballad of Cat Ballou" and "The Sweetheart Tree." Also eligible were all the songs from Help!, such as the title song, "Ticket to Ride," "The Night Before," and "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away." The title song from Catch Us If You Can was also a possible nominee. The Academy had the choice of first-rate mainstream work and first-rate "alternative" work (the healthiest situation for any art form), but chose to ignore everyone outside the film establishment.

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19 hours ago, skimpole said:

People, or at least me, wonder who should  have won the Oscars.  The thing about Best song is that I can never tell if a song wasn't nominated because the Academy was too stupid to choose it, or because it wasn't eligible for some reason.  I remember my brother being annoyed that "Man of Constant Sorrow" wasn't nominated for O Brother, Where Art Thou?, not realizing that it was a decades old standard.

Any alternatives?

Well..

 

 

Im Not Exactly Sure HOW Applicable and Ap Pro Po these Three are, Here.. but the Music ALONE For Cloud Atlas, Blade Runner 2049,; and A Very Long Engagement are Enough to Legitimately Constitute a (Entirely Audio) movie ..

 

...not to mention all three Should Have Veritably DROWNED In Awards..

 

..Sound /,Song and Otherwise ..

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4 hours ago, kingrat said:

The late Gerry Marsden could have been nominated for "Ferry Cross the Mersey" in 1965, which had some great actual and potential choices. "The Shadow of Your Smile" (which won) and "I Will Wait for You" have both become standards. The other three nominees were "What's New Pussycat?" (a fun song from Burt Bacharach) and the less remembered "Ballad of Cat Ballou" and "The Sweetheart Tree." Also eligible were all the songs from Help!, such as the title song, "Ticket to Ride," "The Night Before," and "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away." The title song from Catch Us If You Can was also a possible nominee. The Academy had the choice of first-rate mainstream work and first-rate "alternative" work (the healthiest situation for any art form), but chose to ignore everyone outside the film establishment.

Well the Academy is a film institution,  designed to promote those in the industry.      The awards are marketing instruments.     Only makes sense that members would "chose to ignore everyone outside the film establishment".  

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In 1999 the Academy could have picked Aimee Mann's "Save Me", which is a really, really great song.  Or they could have picked "Blame Canada", which is a hilarious musical number.

 

Instead they picked that awful Phil Collins song from "Tarzan".  The "South Park" boys later made a whole episode about how much Phil Collins sucks.

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1 hour ago, Vidor said:

In 1999 the Academy could have picked Aimee Mann's "Save Me", which is a really, really great song.  Or they could have picked "Blame Canada", which is a hilarious musical number.

 

Instead they picked that awful Phil Collins song from "Tarzan".  The "South Park" boys later made a whole episode about how much Phil Collins sucks.

It certainly doesn't stay in the memory.  And I have an excellent memory for Phil Collins songs.

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1969 was an interesting year. "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" from Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid" was the winner that year, I've never been a big fan of that song and it doesn't seem to fit in with the movie. "Come Saturday Morning" from The Sterile Cuckoo was my favorite of the nominees that year, it was a beautiful, wistful song about going away with friends and it worked within the movie about going away to college for the first time. 

The other nominees were:

"Jean" from The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie

title song from True Grit

"What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life" from The Happy Ending

I don't think "Everybody's Talkin'" from Midnight Cowboy was eligible since it was an older song not written for the film, or I would have chosen that one. One song I loved that I think would have been eligible was "Carry On Till Tomorrow" from The Magic Christian", written and performed by Badfinger.

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33 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

1969 was an interesting year. "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" from Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid" was the winner that year, I've never been a big fan of that song and it doesn't seem to fit in with the movie. "Come Saturday Morning" from The Sterile Cuckoo was my favorite of the nominees that year, it was a beautiful, wistful song about going away with friends and it worked within the movie about going away to college for the first time. 

The other nominees were:

"Jean" from The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie

title song from True Grit

"What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life" from The Happy Ending

I don't think "Everybody's Talkin'" from Midnight Cowboy was eligible since it was an older song not written for the film, or I would have chosen that one. One song I loved that I think would have been eligible was "Carry On Till Tomorrow" from The Magic Christian", written and performed by Badfinger.

I hate that song. I agree that "Come Saturday Morning" should have won, with "Jean" a close second.

 

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4 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

1969 was an interesting year. "Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head" from Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid" was the winner that year, I've never been a big fan of that song and it doesn't seem to fit in with the movie. "Come Saturday Morning" from The Sterile Cuckoo was my favorite of the nominees that year, it was a beautiful, wistful song about going away with friends and it worked within the movie about going away to college for the first time. 

The other nominees were:

"Jean" from The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie

title song from True Grit

"What Are You Doing The Rest Of Your Life" from The Happy Ending

I don't think "Everybody's Talkin'" from Midnight Cowboy was eligible since it was an older song not written for the film, or I would have chosen that one. One song I loved that I think would have been eligible was "Carry On Till Tomorrow" from The Magic Christian", written and performed by Badfinger.

I also remember hoping that "Come Saturday Morning" would win. However, "What Are You Doing the Rest of Your Life?" has found a home in cabaret. With the right interpreter, this is a powerful song, and it would probably be my choice now. Richard Brooks asked for a song that would sound one way at the beginning of the film and another way at the end, after the couple has split up.

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On 1/11/2021 at 12:07 PM, Sepiatone said:

In both construct lyrically and musically, I thought "Somewhere Out There" from AN AMERICAN TAIL('86)  was FAR superior to the  top 40 "pop" tripe of "Take My Breath Away" from TOP GUN('86) which, between the two, wound up with the statuette.    Heh....

And even today, they STILL try to sell us on the lie that movie popularity( which rarely translates into quality)  never plays into who or what wins an award.

Sepiatone

Its ironic in a respect because the Oscars in the 80s turned down a lot of eligible songs that were top 40 hits.

Namely:
"Magic", "Xanadu",  "All over the World", "I'm Alive", and "Suddenly"/Xanadu (Olivia Newton-John or Electric Light Orchestra)
"I'm Alright"/Caddyshack (Kenny Loggins)
"Call Me"/American Gigolo (Blondie)
"It's My Turn"/It's My Turn (Diana Ross)
"Making Love"/Making Love (Roberta Flack)
"Cat People/Putting Out Fire"/Cat People (David Bowie)
"Heaven"/ A Night in Heaven (Bryan Adams)
"All Time High"/Octopussy (Rita Coolidge)
"The Heat is On"/Beverly Hills Cop (Glen Frey)
"When Doves Cry","Purple Rain", "Let's Go Crazy" /Purple Rain (Prince)
"We Don't Need Another Hero" & "One of the Living" /Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (Tina Turner)
"A View to a Kill"/A View to a Kill (Duran Duran)
"Rhythm of the Night"/The Last Dragon (DeBarge)
"Crazy for You"/Vision Quest, "Into the Groove"/Desperately Seeking Susan, "Who's That Girl"/Who's That Girl  and "Live to Tell"/At Close Range (Madonna)
"Don't You Forget About Me"/The Breakfast Club (Simple Minds)
"Coming Around Again"/Heartburn (Carly Simon)
"If You Leave"/Pretty in Pink (OMD)
"Danger Zone"/Top Gun (Kenny Loggins)
"In Too Deep"/Mona Lisa (Genesis)
"Hungry Eyes"/ Dirty Dancing (Eric Carmen)
"Wild Wild Life"/True Stories (Talking Heads)
"Kokomo"/Cocktail (The Beach Boys)
"On Our Own"/Ghostbusters II (Bobby Brown)

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Instead of 1977's "You Light Up My Life," just about ANYTHING. Oh, what about "New York, New York" or "Staying Alive," eligible but not nominated?

Worst lyrics of an Oscar-winning song ever: strong contenders are 1978's "Last Dance"  and 1971's "Theme from Shaft."

 

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9 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Worst lyrics of an Oscar-winning song ever: strong contenders are 1978's "Last Dance"  and 1971's "Theme from Shaft."

 

Shut your mouth!

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