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"All those people are dead now"


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5 hours ago, Rudy's Girl said:

I come from a family of movie buffs, on my mom's side. There's something special about classic film. I don't know why exactly. I love all kinds of movies from different eras, but there's something romantic about a black-and-white movie. I love looking at the clothes they used to wear and the cars, and even the prices of things. To me age has no bearing on what's good. It will be good forever.

I feel sorry for others my age and younger because many of them will never know how great "old" movies are. When I was in school some of the kids would spit on a movie if it wasn't in color. I would roll my eyes and think, "Idiot. What do you know?" My love for classic movies and actors, coupled with my age, makes me feel unique.

I just looked over my fav actor/actress list and I think all of them are dead except for two. Harrison Ford and Sigourney Weaver, and they're not exactly spry. I don't care for current actors as much.

I used to be quite the entertainment buff, read magazines and watch entertainment news shows. I’ve been so out of touch with current tv and movies that when the Golden Globes were announced, I didn’t know 90% of the nominees and hadn’t seen any of the work.  Classic movies and tv is what we watch. 

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2 hours ago, HelenBaby2 said:

I used to be quite the entertainment buff, read magazines and watch entertainment news shows. I’ve been so out of touch with current tv and movies that when the Golden Globes were announced, I didn’t know 90% of the nominees and hadn’t seen any of the work.  Classic movies and tv is what we watch. 

I stopped watching the Oscars years ago. The first reason being I didn't know any of the movies that were nominated. Also, I almost always would disagree with the winners. I don't even keep up with it anymore. I have a book on the history of the Oscars that stops at 2007. That's about as current as I get. 

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Y'know, the watching of "old" (or classic) movies sparked another interest in me.  For instance....

I'd keep seeing the same men or women in various older movies and in several differing genres.  And my curiosity was piqued.  "Who IS that guy?"  I'd ask myself..  "I see him in so many different movies and I've even seen him in a lot of TV shows when I was growing up!"   

And thus began my interest in all those wonderfully  talented(oft times more so than the "star" of the movie) CHARACTER ACTORS.  B)  I'll sometimes sit through some studio era flick or some '50's and '60's TV show on the lookout for who might show up!  ;)   Who will it be?  FRANK McHUGH?   AL JENKINS?  CHARLES LANE?   Or the occasional PERCY HELTON?  Well, mostly on TV I'll spot DABS GREER in a variety of roles and in a variety of genres.  ;)  And I've seen these guys(and more) in more movies that many of the "stars" I've seen plenty of over the years.  I've grown up with THEM more than Gable, bogey or Jimmy (either one) .  Oh, and BURT MUSTIN too!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have kinda' winced mentally when  I see Vic Morrow in "Bad News Bears" and know what's coming in his future. Or James Dean, Jayne Mansfield, Carole Lombard, etc.

You wish you could jump thru the screen and cut them off from their fate.

"Hey Vic, when you get a call about "Twilight Zone: The Movie," pass on it!

 

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I'm the same, Rudy's Girl. I don't give two drips about the award shows anymore. I did. I used to. But there is definitely something lacking in today's moviemaking. Or most of it. There are gems that do come from time to time. But I am sour on Hollywood. Seems like they are running out of ideas. There are so many sequels, prequels, remakes, reboots, etc. 

We will never see the great icons of film again like we did. Granted, people like Denzel, Hanks, etc. are great, great actors. But I dont think they will hold icon status like Tracy, Poitier, etc. I think that time has forever passed.

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I do take these films not just as history lessons but life lessons, art,  and I am reminded daily that they have very few stars who could do half of what these of the 30’s, 40’s, 50’s and some in the silent era have done. I cling dearly to their treasures left behind. I notice everything and everyone. I take time to research an actor to find out about other work they did.

My favorite silent star is Lon Chaney. No one, not even today ( without special effects) can do what he did on film. I’m in awe, every time I see his movies. 
 

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I'm never clear as to what reality people think they're bringing up to fans by pointing to the mortality of the filmmakers.

Do they think they're going to meet or befriend live movie stars at some point, so why watch people who are talented, but gone? And is the idea of co-existing with actors the charm of watching movies to such people?

Not even the wonderful cast of "Black Panther" has remained untouched by tragedy.  Does that mean it's a time-waster for people who enjoy such material to watch, or is it too old? 

So many questions...😁

Spoiler: Don't queue for the Mona Lisa, she's dead.

 

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1 hour ago, Leighcat said:

I'm never clear as to what reality people think they're bringing up to fans by pointing to the mortality of the filmmakers.

Do they think they're going to meet or befriend live movie stars at some point, so why watch people who are talented, but gone? And is the idea of co-existing with actors the charm of watching movies to such people?

Not even the wonderful cast of "Black Panther" has remained untouched by tragedy.  Does that mean it's a time-waster for people who enjoy such material to watch, or is it too old? 

So many questions...😁

Spoiler: Don't queue for the Mona Lisa, she's dead.

 

And she's a lot smaller than you might think.  Bring binoculars if you're stuck behind the crowd...

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9 hours ago, Leighcat said:

I'm never clear as to what reality people think they're bringing up to fans by pointing to the mortality of the filmmakers.

Do they think they're going to meet or befriend live movie stars at some point, so why watch people who are talented, but gone? And is the idea of co-existing with actors the charm of watching movies to such people?

Not even the wonderful cast of "Black Panther" has remained untouched by tragedy.  Does that mean it's a time-waster for people who enjoy such material to watch, or is it too old? 

So many questions...😁

Spoiler: Don't queue for the Mona Lisa, she's dead.

 

I find your reaction puzzling, to be honest. Nobody in the thread said "Don't watch a film because all the actors or behind-the-scenes people are dead." Or don't look at the Mona Lisa (if she is based on one real person) because she's dead..

It's a point worth bringing up (their mortality) when discussing the historical value of films. This is ongoing. These are cultural artifacts.

However, it does not mean we can expect people to look at these films in the same way others did when they were first made and released for exhibition. That would be unrealistic.

When my aunt told my grandparents "all those people are dead" she was not saying don't watch. She was saying they're gone, we're the survivors, and we look at what came before.

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Sho' 'nuff TOP.

If I were to adopt that attitude with movies and other areas of the arts, I'd have to.......

Scrap most of my book library, dump all my classical music CDs, 

2/3 of my jazz, and blues and......

1/2 of my rock'n'roll collection.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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11 hours ago, TopBilled said:

 

When my aunt told my grandparents "all those people are dead" she was not saying don't watch. She was saying they're gone, we're the survivors, and we look at what came before.

I wasn't specifically meaning your aunt, but people who do imply that things from the past are not relevant to their or anyone else's edification or entertainment. We've all met them. And they usually do say it like that--with a diminishing tone.

 

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10 minutes ago, Leighcat said:

I wasn't specifically meaning your aunt, but people who do imply that things from the past are not relevant to their or anyone else's edification or entertainment. We've all met them. And they usually do say it like that--with a diminishing tone.

Thanks for explaining what you meant.

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On 2/27/2021 at 8:43 PM, Leighcat said:

I wasn't specifically meaning your aunt, but people who do imply that things from the past are not relevant to their or anyone else's edification or entertainment. We've all met them. And they usually do say it like that--with a diminishing tone.

 

There are some of those here.  

For instance,  a while back in another thread,  there were a couple of people who griped about the '70's sitcom "Maude" as being "dated".   Which anyone should have supposed any sitcom from 40 years ago would be.    It's simple really;

Nobody should really expect a movie or TV show from the distant past( or even recent)  to be "relevant" to the times in which they are viewed.  That they aren't is often the very reason why some people enjoy watching them.   Those dismissive people LEIGHCAT mentions are of course, free to watch or refuse to watch anything they please.  But should not expect everyone else to jump on their bandwagon.   

Sepiatone

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10 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

There are some of those here.  

For instance,  a while back in another thread,  there were a couple of people who griped about the '70's sitcom "Maude" as being "dated".   Which anyone should have supposed any sitcom from 40 years ago would be.    It's simple really;

Nobody should really expect a movie or TV show from the distant past( or even recent)  to be "relevant" to the times in which they are viewed.  That they aren't is often the very reason why some people enjoy watching them.   Those dismissive people LEIGHCAT mentions are of course, free to watch or refuse to watch anything they please.  But should not expect everyone else to jump on their bandwagon.   

Sepiatone

Your above line which I highlighted here Sepia could be or probably is one of the very factors which make classic movies, "classic". The idea that in many regards the better movies ever made and regardless what era they might have been made in, will usually contain timeless examples of the human condition and then explore them.

(...and I have to say that I always feel somewhat sorry for anyone who for whatever reason are unable to either see those timeless examples in the movies they might watch, or worse still, refuse to watch because of their preconceived notions of them being "dated" and/or only watch movies to be "entertained" and resist those that are or might be thought-provoking)

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I can't recall the title of the movie yesterday afternoon, but it dealt with a pregnant woman and her (supposedly) killer husband, but it did show many actual babies in it and since the movie was made in 1940, I supposed both that if all those babies were still alive they were in their 80's now, and then wondered, since not everyone survives for that long, how many of those WERE still living?  :huh:

Sepiatone

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  • 4 months later...
On 2/22/2021 at 7:01 AM, KidChaplin said:

I have kinda' winced mentally when  I see Vic Morrow in "Bad News Bears" and know what's coming in his future. Or James Dean, Jayne Mansfield, Carole Lombard, etc.

You wish you could jump thru the screen and cut them off from their fate.

"Hey Vic, when you get a call about "Twilight Zone: The Movie," pass on it!

 

@KidChaplin  I really wish more people were able to readily name Myca and Renee, as well as Vic Morrow. Oh, well… 

Plus fools on the internet, Renee Chen didn’t have a wee-wee and it was 1982 so using child actor for her instead of child actress is anachronistic. 

Then again, Tarantino has gotten **** for his recent Manson Family film remembering that more than Sharon Tate died in that home and that she is not the only one that died that matters. Again, oh, well…

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Really enjoyed reading everyone's replies so far...

For me, I feel like I can relate a little to what everyone has said. And for reference to my feelings, I was born in '91.

 @TopBilled, my wife and I constantly discuss some of your points. Who were some of the people in these films, especially the lesser known cast? What were their lives like? We often find ourselves on IMDB trying to figure out who they are/were. One of the most recent was a carhop in the film Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967). It ended up being Alexandra Hay, who passed at 46.

I don't even know where I'm going with this...just I enjoy actors in the classics so much more than 90 percent of today's films. Sucks to see the golden age go...as someone mentioned Kirk Douglas. That one was really tough on me as one of my favorite classics is 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

As cheesy as it sounds...While our favorites may be gone, and they may only be a shadow on film, they will live on forever to us. 

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

Re: "All those people are dead now"

Old age is a leading cause of death. ;)

Want to blame someone...

073c1e0d615a6f11ae691f85ebab4c91.jpg

One of favorite lines from a comedian whose name I can't remember, 

"Half of all marriages end in divorce.  The other half ends in death. Hope I'm one of the lucky ones."

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14 minutes ago, Citizen Ed said:

One of favorite lines from a comedian whose name I can't remember, 

"Half of all marriages end in divorce.  The other half ends in death. Hope I'm one of the lucky ones."

Richard Jeni but his exact quote was...It is a sad fact that 50 percent of marriages in this country end in divorce. But hey, the other half end in death. You could be one of the lucky ones

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On 2/10/2021 at 3:10 PM, TopBilled said:

THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS (1946).. . . . Aunt Jan and I did not have the easiest relationship but we had our own strange endearing (enduring?) affection for one another. Of course, I would never have caused her death down a flight of stairs.

Screen Shot 2020-02-05 at 4.10.16 PM.jpeg

Of course you wouldn't,  but I'll bet she always thought twice about leading the way down a staircase.

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There  needs  to  be  an  Hall  of  Fame  for  movie  stars.  Sports  and  Rock  in Roll  have  their  Halls  of  Fame. I would  like  to  see an  museum  created  for  the  motion  picture  arts. It  would  also  help ,  if  there  more  roles  in  movies  for  aging  stars.  The  only  way  you  get  to see  Jack  Nicholson  these  days  is  courtside  at  a  Laker  game.

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2 hours ago, hamradio said:

Richard Jeni but his exact quote was...It is a sad fact that 50 percent of marriages in this country end in divorce. But hey, the other half end in death. You could be one of the lucky ones

Yes! Richard Jeni! Thank you, it was driving me nuts trying to remember his name!

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7 hours ago, Drewberry said:

my wife and I constantly discuss some of your points. Who were some of the people in these films, especially the lesser known cast? What were their lives like? We often find ourselves on IMDB trying to figure out who they are/were. One of the most recent was a carhop in the film Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967). It ended up being Alexandra Hay, who passed at 46.

I do this type of "research" all the time, too! Actually, I think I do it too often and neglect the things I should really be doing. 🙄

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