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Air pressure makes Mount Everest 'shrink' by thousands of feet, new study finds


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Air pressure makes Mount Everest 'shrink' by thousands of feet, new study finds

Mount Everest is the tallest mountain in the world — but sometimes, it feels like the second-tallest, according to a story reported in the American Geophysical Union's news blog Eos.

That's because the mountain's air pressure fluctuates significantly throughout the year, a recent study found, causing the summit's "perceived elevation" to occasionally dip below that of its less-lofty rival, K2 — the second-tallest mountain in the world.

"Sometimes K2 is higher than Everest," lead study author Tom Matthews, a climate scientist at Loughborough University in the United Kingdom, told Eos.

In the new study, published Dec. 18 in the journal iScience, Matthews and his colleagues looked at more than 40 years of air pressure data recorded by both weather stations near the summit of Mount Everest and the European Space Agency's Copernicus satellite.

Air pressure is closely tied to oxygen availability on Everest; when air pressure decreases, there are fewer oxygen molecules in the air, making the simple act of breathing much more strenuous, according to Eos. For this reason, many who choose to hike Everest rely on supplemental oxygen to stay on their feet as they scale to higher elevations where the air is thinner. (Only 169 men and eight women have ever summited Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen, the study authors noted.)

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For those that don't understand what this means, don't worry, it makes no sense in the real world. This is another study by a climate "scientist" trying to prove the impossible yet again just like with all the global warming studies.

PS Notice how they assume the air pressure on K2 never fluctuates to prove their "thesis".

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15 minutes ago, MovieMadness said:

Air pressure makes Mount Everest 'shrink' by thousands of feet, new study finds

Mount Everest is the tallest mountain in the world — but sometimes, it feels like the second-tallest, according to a story reported in the American Geophysical Union's news blog Eos.

That's because the mountain's air pressure fluctuates significantly throughout the year, a recent study found, causing the summit's "perceived elevation" to occasionally dip below that of its less-lofty rival, K2 — the second-tallest mountain in the world.

"Sometimes K2 is higher than Everest," lead study author Tom Matthews, a climate scientist at Loughborough University in the United Kingdom, told Eos.

In the new study, published Dec. 18 in the journal iScience, Matthews and his colleagues looked at more than 40 years of air pressure data recorded by both weather stations near the summit of Mount Everest and the European Space Agency's Copernicus satellite.

Air pressure is closely tied to oxygen availability on Everest; when air pressure decreases, there are fewer oxygen molecules in the air, making the simple act of breathing much more strenuous, according to Eos. For this reason, many who choose to hike Everest rely on supplemental oxygen to stay on their feet as they scale to higher elevations where the air is thinner. (Only 169 men and eight women have ever summited Everest without the use of supplemental oxygen, the study authors noted.)

*********************************************

For those that don't understand what this means, don't worry, it makes no sense in the real world. This is another study by a climate "scientist" trying to prove the impossible yet again just like with all the global warming studies.

PS Notice how they assume the air pressure on K2 never fluctuates to prove their "thesis".

Oh dear.   You fell victim to a click-baiting title, and apparently didn't read the whole thing.  You certainly didn't paste the whole thing, or a link.

Link: https://www.livescience.com/mount-everest-air-pressure-perceived-altitude.html

This article was only about the availability of oxygen, and that due to pressure differences, the perception of altitude (meaning, the need for supplemental oxygen) varies throughout the year.

They weren't talking about the actual height of the mountain varying, nor global warming.

Here's the very next few paragraphs, which you conveniently don't post, so that you can try to twist it to fit your purpose.  I added emphasis to show that all this was trying to state was that sometimes throughout the year, there's more oxygen available, so it feels like you're at a lower altitude.  The same principle applies when you're in an airplane.  You may be flying at 30,000 feet but the cabin is pressurized to feel like you're at 10,000 feet.  That's all this was saying.

But while air pressure reliably decreases with elevation, it also fluctuates with the weather, the study authors found. From 1979 to 2019, the air pressure near the peak of Everest ranged anywhere from 309 to 343 hectopascals — roughly one-third the pressure at sea level — depending on the season.

"Compared with the average air pressure measured on Everest in May, that span translates into a 737-meter [2,417 feet] difference in how high the summit feels from an oxygen availability standpoint," science journalist Katherine Kornei wrote in the blog.

Put another way, sometimes the oxygen availability on Everest makes the mountain feel thousands of feet shorter than it really is. Occasionally, the 29,000-foot-tall (8,800 m) mountain feels shorter (to our bodies) than the world's next tallest mountain, K2, which measures 28,250 feet (8,600 m) tall.

 

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Obviously MM was the guy in that story about the yokel, during his first airplane trip, who asked the stewardess, "Miss, how high is this airplane?"  and when she told him, "It's currently at 20,000 feet." he replied, "GOSH!  Then how WIDE is it?"  ;) 

Sepiatone

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22 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Oh dear.   You fell victim to a click-baiting title, and apparently didn't read the whole thing

Nobody can tell the difference up in the death zone on Everest. Just like we can't tell the difference between elevations of 1000 and 3000 feet.

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1 hour ago, MovieMadness said:

Nobody can tell the difference up in the death zone on Everest. Just like we can't tell the difference between elevations of 1000 and 3000 feet.

Not without proper instrumentation, which those involved in the study probably used to arrive at the conclusion.  D'OH!   :D

Sepiatone

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