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Your Favorite Film Of These Directors #4


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Ten more directors, pick your favorite film by each of them.

1. Terence Fisher

2. Richard Fleischer

3, Milos Forman

4, Neil Jordan

5. Anthony Mann

6. Otto Preminger

7. Irving Rapper

8. Mark Robson

9.Frank Tashlin

10. Robert Wise

here's mine:

1. Terence Fisher Horror Of Dracula (1958)

2. Richard Fleischer Narrow Margin (1952)

3, Milos Forman Man On The Moon (1999)

4, Neil Jordan The Crying Game (1992)

5. Anthony Mann The Tin Star (1957)

6. Otto Preminger Laura (1944)

7. Irving Rapper Now, Voyager (1942)

8. Mark Robson Champion (1949)

9.Frank Tashlin Artists And Models (1955)

10. Robert Wise West Side Story (1961)

 

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1. Terence Fisher The Astonished Heart (1950) [Fisher's horror films are too stodgy.]

2. Richard Fleischer The Happy Time (1952)

3. Milos Forman Loves of a Blonde (1976)

4. Neil Jordan The Company of Wolves (1984)

5. Anthony Mann The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)

6. Otto Preminger Kidnapped (1938)

7. Irving Rapper Now, Voyager (1942)

8. Mark Robson The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958)

9. Frank Tashlin Who's Minding the Store (1963)

10. Robert Wise The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

 

 

 

 

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  1. Horror of Dracula
  2. The Vikings
  3. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
  4. The Butcher Boy
  5. Winchester '73
  6. Laura
  7. Now, Voyager
  8. The Seventh Victim
  9. Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?
  10. The Day the Earth Stood Still
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1. Terence Fisher So Long at the Fair (1950)

2. Richard Fleischer Compulsion (1959)

3. Milos Forman Amadeus (1984)

4. Neil Jordan Interview with the Vampire (1994) (hah)

5. Anthony Mann Winchester '73 (1950)

6. Otto Preminger Anatomy of a Murder (1959)

7. Irving Rapper Now, Voyager (1942)

8. Mark Robson The Seventh Victim (1943)

9. Frank Tashlin The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)

10. Robert Wise The Haunting (1963)

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I can't come up with anything off the top of my head for many of these. But I'd definitely pick Amadeus for Forman and "Born To Kill" for Robert Wise. I'd pick "The Gay Sisters" for Irving Rapper because it is just so weird. 

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  1. The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959)
  2. 10 Rillington Place (1971)
  3. The People vs. Larry Flynt (1996)
  4. High Spirits (1988)
  5. Raw Deal (1948)
  6. The Fan (1949)
  7. Now, Voyager (1942)
  8. Bright Victory (1951)
  9. Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? (1957)
  10. Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956)
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1. Terence Fisher - The Curse of the Werewolf (1961)

2.  Richard Fleischer - 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)

3. Milos Forman - Amadeus (theatrical cut*) (1985)

4. Neil Jordan - The Company of Wolves (1984)

6. Otto Preminger - Anatomy of a Murder (1959), maybe, but Otto still set the bar as THE Mr. Freeze in the Batman universe

8. Mark Robson - The Ghost Ship (1943)

9. Frank Tashlin - The Girl Can't Help It (1956)  (Best cartoon:  The Unruly Hare - 1945)

10.  Robert Wise - The Curse of the Cat People (1944)

---

[* - Was having an online discussion about how gawdawfully Warner's George-Lucas'ing of the Amadeus: Directors Cut ruined the original, just because they were too lazy to 4K remaster another version for DVD to take to Blu-ray and streaming, and one fan chimed in, "I hear they're remastering both versions for an upcoming 4K UHD release later this year!"  That miracle of heaven sounded so much like fan-forum wishful thinking, I had to double-check that rumor with any of the other core home-theater geeks on the board.   I hope I'm not the only one who is.]

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1.  The Devil Rides Out (1968--Terence Fisher)

2.  Soylent Green (1973--Richard Fleischer) 

3.  Ragtime (1981--Milos Forman)

4.  The End of the Affair (1999--Neil Jordan)

5.  The Tall Target (1951--Anthony Mann)

6.  Angel Face (1953--Otto Preminger)

7.  The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938--Irving Rapper)**

8.  Valley of the Dolls (1967--Mark Robson)

9.  The Glass Bottom Boat (1966--Frank Tashlin)

10. Executive Suite (1954--Robert Wise)

**Big whoops here, as noted below by EricJ!  Correction down the thread. 

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41 minutes ago, midwestan said:

7.  The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938--Irving Rapper)

Think you checked IMDb too quickly:  Rapper was dialogue director (yes, I don't know why they listed those first) on Robin Hood, as directed by THE great Michael Curtiz.

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1. Terence Fisher- Haven't seen any

2. Richard Fleischer- His Kind of Woman (even though he was uncredited.  Howard Hughes basically blackmailed him into "fixing" John Farrow's film by threatening not to release Fleischer's The Narrow Margin, if Fleischer did not cooperate)

3, Milos Forman- Amadeus

4, Neil Jordan- Haven't seen any

5. Anthony Mann- The Furies

6. Otto Preminger- Laura

7. Irving Rapper- Now, Voyager 

8. Mark Robson- Valley of the Dolls

9.Frank Tashlin- Susan Slept Here

10. Robert Wise- Odds Against Tomorrow

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Screen Shot 2020-09-21 at 10.52.24 AM

1. Terence Fisher..THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1962)

2. Richard Fleischer..THE NARROW MARGIN (1952)

3, Milos Forman..AMADEUS (1984)

4, Neil Jordan..MICHAEL COLLINS (1996)

5. Anthony Mann...RAW DEAL (1948) Claire Trevor is fantastic. John Alton's lighting set-ups are perfect.

6. Otto Preminger..SUCH GOOD FRIENDS (1971)

7. Irving Rapper..STRANGE INTRUDER (1956)

8. Mark Robson..VON RYAN'S EXPRESS (1965)

9.Frank Tashlin..CINDERFELLA (1960)

10. Robert Wise..ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW (1959)

odds_against_tomorrow.jpeg

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Terence Fisher  -  Horror of Dracula (1958)

2. Richard Fleischer  -  Armored Car Robbery (1950)

3, Milos Forman  -  One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

4, Neil Jordan  -  Mona Lisa (1986)

5. Anthony Mann  -  Men in War (1957)

6. Otto Preminger  -  Advise & Consent (1962)

7. Irving Rapper  -  Now, Voyager (1942)

8. Mark Robson  -  The Harder They Fall (1956)

9.Frank Tashlin  -  The Paleface (1948)

10. Robert Wise  -   The Set-Up (1949) / West Side Story (1961) (tie)

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1. Terence Fisher - The Curse of Frankenstein (1957)

2. Richard Fleischer - 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1954)

3, Milos Forman - Amadeus (1984)

4, Neil Jordan - We're No Angels (1989)

5. Anthony Mann - The Bamboo Blonde (1946)

6. Otto Preminger - Laura (1944)

7. Irving Rapper - Another Man's Poison (1951)

8. Mark Robson - The Little Hut (1957)

9.Frank Tashlin - The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)

10. Robert Wise - The Haunting (1963), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Run Silent Run Deep (1958), This Could Be the Night (1957), The Desert Rats (1953), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Two for the Seesaw (1962), The Body Snatcher (1945), The Curse of the Cat People (1944)

I feel justified listing so many for: Robert Wise because there are several directors here that I must look at a list of their work and choose the least obnoxious movie but I own DVDs of the: Robert Wise movies I listed.

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1. Terence Fisher N/A

2. Richard Fleischer The Narrow Margin (1952)

3, Milos Forman Ragtime (1981)

4, Neil Jordan The End of the Affair (1999)

5. Anthony Mann The Furies (1950)

6. Otto Preminger Laura (1944)

7. Irving Rapper Now, Voyager (1942)

8. Mark Robson Peyton Place (1957)

9.Frank Tashlin The Glass Bottom Boat (1966)

10. Robert Wise The Sound of Music (1965)

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

Think you checked IMDb too quickly:  Rapper was dialogue director (yes, I don't know why they listed those first) on Robin Hood, as directed by THE great Michael Curtiz.

Yes, I did!  In that case, I'll amend my Irving Rapper submission and go with:

7.  The Corn Is Green from 1945.

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1. Terence Fisher - So Long at the Fair

2. Richard Fleischer - The Narrow Margin

3. Milos Forman - (see below); Ragtime? Valmont?

4. Neil Jordan - The Crying Game

5. Anthony Mann - The Furies; Anthony Mann noir: Raw Deal

6. Otto Preminger - Bonjour Tristesse

7. Irving Rapper - Now, Voyager

8. Mark Robson - The Inn of the Sixth Happiness

9. Frank Tashlin - (see below); The Glass Bottom Boat

10. Robert Wise - West Side Story

This was an unusually interesting group as I tried to pick favorites. Some of these directors have made films that I love. I loathe and avoid horror movies, so the only Terence Fisher film I've seen is So Long at the Fair, which I like very much. Wild choices of genre for some: The Narrow Margin or 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea? The Furies or Raw Deal? The Inn of the Sixth Happiness or The Seventh Victim? West Side Story or Born To Kill (or films from all the other genres Wise mastered)?

Apparently, Milos Forman is a director I admire rather than love, and I didn't know that until now. I appreciate his best-known films while not having much desire to see them again. I thought of Intimate Lighting until I remembered that's an Ivan Passer film. I wouldn't mind seeing Valmont again, but I love Stephen Frears' Dangerous Liaisons.

As for Frank Tashlin, The Glass Bottom Boat is noteworthy for the fun-loving colors of its cinematography. The Alphabet Murders is entertaining, Susan Slept Here has its clever moments, and yeah, Tashlin would not rank high on my list of favorite directors.

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3 hours ago, SansFin said:

10. Robert Wise - The Haunting (1963), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Run Silent Run Deep (1958), This Could Be the Night (1957), The Desert Rats (1953), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Two for the Seesaw (1962), The Body Snatcher (1945), The Curse of the Cat People (1944)

I feel justified listing so many for: Robert Wise because there are several directors here that I must look at a list of their work and choose the least obnoxious movie but I own DVDs of the: Robert Wise movies I listed.

One thing that's fascinating about Robert Wise: The House on Telegraph Hill, The Set-Up, Born To Kill, Odds Against Tomorrow--no two of these adventures in film noir look or feel very much like each other. If Wise had sought a Zen-like annihilation of personality in each film, he could not have succeeded more fully. I intend this as high praise. Perhaps this is why Wise is successful in so many different genres.

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7 hours ago, SansFin said:

...10. Robert Wise - The Haunting (1963), The Andromeda Strain (1971), Run Silent Run Deep (1958), This Could Be the Night (1957), The Desert Rats (1953), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Two for the Seesaw (1962), The Body Snatcher (1945), The Curse of the Cat People (1944)

I feel justified listing so many for: Robert Wise because there are several directors here that I must look at a list of their work and choose the least obnoxious movie but I own DVDs of the: Robert Wise movies I listed.

I'm kind'a shocked here Sans that as big of a "King of Cool" fan that you are, you seem to have no DVD copy of Wise's The Sand Pebbles in your collection?

You didn't list it here anyway, nor even mentioned it as one of your favorite films from this director.

(...and yeah, I became a fan of Wise's after watching The Haunting years ago for the first time back in the late-'60s on TV when I was a teenager...no movie up 'til then had so effectively frightened me to the extent that that movie had)

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3 hours ago, kingrat said:

One thing that's fascinating about Robert Wise: The House on Telegraph Hill, The Set-Up, Born To Kill, Odds Against Tomorrow--no two of these adventures in film noir look or feel very much like each other. If Wise had sought a Zen-like annihilation of personality in each film, he could not have succeeded more fully. I intend this as high praise. Perhaps this is why Wise is successful in so many different genres.

Each studio had its own style. Wise was successful in adapting to the 'language' of each studio. HOUSE ON TELEGRAPH HILL is a 20th Century Fox film that has completely different production values than the earlier films he had made at RKO. Another director who adapted well to the idiosyncrasies and artistic/commercial aims of each studio was Edward Dmytryk.

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3 hours ago, kingrat said:

One thing that's fascinating about Robert Wise: The House on Telegraph Hill, The Set-Up, Born To Kill, Odds Against Tomorrow--no two of these adventures in film noir look or feel very much like each other. If Wise had sought a Zen-like annihilation of personality in each film, he could not have succeeded more fully. I intend this as high praise. Perhaps this is why Wise is successful in so many different genres.

His work is one of the reasons why I feel that the entire: "director as auteur" theory is pretentious crap. Other directors might have to stamp their 'style' on all of their movies to identify their work in order to seek fulfilment but Robert Wise relied solely on simple excellence and put the integrity of the story ahead of his own ego.

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2 hours ago, Dargo said:

I'm kind'a shocked here Sans that as big of a "King of Cool" fan that you are, you seem to have no DVD copy of Wise's The Sand Pebbles in your collection?

You didn't list it here anyway, nor even mentioned it as one of your favorite films from this director.

(...and yeah, I become a fan of Wise's after watching The Haunting years ago for the first time back in the late-'60s on TV when I was a teenager...no movie up 'til then had so effectively frightened me to the extent that that movie had)

It may surprise you that it would be very difficult to force me to watch that movie or most of his westerns. He is himself only when he is not forced into a cheap costume and ordered to deliver babble. 

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41 minutes ago, SansFin said:

It may surprise you that it would be very difficult to force me to watch that movie or most of his westerns. He is himself only when he is not forced into a cheap costume and ordered to deliver babble. 

Interesting. I've always thought of McQueen's Jake Holman in TSP as not only one of his signature roles (and his only Oscar nom), but also a role in which his image as the outsider/rebel who's resistant to rules and regulations was put to good use in Wise's film.

(...and even though the western Nevada Smith was Hathaway-directed, it sounds as if you might not be that big on this film of McQueen's either, eh?...gotta say, I've always thought it very underrated)

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1. Terence Fisher,  Horror of Dracula (1958)

2. Richard Fleischer,  The Narrow Margin (1952)

3, Milos Forman,  Amadeus (1984)

4, Neil Jordan,  The Crying Game (1992)

5. Anthony Mann,  Winchester '73 (1950)

6. Otto Preminger,  Laura (1944)

7. Irving Rapper,  The Corn Is Green (1945)

8. Mark Robson,  Bright Victory (1951)

9.Frank Tashlin,  The Geisha Boy (1958)

10. Robert Wise,  The Sand Pebbles (1966)

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