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A Paramount film you'd like to see on TCM


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22 minutes ago, Ray Faiola said:

When I say "full frame" I mean prints that are "unmasked" for 1:85 as they were shown theatrically. Very often you see things outside the "safe" area, such as Spencer Tracy's mattress at the bottom of the set of THE MOUNTAIN.

If you mean how many features do I have on film, it's just over 2,500. Then there are a few thousand shorts, cartoons, serial chapters, tv shows and trailers. I have very few foreign films (M, NOSFERATU, CALIGARI, LAST LAUGH, POTEMKIN, DYBBUK and a few others). Quite a few British pictures.

Thanks for clarifying. Yeah, I meant how many you have on film. 

I've been discovering all sorts of new British films (new to me). I feel like I am learning more about the British motion picture industry each day. 

Yesterday I watched JOHNNY FRENCHMAN (1945) a charming comedy-drama that stars Patricia Roc and Francoise Rosay. I just loved it. So many great flicks that deserve an audience.

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Okay, there's a forgotten gem I saw on YouTube that I have to mention here.

It's Paramount's WIVES AND LOVERS (1963) which reunites Van Johnson & Janet Leigh. They did CONFIDENTIALLY CONNIE (1953) ten years earlier at home studio MGM and before that, Janet's very first film was THE ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE (1947) also with Van. So these two stars are very familiar and comfortable with each other on screen.

It's based on a play about marital disharmony in the suburbs, presented for laughs. The writing is way above average and the performances are sincere. It helps that we have Shelley Winters and Ray Walston in supporting roles as the neighbors. Lovely Martha Hyer, who never looked more alluring on screen, plays a woman that leads Van astray.

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 10.24.47 AM

Anyway, given the star wattage and pedigree of this material, it's one that TCM definitely should air. It would fit several different themes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wives_and_Lovers_(film)

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2 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Okay, there's a forgotten gem I saw on YouTube that I have to mention here.

It's Paramount's WIVES AND LOVERS (1963) which reunites Van Johnson & Janet Leigh. They did CONFIDENTIALLY CONNIE (1953) ten years earlier at home studio MGM and before that, Janet's very first film was THE ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE (1947) also with Van. So these two stars are very familiar and comfortable with each other on screen.

It's based on a hit Broadway play about marital disharmony in the suburbs, presented for laughs. The writing is way above average and the performances are sincere. It helps that we have Shelley Winters and Ray Walston in supporting roles as the neighbors. Lovely Martha Hyer, who never looked more alluring on screen, plays a woman that leads Van astray.

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 10.24.47 AM

Anyway, given the star wattage and pedigree of this material, it's one that TCM definitely should air. It would fit several different themes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wives_and_Lovers_(film)

Never heard of this film until now,  but it sounds like it would be entertaining.    As noted,  interesting cast,  and I always find Martha Hyer interesting and Winters and Walston make a funny duo.    Van Johnson has his hands full! 

Image result for WIVES AND LOVERS movie

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Most frequently played on TCM

(per MovieCollector's database)

DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944)...65 times
THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS (1946)...64 times
THE LADY EVE (1941)...63 times
ROMAN HOLIDAY (1954)...51 times
A PLACE IN THE SUN (1951)...50 times
THE HEIRESS (1949)...48 times
GOING MY WAY (1944)...43 times
SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS (1941)...42 times
SUNSET BLVD (1950)...41 times
SABRINA (1954)...40 times
SHE DONE HIM WRONG (1933)...27 times
HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO (1944)...24 times
AT WAR WITH THE ARMY (1950)...22 times
REMEMBER THE NIGHT (1940)...21 times

Screen Shot 2020-01-26 at 2.01.08 PM.jpeg

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On 2/2/2021 at 11:28 AM, Ray Faiola said:

Yes, in 1956 Music Corporation of America purchased the entire Paramount pre-1948 FEATURE film library and syndicated the films to local television stations. When MCA merged with Universal, which I believe was finalized in 1963, Universal became custodian of the Paramount pre-'48's. Unfortunately, the transfer of materials was somewhat haphazard and many of the Paramounts remain in very shabby condition. Paramount had a huge library with an extensive 'B' unit output. Those B's are extant almost exclusively in 16mm former station prints. The Aldrich pictures are part of that group. But, as I said, there may be a literary complication therein.

You're so right about condition issues. I had resisted mentioning Frenchman's Creek (1944) because TCM has shown it in the past, but always in a relatively faded print of what must have been a glorious Technicolor film. Universal Vault has released it to DVD, but from what I hear it's still the substandard, faded print. Ray, does the fact that Universal has "custody" of the pre-48 Paramount films mean that they have the negatives to do restorations, or do they just have prints?

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22 hours ago, TopBilled said:

Okay, there's a forgotten gem I saw on YouTube that I have to mention here.

It's Paramount's WIVES AND LOVERS (1963) which reunites Van Johnson & Janet Leigh. They did CONFIDENTIALLY CONNIE (1953) ten years earlier at home studio MGM and before that, Janet's very first film was THE ROMANCE OF ROSY RIDGE (1947) also with Van. So these two stars are very familiar and comfortable with each other on screen.

It's based on a play about marital disharmony in the suburbs, presented for laughs. The writing is way above average and the performances are sincere. It helps that we have Shelley Winters and Ray Walston in supporting roles as the neighbors. Lovely Martha Hyer, who never looked more alluring on screen, plays a woman that leads Van astray.

Screen Shot 2021-02-11 at 10.24.47 AM

Anyway, given the star wattage and pedigree of this material, it's one that TCM definitely should air. It would fit several different themes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wives_and_Lovers_(film)

I remember this film being shown on the network movies years ago, but never came upon it since. Have never seen it.

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47 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I remember this film being shown on the network movies years ago, but never came upon it since. Have never seen it.

WIVES AND LOVERS (1963) is still on YouTube, a fairly decent print.

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Just now, NipkowDisc said:

wives & lovers?

Yes, there's a scene midway into the movie where neighbor Ray Walston visits. Van Johnson's character is not home from work yet, and Ray fidgets with the stereo. Janet Leigh's character tells him he shouldn't touch it, her husband is very particular about his equipment. But then she realizes she's still mad at Van for not making it home for dinner, so she tells Ray he can mess with the stereo all he wants!

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7 hours ago, DougieB said:

You're so right about condition issues. I had resisted mentioning Frenchman's Creek (1944) because TCM has shown it in the past, but always in a relatively faded print of what must have been a glorious Technicolor film. Universal Vault has released it to DVD, but from what I hear it's still the substandard, faded print. Ray, does the fact that Universal has "custody" of the pre-48 Paramount films mean that they have the negatives to do restorations, or do they just have prints?

It's hit and miss. I believe many of the Universal/Paramount restorations are with Library of Congress materials. There have been fires and other losses of materials over the generations since the sale by Paramount of their library.

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TB's link prompted some thoughts on movies I hadn't thought of or hadn't remembered were Paramount.

I'd love to see Out of This World (1945) again. I saw it on a local TV station back in the 70's, when that was practically the only way to see older movies. It's about an all-girl band who recruit an upcoming male singer to boost their career. Eddie Bracken plays the singer, whose singing voice is dubbed by Bing Crosby, and Diana Lynn leads the band. It's good silly fun.

Speaking of Bing, I'd also love to see Just For You (1952), a musical co-starring Jane Wyman, Natalie Wood and Ethel Barrymore. Jane played a Broadway musical star and was a very credible singer in her own right. She and Bing actually had a hit single, "In the Cool Cool Cool of the Evening".  I saw it on AMC but I don't remember TCM ever showing it. 

Otto Preminger's Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (1970) was kind of a mess, but a well-meaning one whose view of diversity was ahead of its time. Good cast headed by Liza Minnelli, and a nice opportunity to see the legendary Kay Thompson on film.

I can't say how well American Hot Wax (1978) has aged, but I remember loving it at the time. It's (roughly) a biography of Alan Freed, the 1950's DJ and promoter, and features good musical numbers with actual and fictional performers. There are also early roles for Jay Leno and Fran Drescher. 

The Big Bus (1976) is a ridiculously goofy disaster movie spoof before Airplane! got credit for the genre. It's about the maiden run of a gigantic nuclear powered bus and it's fun for movie fans who are familiar with a lot of the cliches it skewers. 

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13 minutes ago, DougieB said:

TB's link prompted some thoughts on movies I hadn't thought of or hadn't remembered were Paramount.

I'd love to see Out of This World (1945) again. I saw it on a local TV station back in the 70's, when that was practically the only way to see older movies. It's about an all-girl band who recruit an upcoming male singer to boost their career. Eddie Bracken plays the singer, whose singing voice is dubbed by Bing Crosby, and Diana Lynn leads the band. It's good silly fun.

Speaking of Bing, I'd also love to see Just For You (1952), a musical co-starring Jane Wyman, Natalie Wood and Ethel Barrymore. Jane played a Broadway musical star and was a very credible singer in her own right. She and Bing actually had a hit single, "In the Cool Cool Cool of the Evening".  I saw it on AMC but I don't remember TCM ever showing it. 

Otto Preminger's Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon (1970) was kind of a mess, but a well-meaning one whose view of diversity was ahead of its time. Good cast headed by Liza Minnelli, and a nice opportunity to see the legendary Kay Thompson on film.

I can't say how well American Hot Wax (1978) has aged, but I remember loving it at the time. It's (roughly) a biography of Alan Freed, the 1950's DJ and promoter, and features good musical numbers with actual and fictional performers. There are also early roles for Jay Leno and Fran Drescher. 

The Big Bus (1976) is a ridiculously goofy disaster movie spoof before Airplane! got credit for the genre. It's about the maiden run of a gigantic nuclear powered bus and it's fun for movie fans who are familiar with a lot of the cliches it skewers. 

I think the Johnny Mercer-Hoagy Carmichael tune that you mentioned was featured in Bing & Jane's earlier Paramount rom-com HERE COMES THE GROOM (1951). But the two stars had another hit with "Zing a Little Zong" in JUST FOR YOU, which was penned by Harry Warren & Leo Robin.

OUT OF THIS WORLD (1945) is on YouTube but it's not a digitally restored print, unfortunately.

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More Paramount silents.  From skimming that Films of the 1920s list above, movies jumping out at me are "The Sheik", "Miss Lulu Bett", "Moran of the Lady Letty", "When Knighthood Was In Flower", "The Covered Wagon", "The Ten Commandments", "Sally of the Sawdust", "So's Your Old Man", "Stark Love", "Chang", "The Last Command", "The Docks of New York", "The Wedding March", and "The Four Feathers" (which apparently was the last silent film released by a major studio and which co-starred William Powell and Fay Wray).

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^All those above, of course, coming into the public domain in the next five years.

EDIT: Well, not *all* since some of them already are.  Films made in 1923 became PD last year and films made in 1924 became PD this year.

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Worth mentioning are the films that Paramount made across the pond. These are not necessarily films made in Britain that secured distribution in America through Paramount. Instead, they are ones the studio produced in Britain with "frozen funds." Sometimes these productions featured American stars, sometimes they had exclusively British casts.

Screen Shot 2021-02-16 at 1.57.51 PM

As you can see there were quite a few:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Paramount_British_films

Incidentally the term "quota quickie" is British slang for B-movie. Theaters owners in the 1930s expected a quota of B films to play as part of a double bill with the more prestigious "A" films.

Some of the more well-known Par Brit productions include:

SO EVIL MY LOVE (1948)
ANOTHER TIME ANOTHER PLACE (1958)
BECKET (1964)
THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE COLD (1965)
ALFIE (1966)
ROMEO AND JULIET (1968)
THE ITALIAN JOB (1969)

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Paramount's biggest moneymakers (1920s & 1930s)

These films placed in the top 10 of their respective years:

Screen Shot 2021-02-18 at 12.37.53 PM

THE SHEIK (1921) with Rudolph Valentino
WHEN KNIGHTHOOD WAS IN FLOWER (1922) with Marion Davies
BLOOD AND SAND (1922) with Rudolph Valentino
THE COVERED WAGON (1923) with J. Warren Kerrigan
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (1923) with Theodore Roberts
MONSIEUR BEAUCAIRE (1924) with Rudolph Valentino
BEAU GESTE (1926) with Ronald Colman
OLD IRONSIDES (1926) with Charles Farrell
THE WAY OF ALL FLESH (1926) with Emil Jannings
WINGS (1928) with Clara Bow
WELCOME DANGER (1929) with Harold Lloyd

______

ANIMAL CRACKERS (1930) with the Marx Brothers
DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE (1932) with Fredric March
ONE HOUR WITH YOU (1932) with Maurice Chevalier
I'M NO ANGEL (1933) with Mae West
SHE DONE HIM WRONG (1933) with Mae West
CLEOPATRA (1934) with Claudette Colbert
BELLE OF THE NINETIES (1934) with Mae West
THE CRUSADES (1935) with Loretta Young
THE LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER (1935) with Gary Cooper
THE PLAINSMAN (1936) with Gary Cooper
IF I WERE KING (1938) with Ronald Colman

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Paramount's biggest moneymakers (1940s & 1950s)

These films placed in the top 10 of their respective years:

Screen Shot 2021-02-18 at 12.37.53 PM

NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE (1940) with Gary Cooper
LOUISIANA PURCHASE (1941) with Bob Hope
CAUGHT IN THE DRAFT (1941) with Bob Hope
ROAD TO ZANZIBAR (1941) with Bob Hope
NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (1941) with Bob Hope
ROAD TO MOROCCO (1942) with Bob Hope
HOLIDAY INN (1942) with Bing Crosby
REAP THE WILD WIND (1942) with Ray Milland
WAKE ISLAND (1942) with Brian Donlevy
STAR SPANGLED RHYTHM (1942) with Betty Hutton

FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS (1943) with Gary Cooper
DIXIE (1943) with Bing Crosby
GOING MY WAY (1944) with Bing Crosby
FRENCHMAN'S CREEK (1944) with Joan Fontaine
THE LOST WEEKEND (1945) with Ray Milland
BLUE SKIES (1946) with Bing Crosby
ROAD TO UTOPIA (1946) with Bob Hope
WELCOME STRANGER (1947) with Bing Crosby
UNCONQUERED (1947) with Gary Cooper
ROAD TO RIO (1947) with Bob Hope
THE PALEFACE (1948) with Bob Hope
THE EMPEROR WALTZ (1948) with Bing Crosby
SORROWFUL JONES (1949) with Bob Hope
SAMSON AND DELILAH (1949) with Hedy Lamarr

______

THAT'S MY BOY (1951) with Jerry Lewis
THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH (1952) with Betty Hutton
JUMPING JACKS (1952) with Jerry Lewis
COME BACK LITTLE SHEBA (1952) with Shirley Booth
SON OF PALEFACE (1952) with Bob Hope
SHANE (1953) with Alan Ladd
REAR WINDOW (1954) with James Stewart
WHITE CHRISTMAS (1954) with Bing Crosby
THE COUNTRY GIRL (1954) with Bing Crosby
STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND (1955) with James Stewart
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (1956) with Charlton Heston
WAR AND PEACE (1956) with Audrey Hepburn
GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL (1957) with Burt Lancaster

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1 hour ago, TopBilled said:

Paramount's biggest moneymakers (1940s & 1950s)

These films placed in the top 10 of their respective years:

Screen Shot 2021-02-18 at 12.37.53 PM

NORTH WEST MOUNTED POLICE (1940) with Gary Cooper
LOUISIANA PURCHASE (1941) with Bob Hope
CAUGHT IN THE DRAFT (1941) with Bob Hope
ROAD TO ZANZIBAR (1941) with Bob Hope
NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH (1941) with Bob Hope
ROAD TO MOROCCO (1942) with Bob Hope
HOLIDAY INN (1942) with Bing Crosby
REAP THE WILD WIND (1942) with Ray Milland
WAKE ISLAND (1942) with Brian Donlevy
STAR SPANGLED RHYTHM (1942) with Betty Hutton

FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS (1943) with Gary Cooper
DIXIE (1943) with Bing Crosby
GOING MY WAY (1944) with Bing Crosby
FRENCHMAN'S CREEK (1944) with Joan Fontaine
THE LOST WEEKEND (1945) with Ray Milland
BLUE SKIES (1946) with Bing Crosby
ROAD TO UTOPIA (1946) with Bob Hope
WELCOME STRANGER (1947) with Bing Crosby
UNCONQUERED (1947) with Gary Cooper
ROAD TO RIO (1947) with Bob Hope
THE PALEFACE (1948) with Bob Hope
THE EMPEROR WALTZ (1948) with Bing Crosby
SORROWFUL JONES (1949) with Bob Hope
SAMSON AND DELILAH (1949) with Hedy Lamarr

______

THAT'S MY BOY (1951) with Jerry Lewis
THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH (1952) with Betty Hutton
JUMPING JACKS (1952) with Jerry Lewis
COME BACK LITTLE SHEBA (1952) with Shirley Booth
SON OF PALEFACE (1952) with Bob Hope
SHANE (1953) with Alan Ladd
REAR WINDOW (1954) with James Stewart
WHITE CHRISTMAS (1954) with Bing Crosby
THE COUNTRY GIRL (1954) with Bing Crosby
STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND (1955) with James Stewart
THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (1956) with Charlton Heston
WAR AND PEACE (1956) with Audrey Hepburn
GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL (1957) with Burt Lancaster

Do you mean the top 10 of Paramount releases that year or all studios?

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58 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Do you mean the top 10 of Paramount releases that year or all studios?

All studios.

On wiki, for each year in film, they list the Top 10 moneymakers in Hollywood. 

In 1939 for example, Paramount had no films in the Top 10 that year. 

But in 1941, Paramount had four films in the Top 10 (each one starred Bob Hope).

Make sense?

***

Going back to 1939 for a moment, it is possible that #11 was a Paramount film, but wiki only lists the top ten. Paramount released 58 feature films in 1939. Of course some of them probably turned a profit but none of them were huge moneymakers. My guess is that UNION PACIFIC (1939) and BEAU GESTE (1939) were just outside the top ten.

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Before I go on and do the 60s and 70s, I wanted to mention that SAMSON AND DELILAH had a preview at the end of December '49 to qualify it for the Oscars. But it was not released nationwide until mid-January. It is considered a 1949 film so that's how I listed it. But basically it earned all its revenue in 1950. It was the number one moneymaker of the year, one of Paramount's most successful movies up to that point. It won two Oscars so the strategy of previewing it in December paid off.

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Paramount's biggest moneymakers (1960s & 1970s)

These films placed in the top 10 of their respective years:

Screen Shot 2021-02-18 at 12.37.53 PM

PSYCHO (1960) with Anthony Perkins
THE WORLD OF SUZIE WONG (1960) with William Holden
HATARI! (1962) with John Wayne
COME BLOW YOUR HORN (1963) with Frank Sinatra
THE CARPETBAGGERS (1964) with George Peppard
ALFIE (1966) with Michael Caine
ROSEMARY'S BABY (1968) with Mia Farrow
THE ODD COUPLE (1968) with Jack Lemmon
ROMEO AND JULIET (1968) with Olivia Hussey
PAINT YOUR WAGON (1969) with Clint Eastwood
GOODBYE COLUMBUS (1969) with Ali MacGraw
TRUE GRIT (1969) with John Wayne

______

LOVE STORY (1970) with Ali MacGraw
CATCH-22 (1970) with Alan Arkin
THE GODFATHER (1972) with Marlon Brando
LADY SINGS THE BLUES (1972) with Diana Ross
PAPER MOON (1973) with Ryan O'Neal
THE GODFATHER PART II (1974) with Al Pacino
THE LONGEST YARD (1974) with Burt Reynolds
MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (1974) with Albert Finney
THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR (1975) with Robert Redford
KING KONG (1976) with Jessica Lange
THE BAD NEWS BEARS (1976) with Walter Matthau
SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER (1977) with John Travolta
GREASE (1978) with John Travolta
UP IN SMOKE (1978) with Cheech Marin
HEAVEN CAN WAIT (1978) with Warren Beatty
STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE (1979) with William Shatner

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