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Now, that's glamor.


slaytonf
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18 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

that's

That's...WHO? Can't quite make out who she is.

(...and btw slayton...thanks SO much for excising that oh so needless letter 'u' in your thread's title for me, BUT it appears we Americans ARE supposed to include that superfluous letter in the word "glamour" TOO for some dumb reason!) ;)

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3 minutes ago, Dargo said:

That's...WHO?

(...and btw slayton...thanks so much for excising that oh so needless letter 'u' in your thread's title for me, BUT it appears we Americans ARE supposed to include that superfluous letter in the word "glamour" TOO for some dumb reason!!!) ;)

Sorry, spurious 'that's'.  Now excised along with the superfluous 'u'.

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15 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

Sorry, spurious 'that's'.  Now excised along with the superfluous 'u'.

Hmmm..."spurious", eh?!

A little confused here then.

Are you saying that you don't think the actress's look is as glamorous as supposed?

(...and btw, who IS that dame up there, anyway?)

(...AND btw...who knew when you add the suffix-"ous" to the word "glamour", you then leave off the 'u' in the root word?...boy, this here English language sure is a strange one, isn't it)

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Sorry, wrong adjective.  Extraneous.  I was trying to copy italicized text to the title.  But. Titles. Just.  Will.  Only.  Be.  In.  Plain.  Text.  Damn.

The lady is Kay Francis in Mandalay (1934), which we saw tonight. 

Noah Webster wasn't completely successful in eradicating French 'u's from American.

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

...What IS glamour to you? Sparkley dress? Shiny hair & footwear? Or is it an attitude?

Well, I have to say mostly "Glamour" to ME was that magazine I always saw sitting on the coffee table in the apartment of an old girlfriend of mine.

And coincidentally, said old friend always reminded me of Cheryl Tiegs, except not quite as skinny.

Seriously though, yes, I would say "attitude" does play a role into the concept of glamour, as I would think it doesn't matter how flashy or sophisticated the look of the clothes are that someone is wearing  and unless there's an accompanying attitude of self-confidence emanating from the person who is wearing them.

(...for instance, take a look at the posture and facial expressions of both Kay and William up there)

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And THEN of course I could've gone with...

gVGsOIJ.jpg

  Thanks Heaven, for little girls...

Sometimes they grow up to wear men's clothes and still look chic 

(...and sung in an Parisian accent, of course)

 

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11 minutes ago, Dargo said:

 

  Dressed up like a million dollar trooper...

Trying hard to look like Gary Cooper 

(...super duper)

Dargo old man,

In this case, you are correct. Even in America, the preferred spelling is GLAMOUR.

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5 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Dargo old man,

Even in America, the preferred spelling is GLAMOUR.

I know, Swithin. I mentioned that earlier in this thread.

(...and I loved slayton's reply to it when he said, "Noah Webster wasn't completely successful in eradicating French 'u's from American.")

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

I know, Swithin. I mentioned that earlier in this thread.

(...and I loved slayton's reply to it when he said, "Noah Webster wasn't completely successful in eradicating French 'u's from American.")

The word actually derives from the Scots. My (yellowing) copy of the Malleus Maleficarum, which is an English translation by Montague Summers from the Latin, has a chapter entitled: "Whether Witches can by some Glamour Change Men into Beasts."  

Another passage from that part of the work (Question 10), asks: "What is it to be Thought of Wolves that sometimes Seize and Eat Men and Children out of their Cradles; whether this also is a Glamour caused by Witches."

The original meaning of the word comes from grammar, or learning, including the occult uses of learning, sometimes related to illusion:

"... a certain sorceress named Circe changed the companions of Ulysses into beasts; but that this was due to some glamour or illusion, rather than an actual accomplishment, by altering the fancies of men...'

In any case, the work does says that "The devil delights in such things,"

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8 minutes ago, Swithin said:

 "Whether Witches can by some Glamour Change Men into Beasts."  

 

That seems to me to be on the same level as changing a wolf into a wolf but I will admit that any woman can be a witch when she wants to be.

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14 minutes ago, SansFin said:

That seems to me to be on the same level as changing a wolf into a wolf but I will admit that any woman can be a witch when she wants to be.

That may come under Chapter IV of the MM: "Here follows the Way whereby Witches copulate with those Devils known as Incubi."

(To elucidate further on that chapter would not be suitable for this Board!)

 

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52 minutes ago, Swithin said:

That may come under Chapter IV of the MM: "Here follows the Way whereby Witches copulate with those Devils known as Incubi."

(To elucidate further on that chapter would not be suitable for this Board!)

 

Pibgorn is a comic strip by Brooke McEldowney. The main character is a fairy. Her best friend Drusilla is a succubus. The creator moved it from comics.com to gocomics.com because he wished to explore stories and themes deemed unsuitable for a family newspaper. Here is a sample from the original run:  https://www.gocomics.com/pibgorn/2003/12/12 

I identify strongly with Drusilla.

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1 hour ago, Swithin said:

The word actually derives from the Scots. My (yellowing) copy of the Malleus Maleficarum, which is an English translation by Montague Summers from the Latin, has a chapter entitled: "Whether Witches can by some Glamour Change Men into Beasts."  

Another passage from that part of the work (Question 10), asks: "What is it to be Thought of Wolves that sometimes Seize and Eat Men and Children out of their Cradles; whether this also is a Glamour caused by Witches."

The original meaning of the word comes from grammar, or learning, including the occult uses of learning, sometimes related to illusion:

"... a certain sorceress named Circe changed the companions of Ulysses into beasts; but that this was due to some glamour or illusion, rather than an actual accomplishment, by altering the fancies of men...'

In any case, the work does says that "The devil delights in such things,"

Interesting, Swithin. Never would've thought the etymological basis of the word would've stemmed from Scotland.

So, unless I'm wrong here and am ignorant of the complete text of The Scottish Play (and which I must admit I am to quite a degree, and despite once acting and reciting a couple of the Macbeth character's soliloguies during a collective LAUSD high school Shakespearean competition held at the UCLA campus...and winning Third Place honors, I might add) wouldn't you think The Bard would have somehow worked the word "glamour" into the dialogue of the Three Witches in that play? Or at least, into the dialogue of SOME character in that play?

(...but like I said, maybe he DID and I'm just ignorant of it...I'm sure YOU'D know anyway, you stagestruck anglophile, you!)  ;)

 

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