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Favorite Film By These Directors #3


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Another ten directors:

1. Woody Allen

2. Roger Corman

3. Andre DeToth

4. Blake Edwards

5. David Fincher

6. Sam Fuller

7. Mervyn LeRoy

8. Penny Marshall

9. Norman Z McLeod

10. Ronald Neame

here's mine:

1. Woody Allen Take The Money And Run (1969)

2. Roger Corman The Masque Of The Red Death (1964)

3. Andre DeToth House Of Wax (1953)

4. Blake Edwards Experiment In Terror (1963)

5. David Fincher Zodiac (2007)

6. Sam Fuller The Naked Kiss (1964)

7. Mervyn LeRoy The Bad Seed (1956)

8. Penny Marshall Awakenings (1990)

9. Norman Z McLeod Horse Feathers (1932)

10. Ronald Neame The Poseidon Adventure (1972)

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1. Woody Allen Radio  Days (1987)

2. Roger Corman The Undead (1957)

3. Andre De Toth  House of Wax (1953) 

6. Sam Fuller Pickup on South Street (1953)

7. Mervyn Leroy Anthony Adverse (1936)

9. Norman Z. McLeod Horse Feathers (1932)

10. Ronald Neame  The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969)

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Screen Shot 2021-02-28 at 9.48.57 AM

1. Woody Allen...INTERIORS (1978) 

2. Roger Corman ..THE TOMB OF LIGEIA (1964)

3. Andre DeToth..DAY OF THE OUTLAW (1959) A great western noir.

4. Blake Edwards..THE TAMARIND SEED (1974) A perfectly realized cold war romance drama.

5. David Fincher..SEVEN (1995)

6. Sam Fuller..PICKUP ON SOUTH STREET (1953)

7. Mervyn LeRoy..HOME BEFORE DARK (1958)

8. Penny Marshall..THE PREACHER'S WIFE (1996) Not her best but I still enjoy it.

9. Norman Z McLeod..THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (1947)

10. Ronald Neame..TUNES OF GLORY (1960)

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1. Woody Allen - Zelig (1983)

2. Roger Corman - A Bucket of Blood (1959)

3. Andre DeToth - Slattery's Hurricane (1949)

4. Blake Edwards - Victor Victoria (1982)

5. David Fincher - Gone Girl (2014)

6. Sam Fuller - Merrill's Marauders (1962)

7. Mervyn LeRoy - Mister Roberts (1955)

8. Penny Marshall - The Preacher's Wife (1996)

9. Norman Z McLeod - My Favorite Spy (1951)

10. Ronald Neame - Gambit (1966)

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Just now, Det Jim McLeod said:

I have never seen this one and hope it is shown again soon. I was on a Woody Allen drama kick lately

I was going to include the comment "I prefer Woody Allen's dramas" but then I realized that sounded like I was referring to his personal life and his problems Mia and Ronan Farrow!

INTERIORS is fantastic...extraordinary cast...I feel like he's really trying to say something about the human condition. Without this film, HANNAH AND HER SISTERS would not be as poignant and soul-searching as it is.

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1. Woody Allen - Midnight in Paris (2011)

2. Roger Corman - A Bucket of Blood (1959)

3. Andre DeToth - House of Wax (1953)

4. Blake Edwards - Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)

5. David Fincher - Se7en (1995)

6. Sam Fuller - Pickup on South Street (1953)

7. Mervyn LeRoy - Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933)

8. Penny Marshall - Big (1988)

9. Norman Z. McLeod - Horse Feathers (1932)

10. Ronald Neame - The Chalk Garden (1964)

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1. Woody Allen - Broadway Danny Rose

2. Roger Corman - The Trip (only one seen)

3. Andre De Toth - Day of the Outlaw

4. Blake Edwards - Days of Wine and Roses

5. David Fincher - The Social Network (only one seen)

6. Samuel Fuller - Pickup on South Street

7. Mervyn LeRoy - Heat Lightning

8. Penny Marshall - Awakenings

9. Norman Z. McLeod - Monkey Business

10. Ronald Neame - The Horse's Mouth

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1 minute ago, kingrat said:

And thank you, Det. Jim, for another of these fun lists. The eclectic mix of directors is part of the fun.

Glad you like them. When I saw your Blake Edwards choice it made me realize how much I liked his dramas more than his more popular comedies. The Trip is one of Corman's best, a good mix of exploitation and experimental cinema.

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1. Woody Allen- I think I've only seen Annie Hall, and I would NOT consider that film a favorite.  Honestly, I didn't get what all the fuss was about.

2. Roger Corman- The Wasp Woman

3. Andre DeToth- Crime Wave

4. Blake Edwards- Breakfast at Tiffanys

5. David Fincher- I guess I'd pick Fight Club.  His films aren't really my favorite.

6. Sam Fuller- Pickup on South Street

7. Mervyn LeRoy- Golddiggers of 1933

8. Penny Marshall- A League of Their Own

9. Norman Z McLeod- Horse Feathers

10. Ronald Neame- The Poseidon Adventure

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1.  Woody Allen - Funny Era:  Love and Death,  Fellini/Bergman Plagiarism Era:  Radio Days (or Amarcord Brooklyn)

2. Roger Corman - Masque of the Red Death

3. Andre deToth - House of Wax 3D

4. Blake Edwards - Victor/Victoria (still suspiciously gay and/or unnaturally obsessed with drag clubs, but at least he kept his mind on the stylistic 20's French-farce pastiche...To think for years, studios couldn't find someone to direct a movie of Broadway's La Cage Aux Folles musical.)

5. David Fincher - I was about to say the Rolling Stones' "Love is Strong" video, since I don't like his cult-geek films, and Alien 3 was meh, but then I forgot he directed Zodiac.

7.  Mervyn LeRoy - Since Victor Fleming got credit for The Wizard of Oz, I guess that leaves me stuck with Golddiggers of 1933 too.

8.  Penny Marshall - Jumpin' Jack Flash

9.  Norman Z. McLeod - No one can truly take credit for directing a Marx Brothers movie, so I'll have to ditch Horsefeathers for It's a Gift.  That's okay, either one, I don't care...

10.  Ronald Neame - The Odessa File

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1.  Woody Allen  --  A soon-to-be released film   --  "Why I Like Young Girls"    (Sorry, just kidding.)  Hannah & Her Sisters

2. Roger Corman  --  Pass

3.  Andre DeToth  --  Pitfall

4.  Blake Edwards  -- Victor/Victoria 

5.  David Fincher  --  The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

6.  Samuel Fuller  --  Pickup on South Street

7.  Mervyn LeRoy  --  Five Star Final

8.  Penny Marshall --  A League of Their Own

9. Norman Z McLeod  -- Topper

10.  Ronald Neame --  The Man Who Never Was

 

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

1. Woody Allen- I think I've only seen Annie Hall, and I would NOT consider that film a favorite.  Honestly, I didn't get what all the fuss was about.

3. Andre DeToth- Crime Wave

 

So glad you mentioned Crime Wave. Coin flip for me between that one and Day of the Outlaw. As for Annie Hall, I think there was a certain element of "you had to be there," as is the case with many an Oscar choice or sometimes even critical raves. Many an Oscar has that "We want to acknowledge your place in the business and clutch you to our collective bosom as one of us" feeling. Voting for Annie Hall saluted Woody, Diane Keaton, independent and individualistic movies, women who weren't conventional sex symbols, etc.

For people like you who haven't seen Woody Allen's films, I'd suggest starting with the funny ones, like Sleeper, Broadway Danny Rose, and Midnight in Paris, and then maybe slightly more esoteric but still funny and enjoyable ones like Zelig, The Purple Rose of Cairo, and Radio Days, a serious one like Crimes and Misdemeanors, and I'd add Husbands and Wives except for the nauseating jiggle cam.

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3 hours ago, kingrat said:

For people like you who haven't seen Woody Allen's films, I'd suggest starting with the funny ones, like Sleeper, Broadway Danny Rose, and Midnight in Paris, and then maybe slightly more esoteric but still funny and enjoyable ones like Zelig, The Purple Rose of Cairo, and Radio Days, a serious one like Crimes and Misdemeanors, and I'd add Husbands and Wives except for the nauseating jiggle cam.

I've never...ever...ever...EVER understood the critical fascination with Broadway Danny Rose, as the dressup New Jersey imitations just came off as cringeworthy.  Love and Death is still the last classic Early Funny point just before "seriocomic" Annie Hall, where Woody could still be silly with random non-sequiturs and deadpan burlesques of Bergman and Eisenstein, but still angst over the futility of the universe.  And Annie Hall was "you had to be there", but only for its unique 8-1/2 like mix of real and subjective imagination scenes, applied to neurotic 70's NY relationship humor.  It spawned a lot of bad imitations for a decade, but Woody's opening speech about "My philosophy of two jokes" captures more of his cosmology in one film than he could drag out in six.  

Zelig was more of an uncharacteristic return to his New Yorker-magazine non-sequitur silliness of Take the Money & Run and Bananas, even though it's from his "stylistic imitation" period, where he's trying to imitate 30's newsreels.  And The Purple Rose of Cairo is taken almost straight out of one of his specific early short stories, although with more harsh Depression-era malaise pasted on for "message".

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1) Woody Allen - Broadway Danny Rose

2) Roger Corman - The Wasp Woman

3) Andre deToth - House of Wax

4) Blake Edwards - Experiment in Terror

5) David Fincher - The Social Network

6) Sam Fuller - The Naked Kiss

7) Mervyn LeRoy - The Bad Seed / Gypsy  (too close to call!)

8) Penny Marshall -

9) Norman McLeod - 

10) Ronald Neame - The Poseidon Adventure

Thanks, Det Jim!  I agree with Kingrat.  These are fun!

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1. Woody Allen The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)

2. Roger Corman N/A

3. Andre DeToth The Indian Fighter (1955)

4. Blake Edwards Darling Lili (1970)

5. David Fincher Zodiac (2007)

6. Sam Fuller House of Bamboo (1955)

7. Mervyn LeRoy Random Harvest (1942)

8. Penny Marshall Jumpin' Jack Flash (1986)

9. Norman Z McLeod The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947)

10. Ronald Neame  The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969)

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38 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Andre DeToth The Indian Fighter (1955)

Blake Edwards Darling Lili (1970)

David Fincher Zodiac (2007)

Mervyn LeRoy Random Harvest (1942)

These were my second choices for said directors. They all have many strong films on their resumes.

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On 2/28/2021 at 9:43 AM, Swithin said:

2. Roger Corman The Undead (1957)

 

On 2/28/2021 at 11:48 AM, SansFin said:

2. Roger Corman - A Bucket of Blood (1959)

I'm less bothered that half the responders don't know any good Woody Allen films, as the ones that don't know any good Roger Corman-directed films.  (Especially after I sprung for that Blu-ray box of the Vincent Price Edgar Allan Poe movies last October.)

In addition to the above choices, I'd add X: the Man with the X-Ray Eyes (1963) as evidence of Corman's "B doesn't always stand for Bad" style of sneaking a little highbrow art ambitions in with the drive-in double feature.

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2 hours ago, EricJ said:

 

I'm less bothered that half the responders don't know any good Woody Allen films, as the ones that don't know any good Roger Corman-directed films.  (Especially after I sprung for that Blu-ray box of the Vincent Price Edgar Allan Poe movies last October.)

In addition to the above choices, I'd add X: the Man with the X-Ray Eyes (1963) as evidence of Corman's "B doesn't always stand for Bad" style of sneaking a little highbrow art ambitions in with the drive-in double feature.

Radio Days is not just funny and enjoyable. It's one of the best encapsulations of an era, and of various New York communities of that era, as has ever been put on film. Although I would place Manhattan as my second choice, and I love Zelig, Broadway Danny Rose, and a few others, Radio Days is Allen's magnum opus.  His more highly acclaimed films -- Hannah, Annie, etc. -- are nice depictions of contemporary NY angst and neuroses, but as a New Yorker of three generations, Radio Days is the best. And Radio Days no more plagiarises Bergman/Fellini than Shakespeare plagiarises Chaucer.

Regarding Corman, there is charm in his unique early films -- The Undead, Little Shop of Horrors, etc. that transcends the overblown camp of the Vincent Price shlock/camp films. Not that I have anything against shlock and camp!

Although I did enjoy, as a young teen, going to a cinema in White Plains, NY, where Vincent Price, Boris Karloff, and Peter Lorre made a personal appearance on a Saturday afternoon, promoting the film: The Raven.

 

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1. Woody Allen  -   Annie Hall   (1977)

2. Roger Corman   -  The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967)

3. Andre DeToth  -  Crime Wave  (1954)

4. Blake Edwards   -   The Days of Wine and Roses  (1962)

5. David Fincher  -   Se7en (1995)

6. Sam Fuller  -   Pickup on South Street  -   (1953)

7. Mervyn LeRoy   -   The Bad Seed   (1956)

8. Penny Marshall  -   A League of Their Own   (1992)

9. Norman Z McLeod   -     Monkey Business  (1931)

10. Ronald Neame   -    Tunes of Glory  (1960)

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8 hours ago, Swithin said:

And Radio Days no more plagiarises Bergman/Fellini than Shakespeare plagiarises Chaucer.

I thought it was just pure autobiographical humor at first too, until the big Fellini-esque New Year's party at the end, and then..."Ohhh, right, it's all just anecdotes, it's their little village of Brooklyn, they're peeking on the new teacher, they barely notice the war going on, and they've got a crazy uncle, duh.  (thump head)".  I stand by my Amarcord comparisons.

Quote

Regarding Corman, there is charm in his unique early films -- The Undead, Little Shop of Horrors, etc. that transcends the overblown camp of the Vincent Price shlock/camp films. Not that I have anything against shlock and camp!

Charles B. Griffith gave him some surprisingly clever and funny scripts, not just for Undead and Horrors, but a perfect parody of pretentious beatnik culture in A Bucket of Blood.  

Otherwise, Corman's charm is that he was allowed to do anything he wanted, so he tried to slip a little artistic Metaphor into X and It Conquered the World when you least expect it.

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

I thought it was just pure autobiographical humor at first too, until the big Fellini-esque New Year's party at the end, and then..."Ohhh, right, it's all just anecdotes, it's their little village of Brooklyn, they're peeking on the new teacher, they barely notice the war going on, and they've got a crazy uncle, duh.  (thump head)".  I stand by my Amarcord comparisons.

Charles B. Griffith gave him some surprisingly clever and funny scripts, not just for Undead and Horrors, but a perfect parody of pretentious beatnik culture in A Bucket of Blood.  

Otherwise, Corman's charm is that he was allowed to do anything he wanted, so he tried to slip a little artistic Metaphor into X and It Conquered the World when you least expect it.

Regarding Amarcord/Radio Days, yes of course there are similarities; after all, there are only so many stories in the world, and stories involving the memories of youth represent a major genre. 

I had forgotten that Corman directed It Conquered the World. Yes, it's another example of his good early period. My father took me to see it when I was six, and I still remember it fondly.  I argue with a friend as to how to pronounce the title. I say it's "It CONQUERED the World."  She says it's "IT Conquered the World." What do you think? (Please don't tell me you think it's "It Conquered the WORLD.!")

 

 

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  1. Another Woman (1988)
  2. The St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967)
  3. Crime Wave (1953)
  4. Experiment in Terror (1962)
  5. Zodiac (2007)
  6. The Baron of Arizona (1950)
  7. Five Star Final (1931)
  8. Awakenings (1990)
  9. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (1947)
  10. Hopscotch (1980)
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