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A Paramount film you'd like to see on TCM


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My choice would be "Une heure pres de toi." It is the simultaneously shot French version of "One Hour With You."

I am not sure any prints exist, though.

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5 hours ago, cody1949 said:

And 2 Paramount silent classics:

    BEGGARS OF LIFE

   UNDERWORLD

Not quite the same, but Beggars of Life is on Blu-ray from Kino, and Underworld from Criterion. Both are magnificent films.

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Yes, I know.  I have them both, Not everybody can afford to be a collector and it would be nice for them to see these rare titles on TCM.

While I am here posting, let me mention another marvelous  little Paramount film that no one has mentioned yet. If you love dog stories, then  THE BISCUIT EATER is for you.

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On 3/19/2021 at 6:08 PM, TopBilled said:

Yeah, BEAU JAMES is a forgotten film. I don't think it's ever aired on TCM.

No it has not.  Neither has another lost Bob Hope film, THAT CERTAIN FEELING. I recorded them at SP over thirty years ago and still have the VHS tapes! I played them recently for the first time in at least 20 years and they looked pretty good.  BEAU JAMES had the Bob Dorian wrap-arounds!

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8 hours ago, yanceycravat said:

No it has not.  Neither has another lost Bob Hope film, THAT CERTAIN FEELING. I recorded them at SP over thirty years ago and still have the VHS tapes! I played them recently for the first time in at least 20 years and they looked pretty good.  BEAU JAMES had the Bob Dorian wrap-arounds!

I also copied them from the AMC channel, but on 6 hr. mode. They look pretty good, though.

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  • 3 months later...

I'd like to see more Paramount films from the 1930s on TCM...more than just Mae West movies. 

Like all those wonderful pictures that Sylvia Sidney made early in her career.

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6 hours ago, skimpole said:

From the seventies:

Waterloo

The Red Tent

Save the Tiger

Don't Look Now

Daisy Miller

The Tenant

The Memory of Justice

1900

North Dallas Forty

Good list! THE TENANT is currently on Hulu.

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I managed to buy Saigon and The Great Gatsby on DVD on line not the greatest copies though.

 

ad to have Saigon though the last film  Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake made together.

 

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Enen thought its a bad film TCM should show Won Ton Ton, The Dog Who Saved Hollywood.  It stars Madeline Kahn, Bruce Dern, Art Carney and Teri Garr and has cameos with many old stars from the golden age of Hollywood.  Madeline Kahn makes the best of what she can because she was so brillant, but she hated this movie.  

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11 minutes ago, Dommy said:

I managed to buy Saigon and The Great Gatsby on DVD on line not the greatest copies though.

 

ad to have Saigon though the last film  Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake made together.

 

What did you think about SAIGON (1948)..? I've been curious about it for years.

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I just watched a fun Paramount film on Hulu -- PLAZA SUITE (1971).  TCM has aired it before but it's been ages.

Back in 2015 and 2010 before that.

Lee Grant is fantastic in it.

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These four PARAMOUNT movies I've never seen; I don't believe any of them have been issued on homevideo in any format . . . or I'd have bought them all if I'd found them.  

LAWYER, The (1970) 

UNMAN, WITTERING and ZIGO (1971-UK)

BEEN DOWN SO LONG IT LOOKS LIKE UP TO ME (1971) 

SHEILA LEVINE IS DEAD AND LIVING IN NEW YORK (1975)

 

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12 hours ago, Mr. Gorman said:

These four PARAMOUNT movies I've never seen; I don't believe any of them have been issued on homevideo in any format . . . or I'd have bought them all if I'd found them.  

LAWYER, The (1970) 

UNMAN, WITTERING and ZIGO (1971-UK)

BEEN DOWN SO LONG IT LOOKS LIKE UP TO ME (1971) 

SHEILA LEVINE IS DEAD AND LIVING IN NEW YORK (1975)

About 10 years ago, when studios were trying to figure out how to use YouTube to their advantage, Paramount had a channel on YT that featured several different Paramount and Republic films each month, commercial free. Gradually they stopped doing that, and started to use the channel for clips to promote new releases.

I think today it's evolved into Paramount Network and Paramount Plus, two subscription based channels on YT.

Anyway, the reason they did this was to see what sort of interest there might be in obscure gems, because these titles hadn't been put on home video in any form.

One of the free movies that they streamed on their channel for a month was SHEILA LEVINE and that is how I finally saw it. I loved it. Jeannie Berlin should have been a bigger star!

According to MovieCollector's database, SHEILA LEVINE did air once on TCM, back in 2015.

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14 hours ago, TopBilled said:

What did you think about SAIGON (1948)..? I've been curious about it for years.

Saigon is an ok movie, but its watchable be more watchable if the quality is clear.  That is the problem with most of the old Paramount movie mostly poor quality copies are only available.  Its a shame so many classic movies that are lost.

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So last night when I had insomnia I started devising my Paramount must-see list. But I decided that it might be easier to create little sub-categories because this studio has been cranking them out since 1914. 

How should I categorize them?

  • Genre: westerns, screwball comedy, precodes, silent films, noir, action flicks, horror films, animation, musicals, etc.
  • Decade: 1910s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s (probably the studio's best decade), 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, 2010s, 2020s
  • Directors: Cecil DeMille, Ernst Lubitsch, Mitchell Leisen, Preston Sturges, Billy Wilder, etc.
  • Studio era teams: Hope & Crosby, Ladd & Lake, Martin & Lewis, Colbert & MacMurray, Goddard & Milland, etc.
  • Blockbuster franchises: Mission Impossible, The Addams Family, The Bad News Bears, Friday the 13th, Star Trek, Indiana Jones, Iron Man, Spy Kids, Naked Gun, Beverly Hills Cop, Crocodile Dundee, The Godfather, Jack Ryan

Paramount has had over 100 years of continuous motion picture production.

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I'm sorry I missed the TCM screening of "Sheila Levine" in 2015.  → If TCM ever shows it again I will be sure and watch it.  At least the movie itself isn't lost in a salt mine. 

Now maybe Paramount can dig up "Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me" . . . maybe that one is lost in a film vault somewhere. 

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14 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

I'm sorry I missed the TCM screening of "Sheila Levine" in 2015.  → If TCM ever shows it again I will be sure and watch it.  At least the movie itself isn't lost in a salt mine. 

Now maybe Paramount can dig up "Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me" . . . maybe that one is lost in a film vault somewhere. 

I knew someone who had worked at Paramount around 2015. From my understanding, the studio spent the better part of five years digitally restoring Paramount classics and Republic Pictures classics (since Paramount controls that library). In addition to studio film preservation, I would imagine that restoring something like SHEILA LEVINE justified leasing it to TCM for a special airing. 

Hopefully it'll be scheduled again so more folks can watch it.

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On 3/19/2021 at 9:08 PM, TopBilled said:

Yeah, BEAU JAMES is a forgotten film. I don't think it's ever aired on TCM.

I don't believe so and it's a very interesting movie and a different turn for Bob Hope.  It has a wonderful cast including:  Paul Douglas, Alexis Smith and Vera Miles.  I think AMC used to occasionally show it but I'm sure you're right, it has not shown on TCM.

 

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Last year I did something called Winter Under the Stars where each day during the winter season, I spotlighted a star that was underplayed on TCM

I think this year I am going to do something called A Paramount Winter, which will occur on this thread.

From December 20th through March 20th, I am going to spotlight a few different Paramount films each day for 92 days. Some of these do air on TCM but most of them do not and the ones that are broadcast on TCM are seldom broadcast.

During the upcoming 13 weeks of winter, there will be a different category each day:

Mondays...Decades (1910s, 1920s, 1930s, 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s Part 1, 1970s Part 2, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s, 2010s, 2020s)
Tuesdays...Genres (Silent films, Precodes, Screwball Comedies, Romance Dramas, Musicals, War films, Action-Adventure flicks, Film Noir, Westerns, Science Fiction, Horror films, Animated features, Literary Adaptations)
Wednesdays...Studio Era Directors (Cecil DeMille, Ernst Lubitsch, Dorothy Arzner, Josef von Sternberg, Henry Hathaway, Norman Taurog, Elliott Nugent, Mitchell Leisen, Preston Sturges, Billy Wilder, John Farrow, Lewis Allen, Daniel Mann)
Thursdays...Studio Era Stars (Claudette Colbert, George Raft, Carole Lombard, Fred MacMurray, Dorothy Lamour, Bing Crosby, Martha Raye, Bob Hope, Paulette Goddard, Ray Milland, Betty Hutton, Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake)
Fridays...Best Picture Nominees (From 1927 to 1981)
Saturdays...Special Presentations (British Paramount, Hal Wallis Productions, TV movies, Short animated films by the Fleischers, Documentary films; Direct-to-video, Melvin Frank & Norman Panama, Walter Wanger Productions, Neil Simon adaptations, Elvis Presley, W.C. Fields & Baby LeRoy, Robert Evans, Sherry Lansing)
Sundays...Franchises (Hopalong Cassidy, Bulldog Drummond, The Aldrich Family, Road to..., The Bad News Bears, Star Trek, Friday the 13th, Indiana Jones, The Naked Gun, Jack Ryan, Mission: Impossible, Transformers, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles)

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Dear Ruth (1947) based on Norman Krasna's  Broadway smash comedy.  Starring William Holden, Joan Caulfield and Mona Freeman (who steals the show!) in the big Hollywood hit that was followed by 2 sequels Dear Wife (1949) and Dear Brat (1951).

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9 minutes ago, filmnoirguy said:

Dear Ruth (1947) based on Norman Krasna's  Broadway smash comedy.  Starring William Holden, Joan Caulfield and Mona Freeman (who steals the show!).  Also a big Hollywood hit that was followed by 2 sequels Dear Wife (1949) and Dear Brat (1951).

Yes, these were on Netflix about ten years ago and that is how I saw them. Holden & Caulfield are great...but as you say Freeman steals it, along with Billy DeWolfe.

DEAR RUTH, the first one, is the only one that's ever aired on TCM...just once, back in 2018.

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Okay, thought I'd update readers...

I looked at all of Paramount's best picture nominees from 1927 to 1981. What's interesting here is that Paramount was the first studio to win the Oscar for Best Picture, for WINGS in '27. Its nominee for 1928, THE PATRIOT, is lost. But every other nominee survives. 

Paramount had three films released in 1932 up for Best Picture. But none of them won.

From 1936 to 1940, a five-year period, no Paramount films were nominated for Best Picture. Similarly, the years 1946, 1947and 1948 saw no Paramount films nominated for Best Picture. And there were no Best Picture nominations from 1957 to 1963. 

Two films by the same director (Francis Ford Coppola) were nominated in 1974. 

***

I've started looking at films the studio released during the 1910s. Jesse Lasky's Famous Players company, a forerunner of Paramount, began releasing features in 1912. But the first film with the Paramount name on it did not occur until 1914, and it is lost. Ironically it's called THE LOST PARADISE. The first surviving film with the Paramount name on it is the 1914 adaptation of THE VIRGINIAN, which the studio would remake a few more times.

A lot of films made in the 1910s were based on hit stage plays or well-known stories. Many of these early Paramount silent films would be remade later when sound came in, and remade with Technicolor in the late 30s, 40s and 50s. The studio was good at recycling these properties.

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