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Actor and Musician George Segal (1934-2021)


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https://deadline.com/2021/03/george-segal-dead-the-goldbergs-1234720483/

George Segal Dies: Oscar-Nominated Actor & ‘The Goldbergs’ Star Was 87

George Segal, the Oscar-nominated actor whose credits range from Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Where’s Poppa? to Just Shoot Me! and The Goldbergs, died today in Santa Rosa, CA, of complications from bypass surgery. He was 87.

His wife, Sonia Segal confirmed the news. “The family is devastated to announce that this morning George Segal passed away due to complications from bypass surgery,” she said in a statement.

For the past eight years, Segal had been a series regular on ABC’s 1980s-set family comedy The Goldbergs. The last episode he filmed before his death, Episode 16 of the show’s current eighth season, is set to air April 7. The series is expected to pay tribute to Segal on-air.

Segal, an Oscar nominee for Mike Nichols’ 1966 Edward Albee adaptation Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, probably is best known for his TV sitcom roles as magazine publisher Jack Gallo on NBC’s Just Shoot Me!, a role that earned him two Golden Globe nominations, and as family patriarch Albert “Pops” Solomon on The Goldbergs. He also headlined the late-’80s ABC detective drama Murphy’s Law, the 1987 CBS comedy Take Five and TV Land sitcom Retired at 35.

Segal also was a leading man in movies, starring in films by such legends as Sidney Lumet (Bye Bye Braverman, 1968), Carl Reiner (Where’s Poppa?, 1970), Herbert Ross (The Owl and the Pussycat, 1970), Paul Mazursky (Blume in Love, 1973) and Robert Altman (California Split, 1974).

He also has starring roles in such features as A Touch of Class, The Terminal Man, The Black Bird, Fun with Dick and Jane, Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?, Time of Darkness and For the Boys.

Along with his Academy Award nomination, Segal was a five-time Golden Globe nominee and has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

MORE TO COME…

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Sad to hear this. We featured him in the Winter Under the Stars thread a few weeks ago.

George Segal was always charming, whether in dramas or comedies.

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 11.03.44 AM

And a bit edgy if the film called for it.

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 11.05.12 AM

Here he is in FUN WITH DICK AND JANE (1977):

Screen Shot 2021-03-05 at 11.06.42 AM

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20 minutes ago, slaytonf said:

He had a touch of class.

Don't forget No Way to Treat a Lady (1968).

And he had a whole new generation of fans because of the sitcom Just Shoot Me!

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2 hours ago, MikaelaArsenault said:

https://deadline.com/2021/03/george-segal-dead-the-goldbergs-1234720483/

George Segal Dies: Oscar-Nominated Actor & ‘The Goldbergs’ Star Was 87

Segal also was a leading man in movies, starring in films by such legends as Sidney Lumet (Bye Bye Braverman, 1968), Carl Reiner (Where’s Poppa?, 1970), Herbert Ross (The Owl and the Pussycat, 1970), Paul Mazursky (Blume in Love, 1973) and Robert Altman (California Split, 1974).

He also has starring roles in such features as A Touch of Class, The Terminal Man, The Black Bird, Fun with Dick and Jane, Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?, Time of Darkness and For the Boys.

 

Um, two missing words: KING RAT.

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It's always amused me that Segal starred in the 1981 screen comedy "Carbon Copy," in which he played a white businessman who discovered he had a black son he never knew about. His young co-star -- who made his feature debut opposite Segal -- had portrayed Malcolm X on stage. Wonder what ever happened to him?

See the source image

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Segal was always a little too sitcom and slick in his delivery, but to his credit, that MADE him the face of neurotic Nixon-era 70's NYC comedy.  

Even watching him on The Goldbergs (of which I could only watch one episode before wanting to throw things at the randomly bad selective-memory "slumming" of half-remembered 80's Lore), he seemed to have come from a different decade than the 80's or the 00's, to show the new kids how aggressively comedy was handled in the 70's.  He came off as the cool sly-fox grandpa in more ways than one.
Although I confess I only saw him in the pleasantly forgettable Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?, the wacky product-of-its-time Where's Poppa? the aptly titled The Terminal Man, and the...ill-advised Carbon Copy, that showed how much he didn't belong to the 80's.

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6 minutes ago, NipkowDisc said:

any tribute to him should include imo the hilarious movie Bye Bye Braverman.

'we'll get there."

Bye Bye Braverman (1968) - Photo Gallery - IMDbhttp://www.i
 

YES, I love this one. It's in the TCM library and airs once a year. Hope they replay it soon.

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7 hours ago, EricJ said:

Segal was always a little too sitcom and slick in his delivery, but to his credit, that MADE him the face of neurotic Nixon-era 70's NYC comedy.  

Even watching him on The Goldbergs (of which I could only watch one episode before wanting to throw things at the randomly bad selective-memory "slumming" of half-remembered 80's Lore), he seemed to have come from a different decade than the 80's or the 00's, to show the new kids how aggressively comedy was handled in the 70's.  He came off as the cool sly-fox grandpa in more ways than one.
Although I confess I only saw him in the pleasantly forgettable Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe?, the wacky product-of-its-time Where's Poppa? the aptly titled The Terminal Man, and the...ill-advised Carbon Copy, that showed how much he didn't belong to the 80's.

My mom tried watching The Goldbergs, but she thought that the show was very unfunny.

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So sorry to hear this. I didn't realize he was that old. He had a long string of hits in the 60s and 70s. I think his pulling out of 10 at the last minute really hurt his career (it made Dudley Moore's). He was pretty funny in Just Shoot Me. I really liked that show.

Never even heard of The Goldbergs (how much I watch network tv now). Didn't realize he was back on tv.

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Oh, so now it's official. (lemme 'splain)

I had wondered whatever became of him and resigned to the possibility of him already being dead when lo and behold, there he was, up on the big screen when I went to see LOOK WHO'S TALKING in '89!  

Sorry to learn of this as he WAS one that I always enjoyed in movies. 

Rest In Peace, Sir.

Sepiatone

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My George Segal top five-

1. Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? (1966) He was excellent as the strait laced teacher shocked by the antics of the middle aged couple he is partying with. So sad that all four  stars of this brilliant version of Edward Albee's play are gone now.

2.  No Way To Treat A Lady (1968) He is delight as the Jewish cop harassed by loony killer Rod Steiger. Segal's character still lives with his mother (Eileen Heckart) and has many funny scenes with her.

3. Where's Poppa (1970) Segal has even worse mother issues with Ruth Gordon in this provocative but often hysterically funny film.

4. The Owl And The Pussycat (1970) Many laughs as the nerdy intellectual stuck with low class hooker Barbra Streisand.

5. Born To Win (1971) A lesser known film, but worth seeing. One of Segal's best performances as a charming junkie trying to make it through another day.

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  • MikaelaArsenault changed the title to Actor and Musician George Segal (1934-2021)

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